Bullseye & Hornady


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MikeS.
March 8, 2013, 07:17 AM
I have several hundred Hornady 45 caliber 230 grain XTP/HP bullets and a whole bunch of bullseye powder. Hornady doesn't list Bulleye for the 230grn bullet.

Looking at other bullet types in 230grn other manuals show as high as 6.0grns of Bullseye.

Does anyone see a problem if I load with 5.5 g of Bullseye?

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hey_poolboy
March 8, 2013, 07:50 AM
I'm just starting to work up some loads for the same bullet. I plan to start mine at 5.0 gr. I've seen some data that lists Bullseye max @ 5.0, but also lists the start load the same....I've also got some loaded up with w231.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

curlymaple42
March 8, 2013, 07:55 AM
I run 5gr of bullseye. Works great!

Sent from my DROID RAZR

Mike 27
March 8, 2013, 12:30 PM
I can't get to it right now but I thought I saw it listed in the 9th edition. Maybe I'm wrong.

Fishslayer
March 8, 2013, 12:40 PM
I run 5gr of bullseye. Works great!


^^^ This. Don't recall the OAL but I seat the bullet to about .010-ish from the shoulder.

beatledog7
March 8, 2013, 12:43 PM
Yep, 5.0 grains of BE.

rcmodel
March 8, 2013, 12:44 PM
5.5 BUllseye with any 230 would be a +P load.

GI mil-spec with a 230 FMJ-RN was 4.6 - 4.8 depending on who you talk too.

The XTP has a longer bearing surface then a 230 FMJ-RN, so more bore friction.

I'd stick with 5.0 and see how it does.

rc

witchhunter
March 8, 2013, 11:18 PM
5.0 Bullseye works goot!

LUCKYDAWG13
March 8, 2013, 11:22 PM
i use 4.8 in my XDS with 230gr castboolits works just fine

rcmodel
March 8, 2013, 11:27 PM
Castboolits (whatever that is?) and Hornady XTP's are entirely two different things pressure wise.

Not saying 4.8 Bullseye and a 230 XTP would not be a safe and effective load.

Just saying one is not the same thing as another every time.

rc

LUCKYDAWG13
March 8, 2013, 11:29 PM
a cast boolit is i bullet made of lead

Skylerbone
March 8, 2013, 11:37 PM
I'd recommend starting at 4.6 gr. 4.8 gr. Bullseye with the 230 XTP has worked fine for me though not my preferred powder.

BYJO4
March 8, 2013, 11:40 PM
I use 5 gr Bullseye with my 230 gr FMJ from Precision Delta.

rcmodel
March 8, 2013, 11:52 PM
a cast boolit is i bullet made of lead I know what a castboolet is.

It is a new name for Cast Bullets invented by a web site a few years ago.

I prefer to call them cast bullets, just like I had been doing for 40+ years before the new website changed the name from Bullet to BOOlet.
Or whatever it is?

But that's just a personal thing with me.

It ticks me off no end! :cuss:

Never mind!
Excuse me!
It's way past my bedtime.

And I need to go clean my Shotty.

rc

LUCKYDAWG13
March 9, 2013, 12:06 AM
sorry there rc will try to be more P/C politically correct if it helps you

ljnowell
March 9, 2013, 01:19 AM
5.0 is Alliants max with Bullseye and a 230gr JHP. I have seen data in the past that went to 5.5gr and called it +p. Personally I dont think Bullseye is the proper powder to do a +p loading in any caliber, nor is +p usually worth it.

MikeS.
March 9, 2013, 02:15 AM
Thanks guys, I'll start with 4.8 and see if it'll work upto 5.0.

Fire_Moose
March 9, 2013, 02:58 AM
Weird, I better ask this....

My 9mm reloading book says a Max of 4.9gr bullseye with a 124gr bullet. How can it be so close to a 45 round?

Sent from my CZ85 Combat

ljnowell
March 9, 2013, 03:31 AM
Weird, I better ask this....

My 9mm reloading book says a Max of 4.9gr bullseye with a 124gr bullet. How can it be so close to a 45 round?

Bullet weight, case capacity, etc, all impact that. There are lots of examples where a 9mm bullet would take more of a certain powder than a 45acp. Its just what it is. There is a lot more to it than the charge weight.

