Ruger g.s. Scout rifle.


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krupparms
March 11, 2013, 01:18 PM
Just picked up a new ruger G.S.Scout rifle. It is fantastic! Ruger did a great job once again. Have had no luck at finding extra magazines, but I will keep looking. This is one nice rifle &I believe J.Cooper would be proud. Now if they would just build one in. 243win. & .223 rem.! You can not get them at the L.G.S. but I found mine at B-mart. They get 1per. week. :)

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Geno
March 11, 2013, 01:42 PM
Congrats! Those are awesome. They do make it in .223. I actually held one, as well as the .308. Both wonderful rifles.

Geno

natman
March 11, 2013, 01:45 PM
I beg to differ. I suspect that Jeff Cooper would be appalled. His specs for a Scout Rifle included "light and handy". The Ruger effort is heavy for a 308 carbine and has a magazine sticking out - way out - of the stock for styling reasons. Not very handy. Ruger could have easily made it with a lighter stock and internal magazine but decided not to for marketing reasons.

It's not a bad rifle, it's just not a good Scout rifle.

chicharrones
March 11, 2013, 02:03 PM
Congrats! Those are awesome. They do make it in .223. I actually held one, as well as the .308. Both wonderful rifles.

Geno

Where oh where did you hold one in .223? Any links with news about such a beast? :)

chicharrones
March 11, 2013, 02:06 PM
Just picked up a new ruger G.S.Scout rifle. It is fantastic! Ruger did a great job once again. Have had no luck at finding extra magazines, but I will keep looking.

I only see over priced polymer Ruger 5 and 10 round mags at places like Gunbroker. I have three 10 rounders on back order with rugershop.com using my 20% new gun purchase discount. Maybe, I will get them this summer? :confused:

Anyway, congrats on your new Ruger GSR. I do like mine for exactly what it is, whether it meets Cooper's scout rifle requirements or not. :cool:

chicharrones
March 11, 2013, 02:08 PM
deleted - off topic

nipprdog
March 11, 2013, 05:58 PM
Have had no luck at finding extra magazines, but I will keep looking


http://shopruger.com/Bolt-Action-Magazines/products/559/

:D

greenlion
March 11, 2013, 06:35 PM
I am curious about where you saw one in 223 as well. Did it use AR magazines by any chance ??? I have kept an eye out for one in other calibers, but haven't seen any evidence of them yet.

chicharrones
March 11, 2013, 06:38 PM
http://shopruger.com/Bolt-Action-Magazines/products/559/

:D

Dang, I thought the backorder drought was over! That's where my order for 10 round poly mags are currently in purgatory. :(

Yet, other mags are coming into stock so that's a good sign!

Dryft
March 11, 2013, 07:06 PM
The Ruger website does not have any information on a .223 version.

Congratulations on your new rifle - I want one in the left-handed model, stainless barrel.

Enjoy!

Averageman
March 11, 2013, 07:19 PM
If it's Ruger it is more than likely a proprietary magazine for that specific rifle.
I doubt if the 5.56 version even is set up to work with the Mini 14 magazines.
Think of the money Ruger makes in proprietary magazines and then making new and unique magazines for new designs on older rifles and pistols.
Old Bill was sly like a fox, I have a feeling the problem he had with Hi-Cap magazines was likely that he wasn't making enough money off the ones that were sold for his rifles.
Those Scout Rifles could have been designed to take AR or M1A magazines, but Millions of dollars would have been lost to Ruger had the done it that way.

Geno
March 11, 2013, 07:37 PM
Target Sports, Royal Oak, MI Ask for Ray. The .223 model had a 1-9 twist barrel.

Geno

Sheepdog1968
March 11, 2013, 08:21 PM
If it's Ruger it is more than likely a proprietary magazine for that specific rifle.
I doubt if the 5.56 version even is set up to work with the Mini 14 magazines.
Think of the money Ruger makes in proprietary magazines and then making new and unique magazines for new designs on older rifles and pistols.
Old Bill was sly like a fox, I have a feeling the problem he had with Hi-Cap magazines was likely that he wasn't making enough money off the ones that were sold for his rifles.
Those Scout Rifles could have been designed to take AR or M1A magazines, but Millions of dollars would have been lost to Ruger had the done it that way.
In the prototype phase of the 308 scout they tried the m1a mags but couldn't get reliable feeding.

Sheepdog1968
March 11, 2013, 08:23 PM
I beg to differ. I suspect that Jeff Cooper would be appalled. His specs for a Scout Rifle included "light and handy". The Ruger effort is heavy for a 308 carbine and has a magazine sticking out - way out - of the stock for styling reasons. Not very handy. Ruger could have easily made it with a lighter stock and internal magazine but decided not to for marketing reasons.

It's not a bad rifle, it's just not a good Scout rifle.
I'm guessing that's in part due to the price point. Over the product life cycle I suspect they will address some of the definicies. Of course there is always the Styer Scout.

sammass
March 11, 2013, 09:03 PM
Krupp,

Check out Alpha Ind Mfg and their Alpha Ruger GSR mag.

www.alphaindmfg.com

I have a couple and they are well made, and shorter than the Ruger 10 rd factory metal box mag. This is accomplished by double stacking the lower rounds with a single feed. Forget 308 stripper clips as either Ruger or Alpha box is loaded one round at a time. You just need more mags. The only commentable item is that the Alpha teflon finish is slick when you are removing the mag.

There are several YouTube vids out there on the GSR and one specifically on the Alpha.

