TSA to allow small nonlocking knives.


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hso
March 5, 2013, 05:39 PM
http://www.tsa.gov/pil-sharpobjects

Small knives permitted in carry-on luggage must meet all of the following requirements:

Permitted:

The blade must be no more than 2.36 inches or 6 cm in length – from tip to where it meets the handle or hilt
The blade must be no more than inch in width


Not Permitted:

Knives with locking or fixed blades
Knives with molded grips
Razors and box cutters

Since a locking blade is a safety feature we need to push to have the locking blade restriction removed.

http://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/tsa_permitted_items_update.pdf

BTW, pool cues and small "novelty" bats are permitted as well.

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Valkman
March 5, 2013, 09:04 PM
I saw this on TV, and I think golf clubs are included in this. Supposedly the people who work on the planes are objecting to these changes.

Jsg81
March 5, 2013, 09:29 PM
Looks like no more than two golf clubs. I could play a round with a 7 iron and a putter... Who in the world only brings two clubs?

Sam1911
March 5, 2013, 09:39 PM
Holy COW guess I've got some work to do to prepare that old novelty bat I have kicking around some place.

Sure glad there's no way to hurt anyone with a short stick of about 24" and 23 oz...



....

In completely unrelated news, Eskrima lessons seem to be suddenly full at the local dojo... :D

Piraticalbob
March 5, 2013, 09:40 PM
Looks like no more than two golf clubs. I could play a round with a 7 iron and a putter... Who in the world only brings two clubs?
Golfers are notoriously superstitious. Bringing a "lucky putter" or "lucky driver" onto the plane would be in keeping with this.

beatledog7
March 5, 2013, 09:45 PM
TSA will allow the sort of knife that almost nobody finds useful enough to carry, as if it's a big plus for travelers. It's diddly. Yet the flight attendants have their undies all in a wad over it.

I wonder what bigwig likes to carry a knife that has an exactly 6cm blade.

What happened to America?

USAF_Vet
March 5, 2013, 10:17 PM
Don't fly much these days, but if I did, I'd carry a cane. They can keep their tiny little Swiaa Army Knives (thats the only knife I have that fits this criteria), and I'll rsttle their brains with my hand made high density polyethylene club... I mean, cane.

Bobson
March 5, 2013, 10:22 PM
I need to buy a quality high density club. I mean cane.

I fly often enough to justify it, and I'll be spending lots of time in courts in the future.

USAF_Vet
March 5, 2013, 10:24 PM
I need to buy a quality high density club. I mean cane.

I fly often enough to justify it, and I'll be spending lots of time in courts in the future.
Send me your measurements and I'll make you one. PM me your e-mail address and I'll e-mail you pics of the two I've made.

OregonJohnny
March 5, 2013, 11:16 PM
So in doing some quick research, a knife that fits the TSA's new requirements and can be opened 1-handed is the Spyderco Squeak. It might be my next knife purchase. I do fly 4 or 5 times a year.

Any other 1-handed opening options out there that fit the specs? I know there are hundreds of good options if you don't mind a traditional 2-handed opener, but 95% of my folders are 1-handed, and I like the concept very much.

JShirley
March 5, 2013, 11:26 PM
There's also the Spyderco Kiwi (www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0049B0MYK/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0049B0MYK&linkCode=as2&tag=wanderin00-20). :)

John

ugaarguy
March 5, 2013, 11:45 PM
A few of the Boker Plus Chad Los Banos designed Subcom knives, and the David Curtiss dseigned Nano, are available as slip joints with the 42 suffix. However, I'm not sure if these knives exceed the blade width limit because they are pretty stout.

Bobson
March 6, 2013, 12:50 AM
Send me your measurements and I'll make you one. PM me your e-mail address and I'll e-mail you pics of the two I've made.
PM sent. Thanks man.

OregonJohnny
March 6, 2013, 12:55 AM
What do they mean by "knives with molded grips"?

Would the grip of the Spyderco Kiwi be considered molded?

RX-178
March 6, 2013, 02:03 AM
I'm finding it very difficult to see this as a good thing. Especially because...

Well, used to be, they saw a knife on the x-ray, they called a bag check, and ran through the standard procedure.

NOW, they spot a knife on the x-ray.... call a bag check, and... I guess they have to open it, measure it against a ruler, test the folding/locking mechanism, and then decide whether the grip is too comfortable to be allowed?

