Primer Explosion


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carlo1776
March 4, 2013, 06:20 PM
So the next door neighbor comes over and holds up the tip of his thumb and first 2 fingers. Seems that as he picked up a Large Rifle Primer from his bench, it went off charring the skin, embedding the anvil in his thumb and ricocheting the cap off his eye brow. Good thing he was wearing safety glasses. I've reloaded thousands of rounds and not had one go off, I've dropped them, stepped on them, crunched them in sideways and not one went bang. Static Electricity? Anyhow, re-enforcement to wear safety glasses always.

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BP Hunter
March 4, 2013, 06:39 PM
SOunds like a freak accident.

What a waste of a single primer.:D They are so difficult to find nowadays. Whenever I drop one of them wheil reloading, I get on my knees and sometimes belly just to find that single precious primer.

I'm glad nobody got hurt. Just imagine how a small thing like that hruting you eye...ouch!

ljnowell
March 4, 2013, 06:58 PM
I would be so mad if that happened to me, I hate to waste primers. lol.

Well, looks like someone above beat me to it!

Anyway, I have heard of that happening with static electricity, but always thought it unlikely. I never touch a primer with my fingers though, so I hope I dont have to worry about it. I like to keep needle nose pliers on my bench, just in case i need to individually manipulate a primer. I know, overkill, but it helps me sleep at night knowing that my primers will go bang when I need them to.

BullfrogKen
March 4, 2013, 07:11 PM
Wow. I haven't heard of that happening before.

ArchAngelCD
March 4, 2013, 07:50 PM
Wow. I haven't heard of that happening before.
Neither have I... I truly thought the only way to ignite a primer was to strike in sharply on the opposite side of the anvil. Is this 100% verified???

rcmodel
March 4, 2013, 08:03 PM
Nor have I in 50 years of playing with primers, studying all things reloading I could lay hands on, and most all things ammo related.

Methinks there might be More to this Story then what the neighbor told you! :scrutiny:

rc

Crashbox
March 4, 2013, 08:03 PM
Static discharge??

ArchAngelCD
March 4, 2013, 08:05 PM
Static discharge??
With Black Powder yes, not supposed to happen with smokeless powder and modern primers.

luvit
March 4, 2013, 08:06 PM
if it's possible, it will eventually happen to me.
thanks for the heads-up.

david_r
March 4, 2013, 08:19 PM
Sounds like he should have been wearing a sweat band. :D Is this considered an ND?

buck460XVR
March 4, 2013, 08:24 PM
What a waste of a single primer.:D They are so difficult to find nowadays. Whenever I drop one of them wheil reloading, I get on my knees and sometimes belly just to find that single precious primer.



Sounds a lot like me, LOL......:D


I hate it when I hafta break open a new box of bullets/primers to finish the 50 rounds in the loading block cause I'm one short.

egg250
March 4, 2013, 08:25 PM
It went off as he picked it up? I'm not convinced. Static electricity...maybe. Bad enough to do that kind of damage? I'd think to build up that kind of pressure the primer would have to be somewhat containerized.

Otto
March 4, 2013, 08:33 PM
That happened to a guy over at calguns. He simply touched the primer tube to the press and boom. The best explanation was a static discharge from his body through the primer tube to the press. It blew the tube apart but he was ok.

Yarddog
March 4, 2013, 08:37 PM
rc is right,, Got to be more to story. The only primers I ever had go off was with a wack a mole Lee Loader ; )
Y/D

nojoke
March 4, 2013, 08:55 PM
This is the second time in less than a year I've read of this happening.

Not a lot....but....:eek:

EDIT; ok, more than a year.... http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=495909

Otto
March 4, 2013, 09:01 PM
This is the second time in less than a year I've read of this happening.

EDIT; ok, more than a year.... http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=495909

Yeah, that's the one I was referring to. The photos made the thread alot more convincing...too bad Photobucket removed them.

witchhunter
March 4, 2013, 09:20 PM
Don't use the vacuum cleaner to pick up live ones......