Also, unless you like the tuning fork ping of the birdcage suppressor, you might consider the Smith Enterprise Vortex suppressor. Again, lots of visuals on their web site.

www.smithenterprise.com

Enjoy your GSR. Sam

baz
March 11, 2013, 11:51 PM
Dang, I thought the backorder drought was over! That's where my order for 10 round poly mags are currently in purgatory. When did you place your order? I placed an order very early in January, when the 10 rounders were still listed as backordered. No further info until they showed up about a month later! I bought two of the 10 rounders and two of the 5 rounders, from shopruger. I also have two of the Alpha Industry mags, which I ordered when I didn't have a clue as to when I would see the Ruger mags. So, now I've got 7 mags -- the original 10 round mag, the four new poly mags, and the two Alpha mags.

B!ngo
March 12, 2013, 12:13 AM
I recently sent an e-letter to Ruger customer relationships congratulating them on their success and asking them if they plan to pursue a .223 GSR. They actually did follow up two days later saying that at this time they have no current plans but will evaluate the market over the next few months.
So no, I don't think they make one. And I was hoping to get a left-hander too...
B

chicharrones
March 12, 2013, 12:15 AM
When did you place your order? I placed an order very early in January, when the 10 rounders were still listed as backordered. No further info until they showed up about a month later! I bought two of the 10 rounders and two of the 5 rounders, from shopruger. I also have two of the Alpha Industry mags, which I ordered when I didn't have a clue as to when I would see the Ruger mags. So, now I've got 7 mags -- the original 10 round mag, the four new poly mags, and the two Alpha mags.

I ordered them February 4th. Maybe mine will show up in a few weeks?

If not, I do like the steel mags shown in the link provided by sammass in post #15. I wish I'd know of them sooner. :D
http://www.alphaindmfg.com./store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=57

chicharrones
March 12, 2013, 12:18 AM
I recently sent an e-letter to Ruger customer relationships congratulating them on their success and asking them if they plan to pursue a .223 GSR. They actually did follow up two days later saying that at this time they have no current plans but will evaluate the market over the next few months.
So no, I don't think they make one. And I was hoping to get a left-hander too...
B
I did notice that the Ruger Hawkeye 77 Tactical rifle looks only a couple steps removed from the GSR. Mostly due to that flash hider hanging on the muzzle. It does come in .223 and .308.

http://www.ruger.com/products/m77HawkeyeTactical/models.html

BruceB
March 12, 2013, 02:52 AM
My left-hand GSR is flawless. The action is smooth, the trigger is light and crisp, and function and accuracy are excellent.

My polymer mags came from Midway, but that was almost a year ago. They work beautifully, and I find the 3-round perfect for carry, backed-up by larger ones in pockets.

It's a mistake, in my estimation, to cling too tightly to Colonel Jeff's original "formula". Look at the RIFLE! It meets the basic idea admirably, and nit-picking is pointless.

For myself, I dislike the forward-mounted scope concept; as a result, my GSR wears a receiver-mounted sight....just the way I like it.

To use a lighter stock is to use a WEAKER stock....the laminated one on the GSR is one of the FEW commercial items of which I'm aware that has a reasonable chance of surviving use for a full-force butt-stroke to an enemy's head.... or even an owner's fall on the rifle on rough ground, or a horse rolling on it. This is a hard-service concept, and such things should be considered.

As can be seen, I like the rifle and Ruger's execution of the basic concept.

natman
March 12, 2013, 03:29 AM
It's a mistake, in my estimation, to cling too tightly to Colonel Jeff's original "formula".

Not when the subject is how Jeff Cooper would feel about it.

As I said, it's not a bad rifle. I agree that it's sturdy and should stand up to a lot of abuse. If Ruger had called it the "Truck Buddy" or the "Service Max" or something similar I'd have no complaint. But they called it the "Gunsite Scout" which invites comparison to Cooper's Scout Rifle formula. Which it doesn't meet particularly well.

mastiffhound
March 12, 2013, 04:51 AM
I was going to go with the Ruger GSR as I love my Rugers. That was until I saw the new Mossberg MVP in .308 that takes AR10/SR25 mags. So Mossy will be getting my money, that's what you get for screwing us with proprietary mags Ruger. Mossy also saw that synthetic stocks were a good idea too with their Flex system. Although some of the Flex system is stupid you can get a traditional style stock configuration in synthetic. Smart again. It looks like the competition is heating up. I almost forgot, the Mossy is $300 cheaper too!

Geno
March 12, 2013, 05:52 AM
The MVP is a great little rifle! I have the 5.56, and it is very accurate. I can't imagine that their .308 model would be any less impressive.

Geno

krupparms
March 12, 2013, 01:29 PM
I have not seen or heard of the Mossberg MVP. It sounds like I will be looking for one to check out. The Ruger G.S. Scout rifle may not be what J.Cooper would have built. But that was an ongoing project & I think he would have liked what Ruger did with his concept! It has everything I like, except the magazine issue. I would have preferred military mags that would have been cheaper &more available. But that's a small issue. I have got a great rifle &at the end of the day I am happy with it! And that's what's counts! Thanks for the links for extra magazines! I do appreciate it! Now if I can just find that .308 ammo I put away somewhere! ;)

Averageman
March 12, 2013, 06:13 PM
In the prototype phase of the 308 scout they tried the m1a mags but couldn't get reliable feeding.
I would imagine the engineer's were hard at until the cash register rang.
I dont begrudge them making a buck and I have heard the same thing before, I just don't see why it couldn't have been done.
I would imagine the same thing was said about the Mini and the Ranch Rifles too!

wlewisiii
March 12, 2013, 06:16 PM
I beg to differ. I suspect that Jeff Cooper would be appalled. His specs for a Scout Rifle included "light and handy". The Ruger effort is heavy for a 308 carbine and has a magazine sticking out - way out - of the stock for styling reasons. Not very handy. Ruger could have easily made it with a lighter stock and internal magazine but decided not to for marketing reasons.

