357 SIG Reloads


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kerstingm
March 5, 2013, 10:37 PM
I am going to try my hand at reloading some 357 SIG rounds and want to see if anyone can give me any good advice? Been told this is a very tricky round to reload? I am not intimidated by it, I am just looking for a few pointers.
I also need to know do I want a Factory crimp or taper crimp die? I usually use the Factory Crimp for all my other reloads, but I have found both for this.
Also if you can tell me which dies are the better ones to get for this (if there is one that is better then another) I usually use Hornady for all of my reloading, but of course NONE IN STOCK, Midway HAD a set of Redding in stock till I did this post. (I swear I just went back and they were sold out)
Please any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

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Bovice
March 5, 2013, 10:53 PM
I used to load and shoot 357 SIG. The things you will want to know are these things.
1. The round headspaces on the shoulder. Adjust the seating die as far down as you can go.
2. Flat nose or JHP 9mm (.355) bullets are what you need. If you want full power loads, you have to use true full metal jackets. Plated won't work. Ask my chronograph how I know.
3. Expand just enough to barely start the bullet in the mouth.
4. Use a powder that completely fills your case as a backup. 357 SIG is notorious for bullet setback. A full load of AA #9 supports the bullet from the rear.
5. Use a Lee factory crimp and adjust the die down until you feel resistance and the mouth isn't flared. As long as you don't buckle the case neck, you didn't use too much crimp.

kerstingm
March 5, 2013, 10:57 PM
Thanks for the info, I was looking at the Lee dies, yet NOT IN STOCK either. Looking online now for some.

beatledog7
March 5, 2013, 11:04 PM
I've never understood how a very compressible powder can be said to support a bullet and thereby stave off setback.

Some .357 Sig loaders use a carbide .40S&W full length sizer (mine's an RCBS) to size the body and decap, avoiding the need for lube, then use a .357 Sig FL sizing die (mine's a Lee) to touch back the shoulders and size the neck. I find it works very well.

Bovice
March 5, 2013, 11:30 PM
Compressible, sure. There was some research and experimentation by one of our fellow members on AA#9, where even further compressing the load didn't change chrono velocities. The same is not true of most other powders.

kerstingm
March 6, 2013, 12:02 AM
Without going to my reloading manual is Titegroup a good powder for these? The wife usually does the pistol rounds and I do all the rifle, so I am not sure of what all powders she has stocked up, but I know that is what I have used for the 45ACP when I have helped. I also powder is getting very scarce lately, but I think we ALL know this.

beatledog7
March 6, 2013, 12:11 AM
What I mean is how can the powder keep the bullet from being set back? The powder would easily compress far enough to allow enough setback to cause significantly increased pressure.

danthearmyman
March 6, 2013, 01:08 AM
There's a train of thought that if the powder fills the cartridge, then the bullet won't be as EASILY set back. Sure it can still happen, but every bit of resistance helps right?

I personally have been doing fine with just a light crimp on mine.

I use Blue Dot powder, and it fills the case up pretty well.

I'd steer clear of RCBS dies. I'm in the middle of re-tooling one because they seem to have a knack for being over-length in the 357 sig dies. Can't speak on the others, but I plan on ordering some hornady ones soon.

JimKirk
March 6, 2013, 01:10 AM
AA#9, 800X, HS6(W540), Longshot, Power Pistol, Bluedot and other powders work well in the 357 SIG... The one thing you have to watch for is bullet setback... because there is so little neck to hold the bullet to start with... also you need a bullet profile a that has a longer flat side section to use in the SIG ...the Hornady .355 XPT bullet is a perfect shapped, the Hornady HAP bullets work well. .... I don't flare because I want all the neck tension I can get.... the only problam is getting the bullet to set straight and not fold/crush he brass ....

ReloaderFred
March 6, 2013, 01:11 AM
A full load of AA-9, combined with sufficient neck tension (it has a very short neck) will prevent setback in 357 Sig. At least it has in the 13,000+ rounds of it I've loaded.

Hope this helps.

Fred

kerstingm
March 6, 2013, 01:18 AM
So far the only end's I have found in stock anywhere arsaset of Lee at Cheaper Than Dirt. Will look a bit more tomorrow, but don't want to wait to ling with this market.

david_r
March 6, 2013, 01:45 AM
dies? Buy them. Don't wait, don't think about it. Don't wish for a $100 set of blue or green ones. Buy them and load.

Even with the run on reloading components, I can still buy AA#9 and #7. $25 a pound sure beats $27 -$40 a box. The 357sig, pricewise, has always been a round to reload.

david_r
March 6, 2013, 01:48 AM
What I mean is how can the powder keep the bullet from being set back? The powder would easily compress far enough to allow enough setback to cause significantly increased pressure.
Why do you believe the powder is compressible at the forces we are dealing with? Brian Pfleuger tested this. It isn't. IIRC, he was able to apply enough force to bulge cases with the powder.