Bobson
March 6, 2013, 02:18 AM
I wondered about that too, RX-178. Specifically, how many incompetent TSA employees are going to be confiscating knives that people are allowed to carry under the new policy? From what I hear, the TSA has a reputation for hiring some real geniuses.

CapnMac
March 6, 2013, 02:53 AM
Actually, the specifications sound almost exactly like the Victorinox Gentleman's Companion.

Which would be something I carry more than EDC, if a person will allow that use of language. (I know I've had to check mine at the courthouse door/sally port.)

Could be TSA got tired of having buckets of $9.95 retail knives at the end of every shift.

Citadel99
March 6, 2013, 06:45 AM
I enjoy to carry a small Case knife on a daily basis and am thrilled that I can not have to worry about donating any more to TSA on my almost weekly flights.

Thankful for the first common sense I've seen from TSA.

Mark

Deltaboy
March 6, 2013, 07:32 AM
Hooray for Common sense.

Sam1911
March 6, 2013, 07:57 AM
If you look at the info TSA published: http://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/tsa_permitted_items_update.pdf

They'd consider ANY knife that has even the most basic ergonomic shaping to be "molded." The only knives they'll allow are the small "executive" type blades with nothing more complex than a basic lozenge shape.

So nice blades like the Kiwi are completely out.

JJEXP
March 6, 2013, 12:07 PM
The TSA can allow what they want through the metal detectors, but thats where their authority effectively stops. They have no jurisdiction over airline policy and the airlines will still have a strict no weapons policy (aside from FFDO, FAM, and a few others.) I'd imagine that anyone actually using their little penknife on a flight will be immediately removed and banned from the carrier.

WardenWolf
March 6, 2013, 12:18 PM
And nail clippers are still banned. Hooray for logic.

ThorinNNY
March 6, 2013, 12:26 PM
Sounds like it`s not likely to please very many people. As i understand it they won`t allow you to keep your little SAK key ring knife in your pocket, but it`s ok in a carry on bag! not likely to satisfy anyone who wants a knife for defense, Yet at the same time terrified airline people got their knickers in a knot about it!
Gooberment`s finest hour, eh what?

OregonJohnny
March 6, 2013, 12:46 PM
Oh my. After reading their very specific PDF guide to what is and is not allowed, I see the options are basically limited to very small SAKs and maybe some Case or similar designs. No fancy Spydercos or Bokers or anything fast or hefty. Not much of a victory, here.

Now I'm wondering, what does the height (top to bottom) of the blade have to do with it's "scariness"? Not more than 1/2"? Geez.

Bobson
March 6, 2013, 12:53 PM
I'd imagine that anyone actually using their little penknife on a flight will be immediately removed
That doesn't sound very fair. Do you think they'll at least wait to land the plane before removing passengers?

JJEXP
March 6, 2013, 01:10 PM
That doesn't sound very fair. Do you think they'll at least wait to land the plane before removing passengers?

I think they should do that more often. People are really going to shape up if they realize they might be deposited over the North Atlantic if they start acting up after a few cocktails

ThorinNNY
March 6, 2013, 01:18 PM
I can see a C&W ballad about that coming soon:

I went to the airport
to pick up Mama from the plane
but poor Mama got a little too high
an they hadda throw Mama from the plane
an now I`m standing in the cemetary
A-crying in the rain!

Ed N.
March 6, 2013, 08:59 PM
One of the benefits of capitalism: I'm sure that in almost no time Spyderco, CRKT, Buck, etc., will be offering a variety of "TSA-approved" pocket knives, with short legal-limit blades in full-size handles and with assisted opening.

JShirley
March 6, 2013, 10:31 PM
WardenWolf,

Where do you find that nail clippers aren't allowed?

John

Dr.Rob
March 7, 2013, 12:03 AM
Is one of those tire knockers a 'novelty bat' if I paint a Rockies logo on it?

hmphargh
March 7, 2013, 12:59 AM
WardenWolf,

Where do you find that nail clippers aren't allowed?

John
Not speaking for Warden, but it is a pretty common misconception, so much so that the TSA wrote a blog post about it: TSA Urban Legends (http://blog.tsa.gov/2009/05/tsa-urban-legends-nail-clippers.html)

michaelbsc
March 7, 2013, 03:42 AM
Since a locking blade is a safety feature we need to push to have the locking blade restriction removed..