It's not a bad rifle, it's just not a good Scout rifle.
T
This ^ Especially the mag issue. After test firing one, that alone was enough to convince me that I didn't want one. Perhaps if it took M1A mags for .308 or STANAG in .223 it would be worth putting up with them sticking out like that. But for a single stack proprietary magazine? Thanks but no thanks, I'll stick to a mauser type internal stripper fed magazine instead.

baz
March 12, 2013, 06:42 PM
Not when the subject is how Jeff Cooper would feel about it.

As I said, it's not a bad rifle. I agree that it's sturdy and should stand up to a lot of abuse. If Ruger had called it the "Truck Buddy" or the "Service Max" or something similar I'd have no complaint. But they called it the "Gunsite Scout" which invites comparison to Cooper's Scout Rifle formula. Which it doesn't meet particularly well.Other than weight, what's your beef with it? They didn't call it a "Gunsite Scout" rifle on their own. Their use of the name has the approval of Gunsite. Not everyone shares your view of what Cooper might have thought about it:Late last year Ruger demonstrated its confidence in the new Scout rifle by holding a formal rollout at the scout rifle’s breeding grounds: Gunsite.
...
Most participants, many with military or law enforcement backgrounds, found the new rifle quick-handling, practical, accurate and generally appealing throughout the exercises, and some appeared downright convinced not only of the scout concept’s validity but that the new Ruger was the best factory scout to date, especially when price was taken into consideration.
...
From even a cursory study of Cooper’s writings, though, it is likely he would have appreciated the new Ruger for exactly what it is—a well-executed, reasonably affordable scout rifle from a major U.S. factory gunmaker. More importantly it is likely that the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle will earn a place among scout rifle aficionados and converts alike who will realize they no longer have to settle for anything else.

Source (http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/ruger-gunsite-scout-review-3/).

HOOfan_1
March 12, 2013, 07:03 PM
My understanding is they use Accuracy international magazines...not proprietary

krupparms
March 12, 2013, 09:40 PM
Good catch HOOfan! My magazine is marked with Accuracy Inl. markings! You are right. I was woundering why mine was not marked RUGER!

ECVMatt
March 13, 2013, 01:50 AM
I have had a GSR for quite some time now. It is a great rifle and works well for me. It is super accurate, has a good trigger, strong action, iron sights, and two different scope mounting positions. The mag thing is over done. They tried to use the M14 style mag, but it did not work. They went with Accuracy International mags and they did. As an aside, I used modified m14 mags in my Ruger Frontier and it more or less sucked. Yes it worked, but was hard as hell to chamber rounds. The AI mags feed like butter. They are also available from many sources other than Ruger. I have steel mags, but would also like to try the Ruger poly mags.

I really don't Think Cooper would be aghast at the sight of a Ruger GSR. It was developed at his beloved Gunsite with major input from their top instructors. While it might not be a "pure" scout, not many are. Cooper himself often pointed out the difficulty in producing them at reasonable cost. I think he would be more pleased with a broader embrace of his ideals than to nitpick the small points.

natman
March 13, 2013, 03:11 AM
Other than weight, what's your beef with it?

The magazine sticks out too far for styling reasons.


They didn't call it a "Gunsite Scout" rifle on their own. Their use of the name has the approval of Gunsite. Not everyone shares your view of what Cooper might have thought about it:

Yes, I'm well aware that once Jeff Cooper was safely dead, the current owners of Gunsite sold out to Ruger. But you have a good point; it's perfectly fair to say that the GSR conforms to the current Gunsite ownership's idea of what a Scout rifle should be. It just doesn't conform to Jeff Cooper's idea of what a Scout rifle should be.

Perhaps we should look at what Cooper himself thought about it:

I do not pretend to own the English language, and I do not claim to own the term "scout," but the scout rifle concept is mine, and I know what I mean by it, even if others do not. The essential element of the Scout Rifle, as I see it, is "friendliness," combined with all−purpose utility. The piece should be short, light and handy, and still dispose of sufficient power and range to accomplish any reasonable task in the hands of a skilful rifleman.

Jeff Cooper's Commentaries, No 10, Vol 12 page 62
[emphasis added]

So I think it's fair to say that unless a rifle is short, light and handy, it doesn't fit Jeff Cooper's idea of what a scout rifle should be.

Well, at least the GSR is short. No amount of talking is going to make it light and handy.

BruceB
March 13, 2013, 05:24 AM
I almost hate to break this to you, but to SOME of us the GSR IS "short, light and handy".

Spend a few years (or many) hauling full-size FALs, M14s, or even such things as Model 70 or Springfield '03 sporters, and there is a VERY REAL difference in the GSR.

It's a fact of life in firearms design that if one intends to have the capability for even limited 'sustained fire' (a possible requirement of a GSR), a certain amount of STEEL is needed to resist the effects of heat build-up. I consider the GSR to meet that need with a bare minimum of weight for its role in MY armory.

Of course, I'm ex-infantry, so my opinions were formed "in the field", as it were..... not from magazines or textbooks.

natman
March 13, 2013, 08:30 AM
I almost hate to break this to you, but to SOME of us the GSR IS "short, light and handy".

The point is not whether or not the GSR meets MY definition of a Scout rifle or YOUR definition, but Jeff Cooper's definition. This is well documented and the GSR simply does not meet it. Period.

If you can find something in Cooper's writings that supports the contention that he would consider an 8+ lb (with the magazine, scope and sling, not Ruger's advertised weight) 308 carbine "light" or a magazine that protrudes several inches beyond the trigger guard as "handy", then I'll be glad to reconsider.

The point that seems to be universally missed is that the GSR is a good rifle for lots of applications. If you are happy with yours, more power to you.