Safetychain
March 4, 2013, 09:32 PM
This is definitely static electricity. The static charge buildup typically can be well over a thousand volts. It will ignite powder which will burn if not confined and burn quickly if confined. the primer compound will not burn, it explodes and no confined space is required to throw the anvil one way and the cup the other. This typically doesn't happen because the electric arc has to actually hit the primer compound itself and not the cup or anvil. However, as we all know, lightning (a very large static discharge) most often hits the highest object, but not always. Read the fine print on the package of primers and wear protective glasses.

45lcshooter
March 4, 2013, 09:33 PM
Sounds like an accident to me. I've dropped them on the concrete floor, bounced off the bench, nine went off. Had some old ones that I took a hammer to on new years eve, bad idea. Shards everywhere and all cut up.

kingmt
March 4, 2013, 09:33 PM
I've zapped them with a fence charger for about an hour & they didn't go off. I can't buy it.

ole farmerbuck
March 4, 2013, 09:38 PM
Sounds like an accident to me. I've dropped them on the concrete floor, bounced off the bench, nine went off. Had some old ones that I took a hammer to on new years eve, bad idea. Shards everywhere and all cut up.
NINE or NONE went off? I would have quit after the 1st.

barnbwt
March 4, 2013, 09:38 PM
So I guess the lesson is to get one of those grounding matts they use for circuit soldering...:p

Everyday it seems I feel wiser for single-loading everything. Tip out those primers one-atta time

TCB

Drail
March 4, 2013, 09:40 PM
Carpeted floor and sneakers?

ole farmerbuck
March 4, 2013, 09:48 PM
Carpeted floor and sneakers?
I do, guess I'd better be careful.

c.latrans
March 4, 2013, 10:08 PM
I'm sorry.....but.....REALLY???!

gamestalker
March 4, 2013, 10:12 PM
Wow, I've never heard of anything like that happening with a primer. I once dropped a case of them, and a good 200 or so went bouncing all over the place, but none have ever detonated. I've also crushed more than just a few over the years too, with nothing ever happening. And I have de-primed hundred of live primers with never a det.. I'm sorry, but in my opinion, it sounds like maybe the version he gave you was slightly embellished?

GS

lightman
March 4, 2013, 10:19 PM
I'm with RC here, I'm not seeing it. Like t hear the rest of the story! Lightman

gfanikf
March 4, 2013, 10:21 PM
Is his hand made of det cord? I mean even I'm not that neurotic that I'm worried that touch can make them go kaboom.

icanthitabarn
March 4, 2013, 10:40 PM
A guy in the large LGS around here told me they had video of a guy touching a bullet, on the range, and it exploding. He said it wasn't the first time. :confused:

oldreloader
March 4, 2013, 11:15 PM
Once again... I'm with RC on this one.

788Ham
March 4, 2013, 11:17 PM
I've got one of those interlocking rubber mats from Harbor Freight in front of my bench, good padding to stand on, no sparks jumping around.

Jim K
March 4, 2013, 11:27 PM
Static electricity produces high voltage, very low amperage. I kind of wonder if something else was not involved, like trying to remove the anvil from a primer to use it in a Berdan primed case.

Jim

Trent
March 4, 2013, 11:29 PM
Static setting off a primer????

Man.. I dunno.

Not saying it didn't happen, just saying it's one of those things that I'd have to see.

Now, I *did* set a sock on fire with primers once. I had termites get in to a box of primed brass stored in the garage at an old rental house, washed the empty primed brass in the kitchen sink to get the mud out of them, then soaked them for 3 days in a tub of water.

Then fired them. (ALL of them fired.)

Anyway it got noisy when I was firing them (magnum large rifle), and my wife was complaining.

So I stuck a sock in a sock and stuck that over the end of my barrel.

BANG.

BANG.

BANG.

Smoke..

BANG..

More smoke

BANG...

Flames!!!!!

Oh crap I set my rifle on fire!