To the authority types a locking blade is such a safety feature that it is completely outlawed in the UK. No self respecting regulator would ever move farther away from Europe's overregulation.

OregonJohnny
March 7, 2013, 12:54 PM
Other than the fact that it rules out thousands of perfectly good little pocket folders, can anyone come up with what the TSA might be thinking when it comes to their restrictions on:

1. Blade width (they mean height, from spine to cutting edge)
2. Locking mechanism
3. Contoured handle

I can understand the blade length limit, obviously.

#1 - But I can't understand what the height of a short stout blade like the Spyderco Squeak has to do with danger/safety. Isn't it physically easier to stab/puncture with a skinny narrow blade than a short stubby fat one?

#2 - And as far as a locking blade - can anyone imagine a scenario where a 2.36" blade with a spine lock is more deadly to a knife victim than a 2.36" non-locking blade? The only danger I see is to the user themselves if they're using the non-locking blade and have the blade close on their finger.

#3 - This one seems the most nonsensical. If a knife handle is shaped with slight grooves for your fingers to grip it, how is that more deadly or dangerous than a pill-shaped SAK handle?

I'm honestly trying to understand why these features are thought of as dangerous. Other than cosmetics, and safety to the actual knife user's hand, what differences do they make? It seems a little bit like the barrel shroud in the AWB debate.

Bobson
March 7, 2013, 01:44 PM
OregonJohnny, it seems to be about as arbitrary as many of the criteria that go along with banning "assault weapons." IMO at least.

steveno
March 7, 2013, 02:26 PM
so how many different blades will be allowed on a Swiss Army Knife? I think the range could be from 2 or so to a lot as in the case of the Champ?

michaelbsc
March 7, 2013, 02:31 PM
OK, I'm still trying to figure out what they mean by a contoured handle.

Is the fact that my little pen knife, that really amounts to no more than men's jewelry disallowed because the handle is curved to fit the curved blade?

Sam1911
March 7, 2013, 02:34 PM
Looking at the graphic they published, I'd imagine the answer to be yes. They seem to be saying "molded" means "not straight."

Speedo66
March 7, 2013, 04:50 PM
If you look at their diagrams here http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/03/tsa-prohibited-items-list-changing_5.html you will see that the slightest finger groove is excluded, and they show a Spyderco being specifically excluded.

Sad, the comments following it show people are afraid to travel because someone now might have a 2.36" dangerous weapon with them.

I guess the knowledge that they are surrounded by people carrying much more dangerous instruments everywhere they go would probably cause many of them to become shut-ins. :eek:

Once again, perception is everything. Molded handles indeed. :scrutiny:

hso
March 7, 2013, 04:59 PM
Hooray for Common sense.

Less stupid doesn't mean common sense.

StrawHat
March 8, 2013, 10:10 AM
I've got a couple of Barlows that would comply under the new rules. When I was traveling for business, I always had a knife in my checked baggage. Also, after the first trip out, one in my hotel room. Most of the time they were my Barlows. Now they could have made the trip in my pocket.

hmphargh
March 8, 2013, 02:58 PM
Aside from how arbitrary the restrictions seem, by my reading, I think that a lot of the small leatherman tools are in compliance, which makes me happy.

Unfortunately, I travel internationally frequently, and I'm pretty certain it will take a while before international airport security agencies follow suit, if at all.

Fryerpower
March 8, 2013, 03:05 PM
Most leatherman tools lock the tool in use open. That bans them under the locking blade provision. If you have one that does not lock you could be ok.

The 1/2 wide thing is going to cause problems. I thought that they meant wide when they said wide. Someone earlier said that they meant to say high (as in blade height). The knuckle head at the table with interpret it which ever way causes you the most grief.

Jim

hmphargh
March 8, 2013, 03:16 PM
Most leatherman tools lock the tool in use open. That bans them under the locking blade provision. If you have one that does not lock you could be ok.

The 1/2 wide thing is going to cause problems. I thought that they meant wide when they said wide. Someone earlier said that they meant to say high (as in blade height). The knuckle head at the table with interpret it which ever way causes you the most grief.