Fire_Moose
March 9, 2013, 04:12 AM
I'm just doing a couple calibers so it kinda caught me off guard.

Sent from my CZ85 Combat

Havok7416
March 9, 2013, 05:05 AM
I use 4.7 grains of Bullseye for my plated loads and they do just fine.

powell&hyde
March 9, 2013, 05:59 AM
Here is a scan from my Midway book.

Pete D.
March 9, 2013, 06:46 AM
5.0 and a 230 gr. bullet is a classic load.
Pete


PS - Minor hijack here. sorry there rc will try to be more P/C politically correct if it helps you
I am with RC on this little irritant. It is not a matter of being PC; its a matter of knowing how to spell.
The other one that irritates me is when people use caliber (a measurement) when they mean cartridge (an object). It boggles my mind that people who can be precise enough to tell you the OAL of a cartridge to three decimal places call the thing a caliber.

kingmt
March 9, 2013, 10:17 AM
I don't remember the OAL but charge was 4.5gn & 5gn was kinda hard on the gun.

Trent
March 9, 2013, 11:11 AM
I usually run 4.8gr of Bullseye in a progressive with 230 gr. It drops between 4.7 and 4.9 depending on the temperament of the press at the moment.

On my Remington 230gr SWC match bullets (which are jacketed .452 and have to be seated deeper) I cut it down to 4.5gr, as the capacity is a little reduced.

Those get a lot of mileage per pound, over 1500 loads per pound. :)

357Shooter
March 9, 2013, 11:17 AM
I've been shooting 4.5 with XTP's & Zero's 230g HP for years, works great for me and easy on the gun (Kimber CDP). I never saw the need to go full bonzo with a 45, it doesn't seem to gain you much.

GaryL
March 9, 2013, 12:33 PM
My 9mm reloading book says a Max of 4.9gr bullseye with a 124gr bullet. How can it be so close to a 45 round?Well, ljnowell mentioned a couple things. But just for grins, lets do a little math and see what is happening. Typical 45acp pressures are in the range of 10K-20K psi, and 20K-35K psi for 9mm. A lot more pressure acting on 9mm, so people often think a lot more force on things. But force is the result of pressure acting on an area, so lets assume the 9mm and 45acp are both seeing 10K psi (at some point in the process they will).

f = area x psi
10K psi, 9mm = 0.355", 45acp = 0.451"

9mm, f = 989.80 lbs
45acp, f = 1597.51 lbs

So 61% more force acting on the 45acp bullet.

Now we need to consider friction holding back the bullet. This isn't quite as simple, so we'll make a couple of assumptions, which will be good enough to get us in the ballpark. We'll assume the bearing surface length for both is about the same, and the friction per unit area is also about the same. That means we can reduce relative friction to a comparison of the circumference of the bullet.

9mm, l = 1.12"
45acp, l = 1.42"

So 27% more holding force due to friction on the 45acp bullet.

Here is where the math and physics get interesting. Now, I don't know exactly how much force is required to push a bullet through a barrel, but lets assume 500lbs for the 9mm, which is quite a lot. The 45acp would be ~27% higher, or 635lbs. So the net force available to accelerate the bullet is as follows:

9mm, f = 989.8 - 500 = 489.8
45acp, f = 1597.5 - 635.2 = 962.3

So the net force on the 45acp is ~96% greater, given this scenario. So it should be obvious that the 45acp bullet is going to move farther for a given amount of pressure, causing the volume behind it to expand accordingly.

arizona98tj
March 10, 2013, 12:02 AM
Hornady doesn't list Bulleye for the 230grn bullet.

Just checked my old Hornady manual.....they have Bullseye listed for their 230 grn FMJ bullet. 3.6 to 5.5 gr with a COAL of 1.200".

MikeS.
March 10, 2013, 03:12 AM
I tried 4.8 and liked the results so I loaded 200 rounds that way.

Thanks for all the info guys.

homatok
March 10, 2013, 02:37 PM
"Boolet"----On the plus side, next time you are faced with some idiot PC co. that blocks access to any site reffering to firearms, type in Cast Boolets and likely be pleasently surprized! Also the distinction comes in handy when doing a post that deals with both jacketed and cast bullets!

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