(Stupid human tricks)

GaryL
March 4, 2013, 11:33 PM
If it was static - it would be very difficult to get it to go into a primer rather than around it on the metal case. However, setting off primer dust would probably be pretty easy, which could chain react into the primers. Which suggests the importance of maintaining a clean machine.

Certaindeaf
March 4, 2013, 11:50 PM
I wonder if his bench top is rough or something.. maybe past projects resulted in/rendered parts of his bench to resemble glued down sandpaper grit and he scraped one face down across it.

James2
March 5, 2013, 12:44 AM
I agree, a static discharge.

There are static prevention floor mats and wrist bands available. Those who work with sensitive electronic gear have long used them. If you ever find yourself drawing a spark from something in the reloading room, it may be appropriate to add some prevention.

Rollbar
March 5, 2013, 01:51 AM
Good read. I am setting up a bench and don't have the funds for a mat (new reloader here). What about a leash and the bench tied to a outlet ground in the house/my reloading room.

Here in Nevada it is dry and walking across the carpet even barefooted draws an arch as well as outside needing to hold the metal part of the ignition key and touching the metal of the car for a discharge upon entering/exiting. :what:

Thanks,
Jim

nojoke
March 5, 2013, 09:09 AM
"....grounding matts they use for circuit soldering...."

This is what I installed. :cool:
I'll post pics later.

leadchucker
March 5, 2013, 10:02 AM
I can't seem to find the sources for this, from Wikipedia, so I can't speak for its accuracy.
Lead styphnate is particularly sensitive to fire and the discharge of static electricity. When dry, it can be readily detonated by static discharges from the human body. The longer and narrower the crystals, the more susceptible lead styphnate is to static electricity.

It might pay to take controlling static electricity seriously. Grounded equipment, anti-static mat to handle primers on, anti-static wrist strap when handling them. I also give all the plastic parts of the primer feed an occasional squirt of anti-static spray.

You can buy conductive spray, designed to add some electrical shielding to plastic housings of electronic equipment. I've not gotten that extreme yet.

I used to work in an electronics lab. No carpets. Even anti-static floor mats. Standard procedure there was to touch an anti-static pad next to the workbench when you sat down at the bench, before you touched any sensitive electronics.

gamestalker
March 5, 2013, 10:44 AM
I forgot about that incident posted on Calguns. Now I'm starting to wonder if i need to do something to neutralize static in my reloading room?

GS

ole farmerbuck
March 5, 2013, 10:48 AM
Maybe a shot of Free Breeze on the floor and in the air once in a while?

fguffey
March 5, 2013, 11:25 AM
The Cal Guns primer tube was KI-RACK chopped, when a reloader drops a primer tube full of primers the first thing he should do is make that sound, the worst thing a reloader can do when dropping a primer tube is grab/reach for it. Did the Reloader on Cal. Guns reach for the primer tube?? Yes, as in a CSI search, the ruptured primer tube matched the hole in his hand. Back to the electrons jumping to the primers, WHY? Electrons traveling down the tube would not jump off the tube and onto the primers ‘IN THE CENTER OF THE TUBE'!!!'.

Anti magnetic, unknown phenomena to reloaders, the primer cup is metal, metal conducts electrons, the primer cup protects the bang part of the primer by conducting electrons around the cup.

Primer tube, same thing, static electricity will not travel though the primers, the path of least resistance is through the tube. Elections will not jump to the tube unless it has a way to get to ground.

The primer pressure created in the Cal. Guns accident pushed primers in two directions, pre-ignition knock? Two flame fronts? The primers in the center of the tube went first, the fold in the tube became a rupture.

Dillon is in the business of testing, if a primer could be set off with static discharge of electrons they would be successful in their attempt, I did not ask them if they have tested plastic or glass tubes instead of metal, by reducing the conductivity of the tube electrons could be forced to travel through the metal primers.

Again, one day I decided to set a primer off, I started with Lee’s automatic hand primer and Federal primers, then I moved the the RCBS Auto hand primer, 2 hours later, finally I set one off, the primer was convoluted/waded-up/folded before it went off.