Jim
Some Leatherman tools lock the tool open, many of the smaller ones do not. The Leatherman Micra and Squirt I have don't lock the blade open, and I don't believe that the Style locks open either. Anything larger than those 3 is not permitted due to length anyway.

ugaarguy
March 8, 2013, 09:07 PM
After looking at it, I think it wouldn't take much design modification for Spyderco to turn the Cricket into a compliant slip joint.

weaponhead
March 8, 2013, 09:16 PM
....with a little grinding! :D

Valkman
March 8, 2013, 09:39 PM
I'm sure that in almost no time Spyderco, CRKT, Buck, etc., will be offering a variety of "TSA-approved" pocket knives

I saw today on FB that Ernie Emerson is working on one already.

hso
March 9, 2013, 01:05 PM
Every knife company "is working on one" as of the announcement. TSA compliant knives will be the next "big" thing for knife manufacturers.

OregonJohnny
March 9, 2013, 06:50 PM
After all of the very outspoken protests from pilots, flight attendants, and air marshals, plus the white house website petition they have going - do you think the TSA might reverse this decision?

Bobson
March 9, 2013, 07:31 PM
Do you think the TSA might reverse this decision?
Not until someone uses a "TSA Approved" knife in an undesirable manner.

What can be done with a box cutter that can't be done with a 2.36" bladed folder? Morons.

Its like banning only Glocks because someone committed a murder with a Glock - but a Ruger SR9 is still ok, because it isn't a Glock.

Let's ban Fords because they're the most often used cars in vehicular homicides. Ban Nikes because burglars wear them more than any other shoes.

Just as shoes, cars, and guns aren't the problems with crime in our society, neither are knives. That fact that they're allowing only certain knives is even more stupid than would be continuing to enforce the "No Knives" rule they've had for so long. All this is going to do is give them a reason to blame inanimate objects again down the road. Its only a matter of time before someone stabs someone else on a plane with a TSA Approved knife. Not because knives are the problem, but because its human nature.

Until they accept that simple fact, we're just going around in circles.

razorback2003
March 10, 2013, 02:33 PM
I'm glad i can at least bring my little leatherman style cs on the plane. That is about the only knife i carry because i keep it on my keychain. It is a handy knife that will do all i need to do as far as tasks that need a knife blade or scissors.

bubba in ca
March 13, 2013, 12:51 PM
i measured my Swiss Army daily carry and it is too long!

And a note to above comment--airline employees are not complaining about the new reg-- it was one of their goofball unions blowing smoke.

Incidently, tsa came up with the new reg for THEIR CONVENIENCE. Confiscating little knives was taking up too much of their time. I know, twice I was sent to secondary inspection for my titanium flashdrive which looks like a 1 1/2 inch Texas Chain Saw massacre weapon on their xray machine.

hmphargh
March 15, 2013, 07:12 PM
i measured my Swiss Army daily carry and it is too long!

And a note to above comment--airline employees are not complaining about the new reg-- it was one of their goofball unions blowing smoke.

Incidently, tsa came up with the new reg for THEIR CONVENIENCE. Confiscating little knives was taking up too much of their time. I know, twice I was sent to secondary inspection for my titanium flashdrive which looks like a 1 1/2 inch Texas Chain Saw massacre weapon on their xray machine.
I also have a Sandisk Cruzer Titanium (presumably the same flash drive), and I have had very similar issues, especially when it is in inner pockets of of my bag. One TSA agent was nice enough to show me the screen and explain that the clip looks very much like the blade of a knife on their machine. Since then, I removed the clip (it just snaps on and off), and I haven't had any issues.

On one earlier occasion, I was at Nantucket Memorial Airport (for those that don't know, this is a small airport that primarily services 8 passenger commuter planes), and the TSA agent told me that my flash drive looked like a "bogey" and proceeded to lean in and say that it looked like an explosives detonator. I haven't felt less safe flying than that day, knowing that this agent screened everyone that got on the plane, and I fly at least twice a week.

Zoogster
March 15, 2013, 09:05 PM
Bobson said:

What can be done with a box cutter that can't be done with a 2.36" bladed folder? Morons.


Box cutters are not a threat.

The real issue since shortly after 9/11 has not been the safety of the aircraft but the resistance of the flight attendants, and now the air marshalls that are mroe common as well.


Not too long after 9/11 they installed big cockpit doors. It was determined early on after this that knives no longer posed a risk to flights. They were going to relax the restriction within a year or so of 9/11.
The flight attendants quickly mobilized and opposed it. They didn't want the passengers they deal with to have knives.
The Union, which is thier representation, stopped removing the restrictions on knives.

