Remington 1100


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AWCherry
March 7, 2013, 08:59 AM
So I have the chance to pick up another firearm. This is the 3rd this month, but I've gotten them all as incredible deals, and this one seems to be another of the kind. A gentleman who previously sold me his Remington 788 in .308 has now put a Remington 1100 on the table, with ammo, for ~$250. This seems like a really good deal. Remington.com lists the 1100 variants all around $1000. To pay a quarter of that seems pretty swell, to say the least. Now, I have no experience with shotguns in any capacity other than tactical varieties during my military time. If anyone can answer for me some of my questions, I'd be eternally grateful.

1. What is the primary designed purpose of this gun (skeet? waterfowl?)? I don't know much about shotgun chokes and slugs/shot yet, so I'm trying to educate myself.

2. Can I use different loads and still expect reliable function? AKA - I want to go shoot clay with birdshot and deer with slugs without swapping barrels and still have it cycle reliably?

3. Will any round in particular (I know it's not rated for anything above 2 3/4") harm the gun through routine use? Should I avoid high powered rounds?

4. To those that have the 1100, do you wish you went with a different model?

Thanks for any replies and experiences.

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Birdhunter1
March 7, 2013, 09:20 AM
If it is rated to 2 3/4" shells then it should fire many thousands of rounds. As long as the 1100 isn't rusted and all beat up it sounds like a good deal. The consumable parts on an 1100 are the oring and maybe a gas ring every 10 years of heavy use. Keep the bolt and the rails it slide on lubed with something thin that doesn't collect dirt (do not use wd 40) and keep the mag tube under the forearm clean and free of lube.... if that gums up you will have cycling issues.
The intended use of the 1100 is everything from clays, deer, geese, law enforcement, or anything else. Most trap or skeet versions were heavier and had a monte carlo stock. I have seen a few english stock upland version and there are a lot of lightweight or light contour versions. All in all the 1100 is a heavy gas operated shotgun and as such absorbs a lot of recoil and should be very easy on the shoulder. My dad has had one since the mid 60's in a 20 gauge.
To shoot 3" it shouldn't require anything more than a barrel swap. The mag barrels had a smaller hole for the gas port as to not hammer the crap out of everything with added pressure. Someone will correct me if I am wrong but I do not think the 1100 was made with a receiver specifically designed for 2 3/4" shells, if there was it was probably a very early model or a trap version

Spawn91
March 7, 2013, 09:28 AM
1100's are great guns! I own a mint condition 1100 handed Down from my gran pappy and a 1187 sp.. Like he said, keep it cleaned and lubed, I recommend rem lube in the spray can.. Good stuff..

oneounceload
March 7, 2013, 02:42 PM
For the price, I would grab it. While the design is about 60 years old now, it still is a functional one. As mentioned, the 1100 was built and sold in a variety of models and versions for different applications from skeet to deer to waterfowl. Because it does not have a self-regulating gas system like newer guns (Beretta), barrel swaps are necessary to shoot heavy loads for deer and waterfowl versus skeet or upland birds like dove.

Do NOT put any lube on the mag tube where the piston and o-ring rides, it will eat the o-ring (learned that the hard way). I had issues with my 28 gauge breaking firing pin retention springs as well as the retaining clip that holds the charging handle in place - minor issues, but a PITA nonetheless

returningfire
March 7, 2013, 03:31 PM
Buy it, buy it, buy it! Then try it out, and if you don't like or need it, sell it for a profit and buy something you want with that money.

slowr1der
March 7, 2013, 03:38 PM
I agree with the above posters. I would grab it at that price as long as it's in good shape. It's a great deal and a great gun.

Now, that being said, the market value on used ones is usually $350-400 in this area for ones in excellent shape. Slightly more for a Magnum edition. So it's still a great deal, but it's not really a quarter of what they normally would bring.

tuj
March 7, 2013, 04:08 PM
I love my 1100.

Skylerbone
March 7, 2013, 04:24 PM
At the asking price it would be a steal IF it's equipped with Remchokes. For a fixed choke barrel however I'd only consider it a good buy, assuming it were the particular bore I wanted.