F. Guffey

ranger335v
March 5, 2013, 11:34 AM
"Seems that as he picked up a Large Rifle Primer from his bench, it went off..."

I wasn't there, so ... maybe... but?

Voltage, of itself, doesn't mean a lot. Electrical currents matter but only in the path of electron flow. The priming pellet is metal covered by the brass cup and a strudy brass anvil is pressed into the cup's skirt. There is no visible way for the VERY weak current of a static charge to pass through that pellet, current would have no place to go that the brass wouldn't do more easily so the current from a static discharge would be expected to flow around the pellet, not through it. And, even if it did, it's highly unlikely to have caused it to detonate.

I suspect there's more to this story than has yet been told.

mdi
March 5, 2013, 01:44 PM
New one to me too. I've read of testing primers for "static electricty discharges", and the testers used an arc from an electrode (bare piece of #10 solid copper wire) to a grounded primer. None exploded. But then I have no written factual reports available to confirm this, but I believe it...

GaryL
March 7, 2013, 07:03 PM
Here's a video of what it takes to set off BP and Smokeless with an electrical spark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm6PEdBcQ6s

Jurist
March 7, 2013, 07:21 PM
Me thinks there's more to this than met the eye.lol

SlamFire1
March 7, 2013, 08:01 PM
Primers are not as predictable as we wish they would be. You are dealing with something that is a mixture of a number of different chemicals and it is not "stable".

Primer goes off in a Purse!
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/bullet-explodes-inside-woman-purse-shoots-her-leg-232052308.html

By Eric Pfeiffer, Yahoo! News | The Sideshow – Tue, Jun 12, 2012

A Pennsylvania woman was shot in the leg while shopping at a local department store on Tuesday. But in a nearly unbelievable twist, no gun was involved. Apparently, the woman was carrying the bullet in her purse, when it mysteriously exploded.
"She did not have a gun in her purse or on her," Montoursville Deputy Police Chief Jason Bentley told the Williamsport Sun-Gazette. Bentley said the woman, whose name has not been released to the public, "was not aware" she was carrying two or three bullets inside her purse at the time of the accident.
The 56-year-old woman was taken to a local hospital and was eventually discharged. In fact, the woman initially declined medical treatment, only heading to the Williamsport Regional Medical Center after her son reportedly encouraged her to do so.
"Something must of hit the primer of one of the bullets," Bentley said. "The bullet stayed in the purse, but its casing put a hole in the purse and caused a minor leg wound."
Bullets exploding outside of a gun are a rare occurrence but are not entirely unprecedented. In March, a bullet being used as evidence in a court case exploded in a bag and shot 20 feet across a courtroom. No one was hurt in the incident. It was surmised that the bullet exploded after its tip bounced against another bullet tip in the same evidence bag, according to the Telegram & Gazette.

This is the BAM friction chart, unfortunately it is a 3D chart, of the current mil spec primer mix. The stuff is mixed wet and as it dries out it takes less energy to ignite. You can look at the different color bands and see the probability of ignition given an energy input and % moisture.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Reloading/Primer%20Sensitivity/ImpactEnergyofMilSpecPrimercompositionV1.jpg

35 Whelen
March 7, 2013, 11:25 PM
Nor have I in 50 years of playing with primers, studying all things reloading I could lay hands on, and most all things ammo related.

Methinks there might be More to this Story then what the neighbor told you! :scrutiny:

rc
+1

Isn't it funny how in decades of people handloading you never, ever, heard of incidents such as this UNTIL the internet came along. I typically let my reloading room get cluttered and the floor covered with tumbling media, 22 LR cartridges, elk hair, unburned powder and spent as well as a few stray live primers, then once or twice a year vacuum it all up with my big Craftsman shop vac. If those conditions won't set off a primer, nothing but percussion will.

Like many others, I smell a rat....

1SOW
March 8, 2013, 02:17 AM
Isn't it funny how in decades of people handloading you never, ever, heard of incidents such as this UNTIL the internet came along. I typically let my reloading room get cluttered and the floor covered with tumbling media, 22 LR cartridges, elk hair, unburned powder and spent as well as a few stray live primers, then once or twice a year vacuum it all up with my big Craftsman shop vac. If those conditions won't set off a primer, nothing but percussion will.