This new change is actually much less than that.
When I flew before 9/11 I always had a knife. Typically a folder of 4"+ that I tossed into my carry on because I had had an issue one time out of many flights at some tiny little connecting airport that didn't like it on my belt taken off for the metal detector. As a result I had to check my bag to bring the knife, and to avoid that again I just carried it my carry on from then on until I got to my destination and it went back on my belt.
(You could have two carry ons for free then, and even a couple checked bags, but you ran the risk of checked bags getting lost or at minimum having to spend the time to go retrieve them at the destination. So carry on was better.)

The media was sensationalizing the box cutters being smuggled after 9/11 like they always do, truth is back then you could a big fixed blade hunting knife on with you if you wanted. As always they were short on facts and long on emotional appeal.
Additionally most meals on flights with meals had metal silverware they passed out and collected.
This included a metal butter knife that could easily be deadlier than a box cutter. Especially if you brought one of those quick manual sharpeners with you that you just stroke the edge through and it grinds it to something sharp. A butter knife would quickly become a serrated sharp fixed blade much larger than a box cutter.
Sometimes they even gave you a steak knife if it was a dinner with meat. Though you would be more likely to get something that actually needed a steak knife in first class/business class than coach.
Terrorists could have just flown first class, had a good meal, and been given steak knives.




Government after taking away a right rarely has a motivation to then go out of the way to give it back.
However in this case it has always been the flight attendants that kept knives illegal.
This new proposal while nice, and credit is due where it is deserved, is really a joke. Even a swiss army knife has blades too long to meet the restriction.

Also I find it rather humorous because I can bring things far deadlier than even a 4+" locked blade knife on a plane without bothering anyone. I won't get into a list of such things, that is how they get restricted. If people don't have enough imagination to figure them out then they probably are not smart enough that I want to encourage them to carry weapons anyways.
People just associate knives with being a weapon, and so take notice.
But even if I had a big locking folder on the plane if there was a deadly situation it wouldn't be the knife I would be going for.
With a variety of things I could clobber a flight attendant in one stroke, fracture a skull or knock them unconscious with other things far easier than trying to cut or stab them with some little knife. Not that I would of course.

But people are people. The masses associate certain things with being weapons, and are oblivious to much more dangerous things they don't associate with being weapons. That includes the flight attendants who don't want to have thier passengers with knives.

michaelbsc
March 16, 2013, 02:38 AM
I always bring things in my carry on that can be used.

I don't know who said it first, but I always liked the observation that "I am the weapon" someone made years ago. The "thing" is just a tool.

Deltaboy
March 17, 2013, 04:50 PM
The airline folks are all sheep and have traded Freedom for "safety".
With the restrictions I will have to carry my baby stockman which is so small that I lose it in my pocket.

JShirley
March 17, 2013, 06:50 PM
What can be done with a box cutter that can't be done with a 2.36" bladed folder? Morons.

Its like banning only Glocks because someone committed a murder with a Glock - but a Ruger SR9 is still ok, because it isn't a Glock.

Zoogster's points are valid, but a box cutter IS more dangerous in general than a small, non-locking knife. Someone holding a tiny SAK may in fact have more steel in that blade than a box cutter, but I would feel almost NO threat, while a box cutter can easily inflict a cut that will cause massive bleeding. It does in fact make some sense.

Also like zoogster, I have commonly carried items on airplanes that would have allowed me to (with forewarning, at least) dominate an encounter with someone who only was armed with a small knife.

Sam1911
March 17, 2013, 06:58 PM
Like, perhaps, a 24" "novelty bat" short stick? :)

JShirley
March 17, 2013, 07:03 PM
No. But one can, for instance, carry an empty 16 oz water bottle through security, or even just buy a full one once in the cleared area. Unlike a small knife, a full 16 oz bottle of liquid can deliver an instantly incapacitating blow.

There are other items, which like Zoogster pointed out, it's not a great idea to really discuss here.

T.A.DAVISON knife maker
March 20, 2013, 12:14 AM
Someone brought this up else were and maybe here too?
I have not read the whole thread here?

Anyway - If Delta Airlines says NO knives? Than how would they know if you have NO knife?
Unless they researched YOU after the TSA has already cleared you?
Would they set up another check point before boarding THEIR airline?

Here is a link to a video about Delta's wants?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-21731973
Just wondering???? I my self don't fly much..... I would rather ride my harley...