It just doesn't conform to Cooper's idea of a Scout rifle, no matter what semantic gymnastics you perform in a vain attempt to make it so.

W L Johnson
March 13, 2013, 10:02 AM
The Ruger effort is heavy for a 308 carbine and has a magazine sticking out - way out - of the stock for styling reasons.

That keeps killing it for me. @$%#! mags reminds me of a Sailboat Fin Keel.

baz
March 13, 2013, 10:22 AM
The magazine sticks out too far for styling reasons. I don't see "style" in "short, light, and handy," though I will concede that to some the long magazine might detract from how "handy" they perceive it to be. But if that's the case, there are now the 5 round polymer magazines to address that, and even help a bit with the weight.

I concede, too, that tricked out with a scope and sling, and a five round polymer mag, the rifle is still likely (I have not done any scientific analysis) to be a bit above the upper end some times quoted for the weight of a "legitimate" scout rifle (7.7 lbs). But not by much. And if that is all that is left of criticizing it, then it comes close to the Cooper ideal.

Then the question becomes what Cooper might have thought about that. And no one knows. Not even you. The OP made a point about what he thought Cooper would think of the GSR. You disagreed. I cited a source to suggest that others think Cooper might have like the GSR. You still wonder about that. And that's all we can do, unless Cooper speaks to us somehow from beyond the grave.

Meanwhile, let's shift the focus of the debate a bit. It seems that the idea of a scout rifle, along the lines conceived by Cooper, has become, or is becoming, a popular notion among shooters. So the question I have is this: If the idea is popular, and Cooper's criteria are so determinative of what we think the scout rifle should be, then why aren't there more commercial rifles that satisfy the criteria? The benchmark is the Steyr, of course, but it is very expensive. Is that the problem, that Cooper's criteria are hard to satisfy in a mass produced rifle, without going to a lot of expense? Besides having some specific ideas about what a scout rifle should be, I think Cooper would have wanted it to be available to everyman as well, and not a rifle just for the elite. And maybe that is just not possible, without some compromises.

In the end, no one knows what Cooper would have thought about the GSR. Perhaps he would have approved, on the grounds that while not perfect, it was close, and at half (or one third) the price of a Steyr, made it more accessible to the common man. Who knows?

Moreover, while Cooper "owned" a particular definition of a "scout rifle," the idea antedated his formulation. So while the GSR might not meet Cooper's criteria precisely, as has already been noted, many do find it "short, light, and handy" and thus deserving of the descriptive term "scout rifle" on its own merits.

The term "scout rifle" has come to apply to a lot of variations that might not meet Cooper's criteria, strictly speaking. If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, perhaps "short, light, and handy" is also. I understand why you challenged the OP's remark. He cannot know what Cooper would have thought of the GSR, any more than you can. We can make some objective assessments, as you have done with weight, and point out where it falls short of Cooper's criteria. But that doesn't nullify calling the GSR a "scout rifle." If enough people think of it as a "scout rifle," that it what it is. I own three "scout" rifles, none of which would meet Cooper's criteria. Some would rather refer to these types of rifles as "Pseudo scouts." But that enshrines Cooper's definition as the only possible one. I do not buy that. Cooper deserves all the credit we can give him for popularizing the concept, and giving it concrete expression, but with language being what it is, no one can stop the term "scout rifle" from being used to refer to guns that do not meet his criteria perfectly. I'm not so sure that he would mind that, as long as he got the credit for the general idea. But again, who knows?

krupparms
March 13, 2013, 10:55 AM
Baz is right! I or anyone else will never know what Mr. Cooper would have said about the Ruger GSR. It was just my opinion. I agree with Baz though, I think it meets the criteria set forth by Cooper. To me it is short, light & handy! Some may feel otherwise! That's your choice but to most I believe it will be a scout rifle! Say what you want to, but I am happy with it & that's all that counts in the end! :)

HOOfan_1
March 13, 2013, 01:22 PM
The point is not whether or not the GSR meets MY definition of a Scout rifle or YOUR definition, but Jeff Cooper's definition. This is well documented and the GSR simply does not meet it. Period.


Has Jeff Cooper come back from the grave and commented on it?

Sheepdog1968
March 13, 2013, 06:36 PM
I emailed MPI stocks specifically about making a polymer stock for the Ruger GS scout. They can make one in about 3 months for $800 that would likely shave a pound or more off the weight. Of course that price starts to get you to the Styer scout.

natman
March 14, 2013, 12:52 PM
Has Jeff Cooper come back from the grave and commented on it?
Obviously not. However, his opinions on the subject are well documented and one can reasonably extrapolate what his reaction would have been.

Either the weight is within the limit or it's not. It's not, and it could easily have been with a more judicious choice of stock materials. A word on the weight limit is in order. The original limit was 3 kilos (6.7 lbs). This was later expanded to 3.5 kilos (7.7 lbs) to accommodate long action “pseudo-scouts”, larger caliber versions with heavier barrels and the Steyr Scout, which was somewhat over the original limit due to the inclusion of a bipod, extra magazine holder and second magazine. The Ruger has none of these features.

I think it's fair to say that Jeff Cooper was a big fan of function over form and - IMHO - sacrificing handiness for the sole purpose of making the rifle look like an M14 probably would not have gone over well.

In other words, if Jeff Cooper had designed a Scout Rifle with access to Ruger's resources, I don't think it would have had a stock made of the heaviest material commonly used for stock building and I don't think it would have had its current magazine design. One need look no further than the magazine on the Steyr Scout, a rifle he DID have a hand in designing, to confirm that.

Here's a few of Cooper's actual quotes on the subject:

The Remington 600 carbine was the immediate ancestor of the modern Scout, and it was the weapon upon which the weight criterion was established at 3 kilograms (6.7 lbs, sights and all)

….. one cannot build an approximation of a Scout and expect results. The job should be done right or not at all.