I suggest you do a simple test. Wear protective face covering and gloves.
Put "A" primer in a metal container and subject it to a still glowing match stick. When the heat gets close it'll go bang and startle you. Anvil will fly separately from the case.

"IF" a spark from any heat source including static discharge gets to the open end of the primer, it'll go bang.

Federals will go at lower temps than others due the minute amount of nitro-G included in the formula. Ref.: MSDS at Fed Primer site .

ArchAngelCD
March 8, 2013, 02:32 AM
I don't know, 4 days and 49 posts and the OP has not returned. Me smells something fishy... Like I eluded to back in post #5, I have my doubts this happened as told.

fguffey
March 8, 2013, 10:05 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SlOXowwC4c&feature=player_embedded

F. Guffey

10 Spot Terminator
March 8, 2013, 10:50 AM
Let us not forget people that companies such as Remington and several others who design military firearms have built firearms with electric ignition systems in them . Static electricity gets far and away severely hotter than 110 volt household current ( electric fence scenario ) . Dont think so ? Get yourself hit by lightning one time and if you survive it odds are you will have changed your mind. I worked in a high voltage manufacturing facility for nearly 20 years and saw plenty of examples of what static electricity can do. Have had those days when the atmospherics were just right and everytime you touched something you got the snap and at times were definitely hotter sparks than others and at times hot enough you can hear it when it goes off. Can static electricity set of a primer ? I would be willing to bet it can . Would be curious what brand and exact model primer that got the poor fella. All primers not being equal and all that. I suspect may have been a magnum series designed to burn hotter with a more volatile makeup than others to begin with. Ever notice how even in the earliest days you never saw a metal primer flipper tray or primers packaged in metal containers. Why do you suppose that might be ???

10 Spot

rcmodel
March 8, 2013, 10:58 AM
Black powder caps come in metal tins.

What would make them static proof when primers aren't??

http://premiumpowderandpyro.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/004.362220502_std.JPG

rc

fguffey
March 8, 2013, 12:23 PM
Today, 11:50 AM #52
10 Spot Terminator
Member


Join Date: February 6, 2008
Posts: 198 . Ever notice how even in the earliest days you never saw a metal primer flipper tray or primers packaged in metal containers. Why do you suppose that might be ???

10 Spot



“Why do ‘I’ suppose that might be???”

When loading primer tubes I use a large flip tray, the flip tray is large enough to cover the large trays used by Federal, I have no clue what the capacity of the large flip tray is. I have dumped 300 primers into it with room to spare.

The large primer flip tray I use is metal and has to be expensive, with a metal lid. Stamped and or injected plastic is cheaper to manufacturer.

F. Guffey

GaryL
March 8, 2013, 05:34 PM
Ever notice how even in the earliest days you never saw a metal primer flipper tray or primers packaged in metal containers. Why do you suppose that might be ???
A number of reasons actually. Originally they were wood and paper. Now they are plastic. I would not be surprised if that plastic has carbon or some other conductive material mixed in to dissipate static electricity. In fact, I'm fairly certain of it with the Winchester primers. Plastic does not need to be black to be static conductive. Plastic is preferable over wood for that and other reasons, like cost.

Anyway, the main reason for using plastic over metal is safety. It is much less lethal as shrapnel, and it tends to absorb shock, so a little less likely to propagate an explosion.

