Speed Feed stock vs. side saddle for home defense?


PDA






Tallbald
March 3, 2013, 02:00 PM
Never owned or used a "speed feed" stock on a shotgun, and can't really conclude whether they are a problematic addition to a working gun or not. I don't like things hanging off a working gun (I don't personally feel a need for two sets of sights co-witnessed, with a laser and a flashlight at this point). Is a speed feed stock easier to use in practice than a receiver mounted side saddle shell holder? As a last ditch method I only wear pants that have pockets. Thoughts appreciated. Don

If you enjoyed reading about "Speed Feed stock vs. side saddle for home defense?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Spawn91
March 3, 2013, 02:47 PM
My HD shotgun I'm picking up this summer will have both a sidesaddle and a speed feed stock.. Since I will not be carrying loose shells in my pajama pockets..as far as sight I'm keeping it simple .. No optics.. I've shot and owned many shotguns over the years and a bead on the front or ghost ring sight will do me just fine

miles1
March 3, 2013, 03:10 PM
What about a elastick stock shell holder? It will cost you maybe $5?

LordDunsany
March 3, 2013, 03:22 PM
Miles1, I don't know how many of these infernal devices I have attempted to use, but every one I bought has lost it's stretch and slides all over, generally ending up upside-down, spilling its cargo of shells from the stretched-out holders. Any attempt to glue it in place or use tape or whatever inevitably ends up failing and leaving a nasty stickum residue on your shotgun's stock.

Arghhhhh!

However, light burst forth recently when I discovered the strap-on buttstock holder made by Specter, a manufacturer of tactical web gear. Once it is strapped in place it is immovable! Moreover it also has a built-in sling adapter. I have since bought one for all my shotguns and made a merry bonfire with the stretched and slippery abominations I had used in the past.

Not associated with Specter etc., etc., but wanted to pass on a possible solution for you. Available on Amazon for about $25 and worth every penny!

Ron in Texas

DougW
March 3, 2013, 11:32 PM
Side saddle (4 round) on my 870, with 6 in the tube, empty chamber, tac light. Load is reduced recoil 00 buck in the tube, 2 on the side saddle, the other 2 on the side are reduced recoil slug. (Side saddle is fastest reload, and I do have an 1100 with a speed feed stock.)

I figure that if I can't get it done with 10 rounds, I have a huge problem!

Tony617
March 4, 2013, 12:30 AM
I also have a Specter Gear buttstock side saddle on my 590A1. It doesn't move once it is attached and it holds the shot shells very securely. I also have a bandolier that hold 50 more rounds but I only have 20 rounds. 10 00 buckshot and 10 Winchester segmented slugs.

allaroundhunter
March 4, 2013, 01:16 AM
The side saddle is easier to reload from while keeping the weapon trained on the threat. I have used speedfeed stocks on a couple of occasions and I just don't care for them.

Messenger Guard
March 4, 2013, 01:45 AM
I've had all of the above and will note problems with all. The side saddle- Any addition that adds material into the receiver which was not previously there can cause problems. Being a lefty, my first shot with a 3" mag caused the side saddle to recoil the sharp rear edge into my finger. It was removed and converted into a 4 shot side saddle by grinding the metal plate up away from my finger and dremeling off a plastic shell holder. I'm not sure if rightys have any problems.
The butt cuff- to get this piece to work well you must stretch it down where you want it and slice the tiniest of holes for the sling mount to "pop" through. Then heat treat it with a lighter to keep it from unraveling and form a hard ring around the sling mount. It will actually catch fire but let it melt a moment and cool. They stretch out over time and need replacing but not bad for the money.
The speed feed- Decently engineered but not the best materials. My SBS is a Remington 870 14" with speed feed. I noticed after I loaded it that a rattle developed inside the stock. The next time I fired the weapon and utilized the speed feed I realized the plastic spring caps had disintegrated under pressure from the two rounds pressuring them. I thought maybe I had over burdened them with a 3" or an S&B capped round and maybe that broke them. A quick email to speed feed and I had two new caps. I installed and made sure to just use 2.75 shells. The plastic spring caps broke almost immediately. This time the cure was to cut the brass anodized bases off two high brass shells and install them backward in place of the shattered caps. This actually works. This has been my experience from real world carry and use. Hope it is helpful.