The Scout project has "charged off madly in all directions." I guess I should not be surprised. Nobody owns the word "Scout," and anyone is free to call anything whatever he wants except on American university campuses, of course. Nonetheless, I should point out a couple of rather important criteria:
1. The Scout really should make weight, and weight is 3kg (6.7lbs) including sights…..

But even with the Springfield action, a "pseudo−scout" in 30−06 should be held to 7.5lbs, including telescope.

On the matter of Scouts, we are mildly annoyed to discover that the term has been picked up and run off with by all sorts of people who have never seen a true Scout and do not know what it is. Most of these people do not realize that a Scout must make weight

I have tried to write the matter up on several occasions, but I am amazed at the number of people who adopt a term without reading into it.

These are all from Volumes 1-3 in Cooper's Commentaries (http://myweb.cebridge.net/mkeithr/Jeff/). There are plenty more.

john wall
March 14, 2013, 01:28 PM
As an old head who actually has a Ruger GSR and shoots it, I can say it fills the bill of short, light and handy. I sold five guns this model simply outclassed and replaced.

BTW, this gun IS a controlled feed '98 type. I will only own a '98 type if a turnbolt gun. Feeding is silky smooth with a variety of bullet designs. Get a few extra mags.

If the gun is too heavy for you, quit stuffing your piehole with cheeseburgers and cake, and go to the gym. You also need to carry water, food, bedding, and extra ammo if in the field or in a "situation". If this is too heavy for you, take steps to fix that.

The first time I took mine to the range, I fired about 100 rds through it. I was amazed at the mild recoil of this arm with full throttle loads. The second time, 80+ rds. When I take it to the range, I fire every round I have. The only negative about the gun is the ease with which large quantities of ammo are consumed.

I reluctantly installed a Loopie Scout scope, simply because the irons on the gun made 200 yd steel silhouette hits a sure thing.

A 6-something pound rifle would be great to carry, but in 308 it would be miserable to shoot. I would like to see this arm in 260 Remington.

I like the gun the way it is. You can always drop a couple of grand on a set up Steyr, while realizing they sold high performance battle arms to our enemies that have been used against us.

My REAL 1898 Mauser is an FN-equipped 1948 Husqvarna Sporter in 8X57S. This gun weighs in at less than 7 pounds and will give you a butt-kicking when you shoot it.

Jeff was a good guy with good ideas, but his ideas were from another time. I don't drink Jeff's Kool Aid. He thought Glocks sucked. Thought the Bren Ten was the Holy Grail. Missed the mark on those.

Andrew Wyatt
March 14, 2013, 01:35 PM
I think it's fair to say that Jeff Cooper was a big fan of function over form and - IMHO - sacrificing handiness for the sole purpose of making the rifle look like an M14 probably would not have gone over well.



You're misinformed. The rifle uses the magazines it does, because those magazines are as close to ubiquitous as a detachable bolt action rifle magazine gets, and they were designed for use on a bolt action rifle, by accuracy international for use on their R700 chassis.

natman
March 14, 2013, 02:39 PM
If the gun is too heavy for you, quit stuffing your piehole with cheeseburgers and cake, and go to the gym....[further personal attacks deleted]

It appears you don't understand the concept of "handiness" and why weight you carry in your hand is a lot more important than weight you carry in your pack.

A 6-something pound rifle would be great to carry, but in 308 it would be miserable to shoot.

I own a 6.2 lb 308 and have no problem with the recoil. Perhaps you should go to the gym....:)

Jeff was a good guy with good ideas, but his ideas were from another time. I don't drink Jeff's Kool Aid. He thought Glocks sucked. Thought the Bren Ten was the Holy Grail. Missed the mark on those.

Your perfectly free to disagree with what Jeff Cooper said. I only take exception to those who misstate what he said.

natman
March 14, 2013, 03:05 PM
I think it's fair to say that Jeff Cooper was a big fan of function over form and - IMHO - sacrificing handiness for the sole purpose of making the rifle look like an M14 probably would not have gone over well.

You're misinformed. The rifle uses the magazines it does, because those magazines are as close to ubiquitous as a detachable bolt action rifle magazine gets, and they were designed for use on a bolt action rifle, by accuracy international for use on their R700 chassis.

I'm pretty sure the GSR resembles an M14 and I don't think it's a coincidence:

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e166/nat_mann/GSRvM14_zps05bf56e8.jpg

chicharrones
March 14, 2013, 06:13 PM
C'mon now. Ruger already has a replica of the M14, which we all know is a Mini. ;)

What is unspoken, is that the Ruger GSR is really the lovechild of the Jungle Carbine and a short barreled sniper rifle, like a Steyr. The original issue mags that come with the Ruger GSR just got too much Viagra, that's all.

Andrew Wyatt
March 14, 2013, 06:31 PM
so, you're saying the ruger design team sourced non proprietary AICS magazines, not because they actually work, but because they make the rifle look more like an m-14.

Averageman
March 14, 2013, 06:31 PM
You're misinformed. The rifle uses the magazines it does, because those magazines are as close to ubiquitous as a detachable bolt action rifle magazine gets, and they were designed for use on a bolt action rifle, by accuracy international for use on their R700 chassis.

So some of you would consider these magazines as "Off the Shelf " and not proprietary?
Can you buy them now from either Accuracy International or Ruger?
The point I am making here as they made a choice and from the stuff I have seen your magazines are going to cost you in the $80.00 and up neighborhood.
I'm just saying that Ruger has went a very long way to find a magazine that works in a rifle they designed.
Now did they design the rifle around the magazine or the magzine around the rifle?