And just for kicks..... here is the first slip joint knife I made that fits the TSA guidelines...... :)
It was shipped to New York.


http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/486512_4942863123028_971788861_n.jpg

razorback2003
March 21, 2013, 11:23 AM
The airlines messed up by letting the govt take over the security at the airports and also letting the govt hassle their customers to no end to get on a plane.

Not too surprising that multiple airlines are going through bankruptcy.

You can't have a successful business with a ticked off customer base.

j1
March 21, 2013, 02:23 PM
They finally got damned near everyone used to the no fingernail clippers rule and now they change it all. Makes me wonder why?

JShirley
March 21, 2013, 05:55 PM
"No fingernail clippers" was NEVER a rule. That's a myth.

Anyway, this has an easy explanation: TSA's funding is being at least somewhat cut. Pulling out small, non-dangerous metal items is a time waster for TSA agents.

hmphargh
March 21, 2013, 06:02 PM
And just for kicks..... here is the first slip joint knife I made that fits the TSA guidelines...... :)
It was shipped to New York....
Todd, do you think you'll be making TSA compliant knives on a regular basis? I'd like to be on that list.

clutch
March 21, 2013, 06:13 PM
NOT that I'm going to jump though the hoops to fly commercial again in this lifetime unless my employer demands it. Would my cute little Gerber Curve make it on the plane if I removed the locking mechanism? I bought a lot of them to give as small gifts and have at least one I could modify.

http://www.garage-machinist.com/www/rimfirecentral/Gerber_Curve.jpg

The big screw driver blade will open control box interlocks and the small one tightens my eye glass screws. The knife cuts tape on boxes to break them down to recycle.

Speedo66
March 21, 2013, 07:59 PM
NOT that I'm going to jump though the hoops to fly commercial again in this lifetime unless my employer demands it. Would my cute little Gerber Curve make it on the plane if I removed the locking mechanism? I bought a lot of them to give as small gifts and have at least one I could modify.

The big screw driver blade will open control box interlocks and the small one tightens my eye glass screws. The knife cuts tape on boxes to break them down to recycle.

"Sculptured" handle may not pass muster. If you look at their examples, it takes very little curve to be disqualified.

Carrying that vicious implement capable of torturing people 8 different ways, what kind of person are? :rolleyes:

JShirley
March 22, 2013, 09:21 AM
That doesn't appear to be a "molded" handle, it just incorporates a bottle opener/carabiner.

j1
March 22, 2013, 10:38 AM
Now that everyone has knives aboard I want my gun for self defense.

JShirley
March 22, 2013, 11:01 AM
Funny. Of course, blades up to 4" were allowed before 9-11...

Fryerpower
March 28, 2013, 04:51 PM
I was in Madison, WI on business last week. While there I found a small knife (<2 inch fake Swiss Army knife with one blade, one file, one pair of sissors, a tooth pick, and a pair of tweezers) for $1. I figured I would give it a try.

Turns out the rule does not kick in until 30 April.

The lady who "helped" me load the tray did not catch it when I dumped the contents of my pockets into the tray. The three x-ray operators did not catch it. The guy at the place where you pick up your stuff did not catch it when I put everything back where it goes. He only saw it when I held it up in front of him and said "I bought this special, just for this trip." Only then did one of the security theater actors catch it. I feel so safe...

Jim

JTW Jr.
March 29, 2013, 12:14 AM
I always flew with a Fred Perrin Bracelet, Jones Bros Titanium & g10 Stylus , Anderson Titanium Yo-Yo and Rotring 600. Never had a problem with any of them on any flights :)

michaelbsc
March 30, 2013, 12:27 AM
What if it rains?

http://real-self-defense.com/unbreakable-umbrella/

The Rotring pens and pencils are awesome enough just to have for their own sake.

InkEd
April 21, 2013, 10:59 PM
Starting at the end of the month, TSA is going to allow very small pocket knives that meet certain parameters. I was wondering if you guys could name a few cool models for SD if needed.

As of now, I'm thinking it's still better to just bring a tactical pen but hopefully you guys can surprise me with one worth buying.

zxcvbob
April 21, 2013, 11:06 PM
Opinel #5 is about the biggest knife that's TSA-legal.