Deer_Freak
March 7, 2013, 05:01 PM
My issue with the 1100 is the gas rings. Having to reconfigure the gas rings each time I changed loads did not sound appealing to me. I know several people that own 1100's and the like them. There is a gun for everyone. The 1100 is the gun for a lot of people.

HarcyPervin
March 7, 2013, 05:04 PM
My issue with the 1100 is the gas rings. Having to reconfigure the gas rings each time I changed loads did not sound appealing to me. I know several people that own 1100's and the like them. There is a gun for everyone. The 1100 is the gun for a lot of people

Not to discredit you, but I think this is more of a problem for some and less for other guns. I have an older 1100 that grandpa left hanging out in the barn. It's marked for 3'' only and I go from 3'' mag steel to light target loads without making adjustments. The action is noticeably slower, but it still cycles just fine.

dbarky
March 7, 2013, 05:34 PM
I have a 1100 trap with thousands of rounds through it and no prblems. Had a 20 ga. 1100 hunted quail for years and no problems. Take care of it and it should serve you well. If it is going to be your only shotgun for clays and deer you might look into a barrel with the rem chokes. Skeet would be best with Improved cylinder, trap with full choke. Slugs will shoot through any choke. You might google shotgun chokes for a better understanding of chokes and there uses for different targets. 2nd other comments and totally agree with no wd40. Rem oil is good stuff. Enjoy

1KPerDay
March 7, 2013, 05:45 PM
Not to discredit you, but I think this is more of a problem for some and less for other guns. I have an older 1100 that grandpa left hanging out in the barn. It's marked for 3'' only and I go from 3'' mag steel to light target loads without making adjustments. The action is noticeably slower, but it still cycles just fine.
My 3" Mag 1100 won't cycle target loads with the 3" barrel. But it will just fine with a 2.75" barrel.

Deer Freak, I didn't know you could change the configuration of the o-rings in the 1100. :scrutiny:

In any case, $250 for an 1100 in good shape is a steal, IMO.

Skylerbone
March 7, 2013, 07:05 PM
Improved cylinder in a Remington is .001 restriction and is the only standard choke that should be used for rifled slugs. For a sabot slug, Remington makes a rifled tube as well as fully rifled barrels.

I've owned my 1100 since 1986, purchased new for $375 or so (at wholesale). It has somewhere in the neighborhood of 5-6k rounds through it and has never failed excepting early on when I inserted the rings in reverse order (made it a single-shot). All parts are still original.

greyling22
March 7, 2013, 07:29 PM
1100 is a great gun, and that's a good deal. Not spectacular, but good. I grew up with remington guns, so I'm biased, but I think they have the best lines and really like the ergonomics. Mine will digest walmart shells all day long without a hitch. I've never tried slugs, and I suspect you will need a different barrel for that. or use a rifle.

The barrel will have something stamped on it somewhere like "mod" or "imp cyl" that tells you how tight a pattern it will shoot. Tighter the pattern, the farther it's effective range, but the more likely you are to miss what you are pointing at.

http://www.typicalshooter.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/shotgun-choke-ranges1.jpg

Virginian
March 7, 2013, 07:39 PM
There ain't no gas ring reconfiguring with an 1100. My '63 still has the 'O' ring I installed in about 1967 so I wouldn't lose the original metal 'V' ring. That gun was my Skeet League gun, so it has seen a few rounds. The gas system IS self compensating, but only within chamber length. A 2-3/4" 1100 will shoot any 2-3/4" shell from Magnums to mouse fart loads.
$250 for one in very good or better condition is a good deal and then some in my opinion. I have had 12 Model 1100s/11-87s since 1963, and still have 5, including the original.
There are newer gas system designs that are more flexible, or will go longer between cleanings. However, I like everything about the 1100 enough that I have not found a total package I like better. Also, I will not own an unreliable gun - at least not for long.

chas08
March 8, 2013, 11:35 AM
My issue with the 1100 is the gas rings. Having to reconfigure the gas rings each time I changed loads did not sound appealing to me.
There's nothing to reconfigure in my 1100, I've never had a problem! Great gun at a great price buy it!