Andrew Wyatt
March 14, 2013, 06:39 PM
the magazine was designed to run in bolt action rifles that weren't designed from the beginning to have detachable magazines, like the remington 700 and the ruger m77.

the GSR action is fundamentally unchanged from its parent rifle, the ruger m77.

ruger had no design input on the magazine, AI just did a good job designing the magazine to work.

nipprdog
March 14, 2013, 08:45 PM
They do make it in .223. I actually held one

Not.

Art Eatman
March 14, 2013, 09:08 PM
I shot one. Good rifle. But I wouldn't call it a scout rifle except that's the label for it. :) I think it would make a good truck gun, particularly if a shorter mag was used. And, not bad at all for a basic hunting rifle.

Texan Scott
March 14, 2013, 09:30 PM
I want a Scout variant of the 77/44. I know it's not the Colonel's "vision", but it would make the sweetest little Hill Country deer and pig rifle!

How 'bout it Ruger?

BruceB
March 14, 2013, 09:30 PM
The main issue, it seems to me, is the question of "short, light, and handy."

"Short" and "light" are quantifiable in inches and pounds/ounces. With my GSR beside other rifles in one of my racks, it's almighty close to being as short as my M1 Carbine and Mini-14. For weight, it is certainly lighter than any of my 'conventional' sporters, and much lighter than any other 7.62 NATO "service rifle".

So, we are left with what is, or is not, "handy". This is a purely subjective, personal opinion....and for MY purposes I find the GSR to be very handy indeed. Due to vision difficulties, I mounted a Redfield/Leupold 3-9X sight on the receiver...and I STILL find it short, light...and handy.

So what if it "looks like an M-14"? It also looks like the pictured #5 Mk 1 Enfield...again, so what? The Enfield pre-dates the Ruger rifle by 60 years or so, and even then it was doing much the same jobs. I'm morally certain that I saved myself from an early death or serious injury with a Jungle Carbine, and I have a very high regard for the type. A GSR in my hands would have done just as well.

Let me throw out another cliche' here....could the GSR be the semi-mythical 'Truck Rifle' that's so often discussed? The #5 Enfield served me well in that role in bear/moose country, and the detachable magazine on the GSR goes a long way toward qualifying the "short, light, handy" GSR for truck service. I've even used a full-length M-14 in the truck, and didn't find it cumbersome. It was a great comfort in a certain potentially-deadly confrontation, and I had no difficulty 'unlimbering' the beast when it was needed.

Just don't lose track of the detached magazine in the vehicle! Game laws generally forbid loaded rifles in vehicles, so the detachable mags are a rather important feature.

baz
March 14, 2013, 11:24 PM
The point I am making here as they made a choice and from the stuff I have seen your magazines are going to cost you in the $80.00 and up neighborhood.Cut that in half, and say $40 and up. I recently bought four from Ruger for $39.95 each, and two from Alpha Industries for $62 each. So you are definitely overreaching in your attempt to paint the mags as costly. Of course, those prices look high compared to prices for AR or AK mags, but the volume of the latter makes it possible for them to be sold at lower costs. And, given that this is a bolt action, not a semi-auto, folks are not going to feel the need to have as many per rifle. I've got all I need now, and that's half the number I would typically want with a semi-auto. In the end, I'd likely spend as much for mags for a semi-auto as I've spent on mags for the Ruger.

HOOfan_1
March 14, 2013, 11:53 PM
So, we are left with what is, or is not, "handy". This is a purely subjective, personal opinion.....

Bingo....I have yet to find a quantifiable scientific scale which measures "handiness". So saying the GSR isn't "handy" is like arguing about whether Kate Upton is hot or not.

breakingcontact
March 14, 2013, 11:54 PM
This seems to be such a polarizing rifle. I like the idea of it, like how it felt, but haven't shot one or humped one around the woods all day.

chicharrones
March 15, 2013, 12:03 AM
This seems to be such a polarizing rifle.

It's been that way since the first photos and specs had been released a couple years ago. All because of two small words marked on the receiver and stock, plus the marketing behind it.

Too bad really, because I think the Ruger GSR is an awesome bolt gun.

Mossberg must feel like getting on that small money train too, since they have detachable mag bolt guns out now. If the MVP Patrol had the stock of the MVP Predator, it sure would look dang near identical to the Ruger GSR.

natman
March 15, 2013, 03:29 AM
I shot one. Good rifle. But I wouldn't call it a scout rifle except that's the label for it. :) I think it would make a good truck gun, particularly if a shorter mag was used. And, not bad at all for a basic hunting rifle.

Exactly. I'm glad somebody gets it. It's not a bad rifle, it's just not Jeff Cooper's idea of a Scout rifle. The only problem really is that it was misnamed.

I agree that it would make an excellent truck rifle. The weight would be a recoil reducing bonus instead of a burden in that application, the detachable mag is a big plus and the rugged stock and iron sights would be perfect.

Just a question of horses for courses.

colnago58
March 15, 2013, 09:24 AM
Cooper wasn't all that thrilled with the Ruger Frontier, I doubt he would like the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle

Look at the barrel and stock of a Ruger, and look at the barrel and stock of a Steyr Scout, there is the difference in weight and cost.

For those who own and like the Ruger, more power to you, but I will keep my Steyr.

chicharrones
March 15, 2013, 09:35 AM
Look at the barrel and stock of a Ruger, and look at the barrel and stock of a Steyr Scout, there is the difference in weight and cost.

You got that right. While the Ruger is at the top of my price range, the Steyr is downright unobtanium for my willingness to part with my money.

TexAg
March 15, 2013, 09:40 AM
I'm curious how the barrel heating up effects accuracy on the Steyr versus the Ruger.

MK11
March 15, 2013, 10:06 AM
Why would anyone care if it meets the official parameters of an outdated concept?