I just bought a Buck #385 "toothpick" so I would have a knife I could carry on a plane. It is *tiny*. It looks good, it was relatively cheap (unlike a Case toothpick) which was important in case I lose it. It came pretty sharp right out if the box, and the point is like a needle; I always thought new Bucks were shipped dull (maybe this one is sharp because it was made in China)

Getahl
April 21, 2013, 11:08 PM
I don't know if SD is going to be feasible with anything the TSA is allowing on flights. The blade length must be under 7cm, which works out to something like 2.3 inches, no wider (edge to spine) than 0.5 inches, cannot lock, and the handle cannot be 'molded', which I take to mean handle material cannot have finger grooves. This limits things to 74mm length SAKs, keychain multitools (Micra, Squire, Crosscut, Dime, etc), and small slipjoints, like the Case Peanut. I'm looking forward to being able to travel with one of my favorite pen knives, the Victorinox Classic, but I don't see it stopping a bad guy.

P.B.Walsh
April 22, 2013, 12:28 AM
My Buck Vantage Pro came razor sharp from the factory... in the USA.

Personally, I'd feel far more confident with a sturdy cane than a pen knife, and canes are widely allowed on planes, if not, they risk a lawsuit for violating the ADA (American with Disabilities Act). Now in terms of just having a knife, I'd pick a small multitool, preferably a smaller Leatherman mentioned above.

This step is absurd.... but it is a step.....

InkEd
April 22, 2013, 06:17 PM
The "molded grip" makes it about worthless. However, I can carry-on a fish bat without any problems. Morons!

bubba in ca
April 22, 2013, 08:01 PM
when I came back from Hawaii, I checked my SAK in hold baggage, but hand-carried an 18 inch hardwood crane statue with a beak you would not believe...I bought it as a work of art, not a weapon.

The govmint doesn`t like to admit that one of the reasons 911 worked is that passengers were told to not fight back. That held out till the people on the plane that crashed in PA found out the game plan from relatives on cel phones and jumped the terrs.

Lets recap the score:

1) The govmint, with its immense power and experience, stopped 0 terrorist planes.

2) The peons, unarmed and ignorant, stopped 1 terrorist plane.

Looks to me like the peons won by a score of 1 to 0.

zxcvbob
April 22, 2013, 09:08 PM
Idiots. (no, not you) http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57580853/tsa-delays-its-move-to-loosen-restrictions-on-small-knives-on-planes/

:mad:

hmphargh
April 22, 2013, 09:28 PM
Idiots. (no, not you) http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57580853/tsa-delays-its-move-to-loosen-restrictions-on-small-knives-on-planes/

:mad:
Best unintentional meaning quote here:
"The sister of the pilot on American Airlines Flight 77, Debra Burlingame, told CBS News last month she thought the TSA's plan was dangerous. Charles Burlingame was killed when his plane was hijacked and crashed into the Pentagon.

"Do you really think a terrorist can't make deadly use of these permitted items?" she said.

Sure, they can make deadly use of permitted items such as canes, umbrellas, children's toys, and plenty of things that are more nefarious with some simple electronics bought at Brookstone or InMotion than a silly little 2.36" knife.

Magoo
June 5, 2013, 07:55 PM
I hope you didn't spend too much on your TSA Special travel knife. :(

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/government-drops-plan-to-allow-passengers-to-carry-small-knives-bats-golf-clubs-on-airplanes/2013/06/05/a494a448-ce0e-11e2-8573-3baeea6a2647_story.html

I was impressed by the number of knives they confiscate per day (2000). Apparently they are going to continue to do so.

michaelbsc
June 5, 2013, 08:06 PM
I hope you didn't spend too much on your TSA Special travel knife. :(

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/government-drops-plan-to-allow-passengers-to-carry-small-knives-bats-golf-clubs-on-airplanes/2013/06/05/a494a448-ce0e-11e2-8573-3baeea6a2647_story.html

I was impressed by the number of knives they confiscate per day (2000). Apparently they are going to continue to do so.

Yeah, so I found out this past weekend.

Woman at the scanner was really proud that she found it buried in my luggage too. Not that I was hiding it, but it had been through security three times and no one said a word.

I just get all the clap-trap out of my pockets and inside my bag when I'm in the garage so when I get to the belt it makes the process faster. Then I reload my pockets at the gate instead of the security line.

Drives me nuts standing behind someone who is just learning the rules by trial and error.

JShirley
June 6, 2013, 03:17 PM
Damn.

Oh, well. I've carried things more effective than a 2" bladed knife onto flights for years.

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