1KPerDay
March 8, 2013, 11:52 AM
Improved cylinder in a Remington is .001 restriction and is the only standard choke that should be used for rifled slugs.
why?

Skylerbone
March 8, 2013, 02:10 PM
Why? For the same reason we don't reload bullets meant for a .38 in a 9mm. In the case of a shotgun, you've got a thin wall barrel, a 1 oz. solid lead projectile and a whole lotta pressure behind it. Using a choke tube with even tighter restriction is an attempt to squeeze that big chunk of lead down to a smaller size, not safe and certainly won't help accuracy.

As mentioned before, Remington makes a rifled tube for sabot only as well as fully rifled barrels. Imp. is what is needed for rifled slugs.

oneounceload
March 8, 2013, 02:26 PM
Skeet would be best with Improved cylinder, trap with full choke.

Actually SKEET is the best choke for skeet (.005) and MODIFIED (.020) for trap from the 16 yard line

Improved cylinder in a Remington is .001 restriction

UM, this would be INCORRECT. Improved Cylinder is .010, NOT .001

In the case of a shotgun, you've got a thin wall barrel, a 1 oz. solid lead projectile and a whole lotta pressure behind it. Using a choke tube with even tighter restriction is an attempt to squeeze that big chunk of lead down to a smaller size, not safe and certainly won't help accuracy.

Somewhat correct. While it is true that accuracy from a full choke with slugs will typically be garbage, it is not unsafe, the lead just squeezes down to go through the choke

jogar80
March 8, 2013, 04:15 PM
I LOVE my 1100!! I had been shooting several other SA and pump shot guns years ago for bird hunting. Once I borrowed my uncles Oooold 1100, I knew I had to have one! It fits great so I end up hitting a lot more than with any other shotgun. It's also a soft shooter! I do notice the action starts to get sluggish after about 100 rounds. At that point, I just spray it down with Gunblast and follow up with RemOil and im back in action. If I know im going to be shooting A LOT, I make sure I carry those two things into the field with me. I give it a proper cleaning when I get home.

I say definitely buy it... sounds like a great price for a great gun to me

1KPerDay
March 8, 2013, 04:21 PM
Why? For the same reason we don't reload bullets meant for a .38 in a 9mm. In the case of a shotgun, you've got a thin wall barrel, a 1 oz. solid lead projectile and a whole lotta pressure behind it. Using a choke tube with even tighter restriction is an attempt to squeeze that big chunk of lead down to a smaller size, not safe and certainly won't help accuracy.
That's what the "riflings" on rifled Foster slugs are for. That is why they came up with the "rifled" slug in the first place. So the lead can swage down and be displaced behind it when shooting them through chokes. You realize they don't spin, right?

Virginian
March 8, 2013, 07:48 PM
You can shoot any slug thru a fixed choke. Slug, not ball. Slugs were designed with fixed chokes and guys who didn't know better in mind. Sabots will not be as accurate in a fixed choke barrel generally. Anything thru an overbored barrel is likely to not be real accurate. The most accurate smoothbore with slugs I have ever seen had a fixed modified choke. You may need to experiment to see what combination your gun likes best.

rsrocket1
March 8, 2013, 08:09 PM
I paid $350 after DROS for my 1100 two years ago. This one was at least as old as the one I originally bought new for $199 35 years ago which was stolen in 86 :(.

I wouldn't say it's worth $1000, but it will shoot as good as any $1000 gun so long as it's in the right hands. I put about 3,000 rounds through it last year and it has worked flawlessly.

Liberty1776
March 9, 2013, 12:44 AM
ja buy it yet? ja buy it yet? ja buy it yet? cause you should have... especially for that price...

Sav .250
March 9, 2013, 07:34 AM
When the 1100 came on the market.....it set the standard. Do some google search on it.
Information will bring you up to date.

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