JJ-
March 6, 2013, 06:41 AM
Some .357 Sig loaders use a carbide .40S&W full length sizer (mine's an RCBS) to size the body and decap, avoiding the need for lube, then use a .357 Sig FL sizing die (mine's a Lee) to touch back the shoulders and size the neck. I find it works very well.

This is what I do ^^^^
I use RCBS .40 full length carbide die, then I use Lee 357 sig full length die, then lee expander, seat, & factory crimp. For what it's worth Unique works very well in my Sig

kerstingm
March 6, 2013, 06:49 AM
Thanks for the info, doing your listed steps how long does it take to load say 100 cartridges? Just curious, not like I break any land speed records when I reload any of my cartridges.
thanks again for the help

beatledog7
March 6, 2013, 10:15 AM
david_r,

I located the Pfleuger thread about this on The Firing Line, and I see the point he's making. I'll read it thoroughly at some point.

I'll just stick to proper neck tension to avoid setback.

JimKirk
March 6, 2013, 03:09 PM
The actual neck length of the 357 SIG is only 0.15" long.... < 5/32 of an inch ... 3.81 mm

That is not a lot to hold a bullet in place .... that is a better reason for a case full of powder under the bullet....

I'm not in the habit of loading and unloading my 357 SIG ammo ... If I put it in the magazine ... I usually shoot it .... I have no problems with set back... I could see a Police officer who has to unload/reload the same ammo over and over again having setback problems ....

david_r
March 7, 2013, 02:51 AM
kerstengm,
Natchez has Lee 357sig dies in stock. CTD can pound sand. Being from ********** and living in the county that sounds like a city they won't ship to, I have a special dislike for them so if I can steer someone elsewhere, I sleep better at night.

kerstingm
March 7, 2013, 05:54 AM
David, thanks that was the one place i needed to check, and I totally agree with you on them.

twice barrel
March 7, 2013, 09:11 AM
Get the Lee dies and a Lee 40 S&W carbide sizing die. As stated by others; this works great and I did not have any problem with unlubed cases.

I loaded just for the range and enjoyed 5.2gr Hodgdon Universal under a Berry's 124gr plated HP. Set up dies as normal and experienced no difficulty in reloading the round. This is the only loading I've tried to date but I ran about 300 rounds thru my XDm 40 with a Storm Lake 357 Sig barrel without incident. For me it shot better than it did with the factory 40 S&W barrel so the pistol is now a 357 Sig going forward. I gave it and my reloading setup to my son for Christmas so I cannot offer any additional experience to you. Good luck!

Regards,

TB

http://www.natchezss.com/brand.cfm?contentID=productDetail&brand=LE&prodID=LEE90270&prodTitle=Lee%20357%20Sig%20Steel%203%20Die%20Set

kerstingm
March 7, 2013, 09:24 AM
Get the Lee dies and a Lee 40 S&W carbide sizing die. As stated by others; this works great and I did not have any problem with unlubed cases.

I loaded just for the range and enjoyed 5.2gr Hodgdon Universal under a Berry's 124gr plated HP. Set up dies as normal and experienced no difficulty in reloading the round. This is the only loading I've tried to date but I ran about 300 rounds thru my XDm 40 with a Storm Lake 357 Sig barrel without incident. For me it shot better than it did with the factory 40 S&W barrel so the pistol is now a 357 Sig going forward. I gave it and my reloading setup to my son for Christmas so I cannot offer any additional experience to you. Good luck!

Regards,

TB
Trust me I know what you are saying I prefer the 357 Sig over the 40 CAL any day of the week. Less recoil, twice as accurate (in my opinion of course) Just wish the ammo wasn't so fricken expensive. I got really lucky right after I purchased the barrel, Cheaper Then Dirt had some critical Defense rounds on sale with shipping for $15 and change, I purchased 20 boxes at the time I jsut could not pass that deal up. I am not going to just use these for plinking rounds either.
Thanks for the info.

james nicholson
March 7, 2013, 11:23 AM
Lots of good info for 357 sig can be
found at "Pete's 357 sig page" I would
have posted a link but I don't know how.

kerstingm
March 7, 2013, 12:04 PM
Thank you for the info, figures this round has it's own page, following
Lol

mtuckrn
March 7, 2013, 12:59 PM
Does anyone reload 357 SIG with Berry's 124gr HBFP using Blue Dot?

With components in limited supply these days, this is what I have to work with. I'm trying to work up a load that stays under 1250fps. Data on this combination is very limit and I do not currently have a chrono available to test my loads.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

~mtuck

danthearmyman
March 8, 2013, 04:03 AM
I'm using that combo...or have been. Just switched over to Berry's hp's. I'd have to look in my notes, but I think I was around 9.5 grains. But I wouldn't take that as the gospel.

kerstingm
March 8, 2013, 08:00 AM
I have used 55gr fmj Berry bullets for my .223 reloads and haven't had any issues with them. Been told that Berry bullets are not the best out there, but there again I have noticed any issues with the. They load, they go bang, they go down and exit the barrel.

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