Texan Scott
March 4, 2013, 02:25 AM
Lol... how many shells of 12ga Buck you reckon a terrified sneak thief's gonna let you get off ay his backside once he realizes what a mistake he's made? Alternativly, how many you think you're gonna need if he refuses to go? :p

lpsharp88
March 4, 2013, 03:11 AM
I store my HD shotgun with chamber empty, 5 shells in the tube, and 1 in the speed feed stock. That way I can top off the tube once I chamber a round.

Messenger Guard
March 4, 2013, 08:35 AM
That is referred to as cruiser ready. That is exactly how to carry.

beatledog7
March 4, 2013, 09:12 AM
how many shells of 12ga Buck you reckon a terrified sneak thief's gonna let you get off at[sic] his backside

At his backside--really? If he's leaning over my daughter's bed, maybe, but not with a shotgun in that case. I guess my sense of what constitutes an imminent threat to me and mine differs from yours.

But back on topic: I use a $5 elastic shell keeper on the buttstock. It does its job well, adds almost zero weight other than the additional shells it holds, and works on either side of the stock of every shotgun I own. Yes, someday it'll loose its elasticity, but by that time I'll be able to acquire another, again for about $5.

LeonCarr
March 4, 2013, 10:36 AM
I hope nobody ever has to be involved in a use of deadly force with a shotgun that requires the user to shoot over 5 rounds. If so, you need backup more than you need more ammo.

Even with that said, I keep a 5 round butt cuff on the gun loaded with Brenneke KOs, 4 rounds of Federal Flitecontrol 00 in the magazine with the shotgun carried Cruiser Safe, and a bandolier loaded with 12 Federal Flitecontrol 00 and 12 Brenneke KOs, just in case :).

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

miles1
March 4, 2013, 10:44 AM
Miles1, I don't know how many of these infernal devices I have attempted to use, but every one I bought has lost it's stretch and slides all over, generally ending up upside-down, spilling its cargo of shells from the stretched-out holders. Any attempt to glue it in place or use tape or whatever inevitably ends up failing and leaving a nasty stickum residue on your shotgun's stock.

Arghhhhh!

However, light burst forth recently when I discovered the strap-on buttstock holder made by Specter, a manufacturer of tactical web gear. Once it is strapped in place it is immovable! Moreover it also has a built-in sling adapter. I have since bought one for all my shotguns and made a merry bonfire with the stretched and slippery abominations I had used in the past.

Not associated with Specter etc., etc., but wanted to pass on a possible solution for you. Available on Amazon for about $25 and worth every penny!

Ron in Texas
Didn't know these existed.I will definelty look into one of these.Thanks.

Fred Fuller
March 4, 2013, 11:05 AM
Never owned or used a "speed feed" stock on a shotgun, and can't really conclude whether they are a problematic addition to a working gun or not. I don't like things hanging off a working gun (I don't personally feel a need for two sets of sights co-witnessed, with a laser and a flashlight at this point). Is a speed feed stock easier to use in practice than a receiver mounted side saddle shell holder? As a last ditch method I only wear pants that have pockets. Thoughts appreciated. Don
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Don,

My ususal response to any "A or B?" question is, "Use whatever works best FOR YOU." I like Sidesaddles and don't care for butt cuffs of any description or Speedfeed magazine type stocks - but I have tried all of them under a variety of conditions before reaching my decision. Try using your choice in a demanding shotgun class and you will know pretty well if it's what you want or not.

My usual routine is to load the magazine with buckshot (one round short of full, to ease a 'select slug' drill) and the Sidesaddle with slugs, but that's due more to an ammo selection decision than a worry over running the gun dry in mid-nastiness. Out here in the country where we live, the shotgun is still the go-to long gun - but it's 50 yards from the front door to the driveway gate, and even with the tight-patterning buckshot I use that's stretching it. So slugs are there in case more range or penetration is needed than buckshot can deliver.

I don't wear pants to bed, much less pants with pockets stuffed with shotgun shells, and if I have to roll out at 3AM and grab a shotgun, I want everything I'm likely to need right there on the gun. That means a weapon light and a reload on board already.