Need a relatively light, handy, powerful bolt for hunting or politically acceptable self-defense? Get it. I'm thinking hard about getting one for just this.

Not light enough, accurate enough or handy enough for your intended purpose? Don't get it.

Col. Cooper was an obvious giant in the field but his lasting contributions are his work on the software, not the hardware.

chicharrones
March 15, 2013, 10:21 AM
http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e166/nat_mann/GSRvM14_zps05bf56e8.jpg

Since it was brought up, proper scale between the two is something to be considered. ;)

krupparms
March 15, 2013, 12:43 PM
If the styer was more affordable I would have tried one! Also I have not seen any for sale! Say what you want, bicker over the small stuff! It is still a scout rifle! No matter what J. Cooper would have said! It's my rifle &I choose to call it a scout rifle ! If you do not agree! Sorry, send me a styer &I will be glad to shoot &compare them &get back to you! P.S. Don't forget the .308 ammo! It's getting hard to find! ;) After looking at the Mossberg MVP, I'd rather try it out!

Art Eatman
March 15, 2013, 12:55 PM
Not many folks today think in terms of "scouting" as it was done in the past.

Odds are that here in the U.S., the closest thing to it would be a person quietly searching for marijuana patches on public lands in the west. You want to avoid any actual firefight, since that would mean failure of the mission. The deal is to locate and report back so that the Bad Guys could be captured. In the event of a sudden encounter, however, very-rapid target acquisition would be a must, a necessity.

Or it could be a deer hunter who accidentally discovers such a problem. The scout rifle works well for big-game hunting as well as defense in that situation.

Play with your own scenario for the utility.

Regardless, "light and handy" never hurt much of anything. I like my seven-pound Sako carbine in .243, and I like my 6.25-pound 700 Ti in 7mm08. Scopes, ammo, slings included.

Thinking about all this, I guess that because I'm a hunter with bunches of one-shot kills through the years, anything beyond four or five rounds is surplus. :D

krupparms
March 16, 2013, 01:48 AM
Hopefully my days of getting shot at are over! One never knows! As one of the post mentioned magazines are getting expensive &hard to find. I will get a few of the 5rd.mag. s for hunting &a few 10rd.mag. s for backup in case of problems in the woods! This will probably be a hunter as that was the reason I bought it. ;)

Rexster
March 16, 2013, 03:33 PM
I finally had a chance to handle a GSR. It seemed relatively handy, to me; not quite Browning BLR-handy, but handy enough. I did not not buy, as it was the original right-hand model, whereas I am left-eye dominant, and my right shoulder's rotator cuff is scrambled, so anything over .223 is best fired from my left shoulder. I reckon left-hand GSRs will be special-order.

BruceB
March 16, 2013, 03:46 PM
Rexter, amigo;

My left-hand GSR was off-the-rack at a local (small-town) hardware store.

Also, on one visit to the Scheels store in Reno, I saw no less than FIVE left-handers on their racks.

It's pretty obvious that Ruger is getting them out, and as lefties, our chances of finding GSRs in stock may be better than those odd-ball right-handers have....

It's a very nice rifle, too.... smooth, accurate, great trigger just as-issued.

chicharrones
March 16, 2013, 04:37 PM
I reckon left-hand GSRs will be special-order.

Or get one shipped to your local FFL gun seller. Four are currently here.
http://www.gunbroker.com/All/BI.aspx?Keywords=left+hand+ruger+gunsite+scout

ATCDoktor
March 16, 2013, 07:15 PM
I reckon left-hand GSRs will be special-order.

Sprague's Sports in Yuma Arizona had a Left Handed GSR in stock (at least they did 4 days ago).

They can be found (in left handed configuration).

krupparms
March 17, 2013, 09:55 AM
The only model that the LGS has had was a Lefty! I got my R.H.model at B-mart. Like I stated, one a week! You almost must be there when they put it out! Mine was only on the rack for about 2hr.s & I grabbed it as fast as possible! There were 2 people who left sports depth.after they saw I had bought it, both were mumbeling something softly! I doubt it was aything good about me! :rolleyes: I showed it to my 2 grandsons yesterday & both said the same thing! Grandpa when can we shoot it? They just started shooting with BB guns & .22lr.s so it will be awhile. But soon They will get their chance! Love that adjustable stock it only takes a few minutes to change LOP. for them or me! Handy! :)

rodregier
March 18, 2013, 09:15 PM
Some of the Ruger-marked metal 10 round magazines are very similar to the AICS 10 round metal magazines, but they are not the same.

I would speculate that early Ruger-sold magazines were AICS units until they tooled up to make their own (or domestically contracted them out). The two magazine products are close enough that it doesn't seem to be an issue.

musicman10_1
March 18, 2013, 11:01 PM
I made it to the range today and shot my GSR again. I really like this rifle and find it to be handy, accurate, and damn good looking to boot. I have a bunch of 168 grain match ammo and this rifle just seems to like it and I find the accuracy to be fantastic.

PhotoBiker
March 18, 2013, 11:55 PM
To the OP, did you get the new Stainless GSR with the 18" barrel?

Mine has been on order at the LGS for a while (basically the day I received the email from Ruger announcing it). I've not received any status that they've started shipping yet though.

krupparms
March 19, 2013, 08:11 PM
No! Unfortunately they only had the blue regular model! Or I would have gotten one in S.S.! But I will upgrade if I get the chance!