X-Rap
March 8, 2013, 10:01 PM
If it was static electricity I wouldn't ride to the gas station with that guy. Be handy out in the woods when it came time to light the lanterns though.

toiville2feathers
March 9, 2013, 12:31 AM
I've had a thought about the primer explosion. could it be that he was using,or someone else was in the vicinity using a cell phone. If you filling your car at the gas station have you ever noticed the warning about cell phone use. There is a reason for posting it there and it isn't for entertaining ready while you waiting to get it full.
Just a thought

Sun Tzu warrior
March 9, 2013, 12:58 AM
Sounds to me that your neighbor was making a detonator out of a shell casing,and it went off while he tried to crimp it, I had a neighbor loose a finger "because a chicken feeder fell on it" yeah that's it.....
As a child (10 years old) I had a 12 ga shotgun primer go off on me, an empty case, no powder, no shot.
Just me, a vice, the empty 12 ga shot shell, and a phillips screw driver..... the anvil stayed in my hand for over 30 years before I had it removed. I didn't even remember the incident, I guess I blocked it out of my memory, (I was afraid to tell dad what I had done) until I saw the X-rays all those years later. It may not be as bad as I first described, but I would be willing to bet, as in my case, it was self inflicted!

Fguffy, I have always purchased precussion caps in a metal containers. I am absolutly certain they are more suseptable to static electricity, than primers. There is more to this story than even the OP is aware of.

kingmt
March 9, 2013, 09:42 AM
I've had a thought about the primer explosion. could it be that he was using,or someone else was in the vicinity using a cell phone. If you filling your car at the gas station have you ever noticed the warning about cell phone use. There is a reason for posting it there and it isn't for entertaining ready while you waiting to get it full.
Just a thought

Yes. The reason is there slide stupid. Next their going to tell us that refilling bottle will cause cancer.

They don't even post no smoking signs at the pump here anymore.

fguffey
March 9, 2013, 12:54 PM
Today, 01:58 AM #58
Sun Tzu warrior
Member


Join Date: June 24, 2012
Posts: 66

Fguffy, I have always purchased percussion caps in a metal containers. I am absolutely certain they are more susceptible to static electricity, than primers. There is more to this story than even the OP is aware of.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last edited by Sun Tzu warrior; Today at 02:20 AM.



Sun Tzu Tzu, thank you for that information, I have three tins of percussion caps, I have never found percussion caps in anything but tins (small, round metal cans), the percussion caps are allowed to rattle around and bounce against each other, it has been that way from the beginning, I have one tin that has the appearance of having been walked on, the tin looks like a Kessler can of solder paste. The oval top is no longer convex-ed, the bottom is dented but no ignition, I would only guess the tin will support more weight than a fiber box, and if disaster struck the tin could contain the damage inflicted on the abusive user. Then there is the seal, there is no way to seal a fiber carton, a good fitting metal lid would fit a good metal fitting cup/tin, in the old days that is all they had. I am sure they had static electricity in the old days, as sure as I am static electricity was present I am sure the ride was rougher, and I am convinced the tin was less likely to be crushed, the tin is the better choice.

Again, I use a metal flip tray,

In the old days explosions were not uncommon, DuPont on the Brandywine, would not allow dogs on the premises, workers did not want to take a chance on being buried with the remains of dog.

http://www.cowart.info/Florida%20History/Dupont/Dupont%20Biography.htm

F. Guffey

brickeyee
March 9, 2013, 02:00 PM
I'd think to build up that kind of pressure the primer would have to be somewhat containerized.

Primers contain actual high explosives.

Lloyd Smale
March 10, 2013, 08:36 AM
aint happening. Something else hes not admitting was involved.

Reloadron
March 10, 2013, 09:15 AM
For what it's worth:

Electrostatic Discharge Testing
of Propellants and Primers. (http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/servlets/purl/10131328-BhnQsR/native/10131328.pdf)

SANDIA REPORT
SAND92-2416 • UC-742
Unlimited Release
Printed February 1994

Apparently the Sandia Nation Labs played around with this subject. Take it for what it is or is not worth.

Ron

Trent
March 10, 2013, 10:56 AM
Interesting link Ron.

Note how they set up the test; the got the spark THROUGH the priming material.