Deer_Freak
March 4, 2013, 11:15 AM
I use the elastic cuffs on my shotguns. It's true the elastic cuffs will lose their elasticity. It is also true that the plastic will become brittle on the sidesaddle shell holders. Either way you have to replace the accessory every so often. With both options your mileage may vary.

Sebastian the Ibis
March 5, 2013, 02:27 AM
+1 to Texan Scott.

It's pretty hard to claim self defense after 2-3 blasts of 00 buck. If you need more than double that, or if you need to shoot more than buckshot range (making self defense even more dubious) grab an EBR.

Tallbald
March 5, 2013, 01:13 PM
I want to take a moment and thank each of you for the thought filled responses. This forum is populated by intelligent, experienced people who are willing to offer suggestions and personal insight to others when asked, and I for one appreciate the information. I think my best bet at this point is to select the plain stock version of the simple 18.5 inch barreled Mossberg 590A1, with the addition of factory ghost ring sights for slug use. Additional cartridges can be sequestered in a number of good ways suggested here. Thanks to each of you again. Don

Rockwolf66
March 5, 2013, 04:53 PM
I have a six round sidesaddle on my Mossberg. I keep it filled with a mix of 00 Buck, Slugs and one round of Rubber buckshot for animal control. Normally the deer are not a problem but in my "neighborhood" there are coyote, bear, Mountain Lion and half feral dogs.

My shotgun (http://www.imfdb.org/images/4/4a/Rock_Side_on.jpg)

OregonJohnny
March 5, 2013, 05:30 PM
As others have said, a side saddle will not only be faster (for most people), but also allows you to keep your eyes and your muzzle in the direction of the threat, without breaking your grip with the weapon hand to reach back to a butt stock sleeve or speed feed. Moving a shotgun shell 2 inches between the side saddle and your chamber or mag tube with your reaction hand is a lot better than moving it 2 feet from your butt stock with your weapon hand.

On my 870 Marine, I keep an empty chamber, 6 rounds of buckshot in the tube, plus a 4 round side saddle holding buckshot. 10 rounds total on the gun. I keep the forward 2 rounds in the side saddle up for a "tactical reload", and the rear 2 rounds down to feed the mag tube. It also has a weapon light mounted. If I lived out in the country, the side saddle would be holding slugs, and I'd probably only load 5 rounds in the mag tube, for the possibility of a slug needed for the first shot.

There is no substitute for good in-person professional instruction, followed by a lot of practice, but to get a pretty good idea of what is possible with a defensive shotgun, as well as it's limitations, it doesn't hurt to watch Magpul's "The Art Of The Dynamic Shotgun" DVD.

Stope Rat
March 5, 2013, 06:53 PM
I'm going to vote sidesaddle - if only for the fixed/constant location of shells.

Mine is "patrol car ready" with 5 rounds buck in the tube and an empty chamber.

Three more rounds of buck in the sidesaddle - stored brass down.

Three rounds of Brenneke slug in the sidesaddle - stored brass up. That way I can feel the brass and tell which round I'm loading. Plus the empty chamber and light tube means that I can load a slug for the first shot if needed without unloading anything first.

Texan Scott
March 5, 2013, 07:21 PM
+1 to beatledog7- you got it. When I jokingly ask how many rounds you'll fire at a man's backside, the answer is NONE... and that's the point; it don't take much when they're already running away. :p

bill3424
March 5, 2013, 09:55 PM
I have a small side saddle that holds 4 rounds on my 870. It doesn't feel bulky and it balances for me well.

Stevie-Ray
March 6, 2013, 05:55 PM
What about a elastick stock shell holder? It will cost you maybe $5? Indeed. My Uncle Mike's on my SPX cost me 6 bucks. Been on there for 2 years. Just checked it and it's still tight.

If it loosened up tomorrow, I'd probably buy another.

dprice3844444
March 6, 2013, 06:32 PM
6 on the saddle plus the 4 in the speedfeed.full magazine.should be enough.shoulder bag with some loose buck hanging next to it wouldn't hurt for the guys in the boonies till the cops show up

If you enjoyed reading about "Speed Feed stock vs. side saddle for home defense?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!