The test configuration used for the percussion primers was very similar to the powder
fixture. In this case, the primer was placed on the steel base plate and the discharge
needle was inserted through the flash hole into the primer,taking care not to short the
electrode to the primer case (Figure 4). No plastic cup was used. Some of the primers
were supplied installed in shells. In these cases, the primer was removed from the
shell. In the case of the 50-caliber shell,the primer could not be completely removed.
To allow access to the flash hole, the shell was machined to expose the primer.
Placing the needle electrode through the flash ho'e ensured that the ESD stress was
delivered to the interior of the primer. In actual use, it is unlikely that an ESD stress
would be delivered in a similar fashion. The tests, performed by discharging the ESD
simulator into the interior of the primer,served to identify the sensitivity level of the
material used in the primer and not necessarily the primer(as an integral unit) itself.


Of note, NONE of the commercial sized primers that were tested, ignited at human attainable levels of static electricity, despite being shocked directly through the primer material.

The primers which ignited at human levels are;

20mm electric
30mm
Large Rifle (Electric)

None of the percussion smaller primers went, including 50 BMG and 20mm arsenal primers.

Reloadron
March 10, 2013, 12:40 PM
None of the percussion smaller primers went, including 50 BMG and 20mm arsenal primers.

Yeah, that was the part I found interesting. Try as they did they were unable to get a detonation on any of the primers we have come to know and love.

Having been in electrical engineering for over 40 years I have learned that electricity including electro static discharge, does not always behave the way we think it should. Every now and then we see something happen that just sort of defies the logic of the beast.

However, with that said, I still do not see a primer detonating from being touched or even drawing a small ESD arc.

Ron

Certaindeaf
March 10, 2013, 01:05 PM
I wonder if Sandia could test that spontanious human combustion business. probably not

X-Rap
March 11, 2013, 11:25 AM
I used to keep all my primers in used pickle jars but when I knocked one off the bench it would take hours to seperate the primers from the glass, I went to the hardware and got some 3" pipe nipples and some caps and now they are safe and sound and with some teflon tape on the threads there are waterproof as well:scrutiny::rolleyes:
Never trusted that packaging that came from the factory.

fguffey
March 11, 2013, 12:47 PM
Today, 11:25 AM #67
X-Rap
Member


Join Date: September 23, 2006
Posts: 3,554 I used to keep all my primers in used pickle jars but when I knocked one off the bench it would take hours to seperate the primers from the glass, I went to the hardware and got some 3" pipe nipples and some caps and now they are safe and sound and with some teflon tape on the threads there are waterproof as well
Never trusted that packaging that came from the factory.
__________________
In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king


Somewhere out here is a warning, something about the danger of placing primers is a class jar, the same warning comes with ‘Hot Ice’.

Throughout this thread is a warning and or a caution, it has to do with confinement, a press on lid is better than a screw on lid, when something lets go I 'let it go’ I want no part of confining ‘it’ with anything that is going to allow resistance to pressure building. I do not know the tested strength of the 3” pipe, I do not know if the pipe is metal and or PVC.

Many years ago we made toys out or carbide, long baking soda cans with tight lids, we would punch a hole in the bottom of the can, add carbide, add spit, elevate the can, hold with our foot then light the gas escaping the hole. Most entertaining until an adult came along and thought we were having too much fun, Then there were the large bolt attached with one nut in the center, we cut match heads off, packed the area between the bolt heads then threw them.

Then there was the day we almost orphaned ourselves, when my son would ask to use a tool I ask “What for?”

F. Guffey

brickeyee
March 11, 2013, 01:58 PM
Static electricity has its own behavior.

It tries to spread the electrons out uniformly over a conductive surface.

if the charge entered the anvil, it would try to get to the primer cup, right through the primer compound.

Static sparks need a defined energy to ignite things though.

If you keep the energy level low enough nothing much happens.

It is not the voltage OR the current alone, but the combination of both to provide adequate ignition energy.

Static sparks can get up to 20,000 volts.the current is VERY low though.
Fractions of a micro-amp.

There are tables showing the energy of a spark to ignite all sorts of things.

Gasoline, alcohols (various types, flour, sugar, just about any flammable dust you can think of.

One of the 'tricks' is to make sure the source of any static spark will be VERY high impedance.
This limits the current that can occur.


There is still very likely more to this story though.

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