B!ngo
March 19, 2013, 11:59 PM
I find it rather challenging to channel the late Mr. Cooper so stating what he would say of the GSR is beyond my pay grade.
Having picked up and maneuvered (but not shot) a left-handed GSR and reading extensively on it, it would seem that Ruger has constructed the closest thing yet to a universal long gun.
Other than as a battle rifle, it scores on size, weight, length, caliber, optic options, capacity and an arms-length list of other parameters that all rate 'very high' individually and in the aggregate extremely high as a balanced, capable and broadly applicable long gun.
Had I not already ordered and brought home a Tikka Sporter Left-Hand .308 24" (it's not interchangeable and quite a bit pricier but I'm not about to add another .308 bolt gun just yet).
But I have not doubt that I'll end up with one of these before the end of the year. And it's been sufficiently successful that it doubtlessly will spur a creative aftermarket of parts and things in due time.
B

krupparms
March 20, 2013, 08:28 AM
As time go's by I believe more companies will make 'Scout Rifles '. It just makes sense for them to jump on that wagon. I think a lot of hunters will want something like it! I was useing a Issy 2A1/.308 B.A. rifle before I got the Ruger! They are good rifles but no where near a Ruger. The Mossberg & Styer show that these are popular choices for alot of fokes. I also agree that there will be a market for accessories that will be made for these rifles! :)

rodinal220
March 20, 2013, 09:59 AM
I love my GSR!!The scout rifle was a "concept" by Col. Cooper.This has been debated ad nauseum over the years.The Scout has always been in flux.The folks at Gunsite were asked to put their 2 cents into it for Ruger and I believe they came up with a good product.I personally only have one teeny gripe,it does not have a stripper clip guide built into the receiver.

The metal factory mags are not made by Accuracy International(AI) they are made by Accurate -Mag Products.

http://www.accurate-mag.com/

Ruger looked at using M-14 mags but could not get them to work with the GSR action.

I personally prefer Alpha-Industries 10 round GSR mags,they are muy bueno!!

http://www.alphaindmfg.com/

The poly factory mags have been spotty in reliability,so I'm avoiding those til Ruger sorts things out.

Put a proper Scout optik on it and one of Andys Leathers "Ching-Slings"(DA KIT) and you are GTG.

http://andysleather.com/

krupparms
March 20, 2013, 12:38 PM
That was my only gripe also, No stripper guide! A must on this kind of rifle!

Andrew Wyatt
March 20, 2013, 01:07 PM
1. a stripper clip guide is worse than useless on a rifle with a single position feed magazine, like the GSR.

2. stripper clips are less reliable than detachable magazines.

BruceB
March 20, 2013, 02:27 PM
Andrew is correct.

Not only that, but rifles normally used with detachable mags don't always accept strippers all that well even WITH an integral guide.

The Canadian-issue C1/C1A1 (FAL) has a stripper guide incorporated in the top cover. In actual testing with our NATO-standard stripper clips, we found that use of strippers to load a mag in the rifle was very awkward and mostly unsuccessful.

The rifle was issued with four magazines and a loading guide which slipped over a magazine and accepted the strippers. Combat-packed ammo was issued in weather-proof bandoliers, with two strippers of five rounds in each bandolier pocket. This worked very well, compared to the struggle involved in TRYING to load the mag from strippers while it was in the rifle.

The M14 mags that so many people say should have been Ruger's choice for the GSR are all over the map for quality. Some, without exaggeration, are pure junk. I don't blame them one bit for going with a different magazine....and I OWN an M1A.

chicharrones
March 20, 2013, 05:10 PM
I don't miss having a stripper clip guide on the GSR whatsoever. I have and had rifles with stripper clip guides and I have used stripper clips, but those guns need them (militarily) due to a fixed magazine. Or the gun was issued with only one detachable mag and the old military doctrine was to charge the mag with stripper clips instead of passing out tons of magazines.

I really don't see the need for stripper clips on modern manufactured rifles with detachable magazines.

chicharrones
March 20, 2013, 06:01 PM
Speaking of mags, my backorder from early February just got here. With the $20 discount from shopruger.com, the 3 mags were $33.28 each. Not including shipping, of course. :cool:

splithoof
March 21, 2013, 12:28 AM
The Alpha magazines are the best choice, followed by factory steel (Accurate Mag) in either five or ten rounds, and last by the plastic factory versions. I use them all, and was hopeful that the plastic would be better. I have had to return one so far, but the replacement seems to work.
The Galco Safari Ching Sling works great as well.

mastiffhound
March 30, 2013, 01:23 AM
The fact that Mossberg was able to go with SR-25 mags says something. Ruger could have done the same. But they like charging through the nose for mags. It is possible, although I've heard a Ruger rep explain that it wasn't. M14 mags are made all over the world, with different grades of great, good, bad, and terrible. I wouldn't use them either. The only magazine fed Ruger firearms that use widely available mags are their 1911 and SR-556, that I know of. That being said, I love my Rugers. I don't care much for Mossberg, except shotguns.

Being able to take a mag I can get for $20 or less over mags that cost $40 is big. Magpul will be releasing a 25 rounder soon too! Also Magpul's 10 rounder is very short when compared to Rugers. The best part? Availability, Magpul always has an endcap or section in all the shops I frequent. I really wanted a Gunsite Scout but the MVP is just a little better. Synthetic stock and SR-25 mags make all the difference!

MountainBear
March 30, 2013, 02:23 AM
On order to make their MVP rifle to feed from AR mags, they had to put a small hinged flap on the bottom of their bolt. From a gunsmith standpoint, it looks like an exceptionally flimsy system. I handled the rifle at SHOT show in January, and the flap did not feel like a quality device. It's held in place by a single small diameter roll pin.

Call the rifle what you will, having held both guns, taken them apart, shot them (the .223 MVP and the .308 GSR), and otherwise fondled them. I prefer the engineering on the Ruger. It just seems like a better built rifle.

I never met Col. Cooper. He had some (interesting?) ideas. Some better than others.

My opinion isn't based on what he would say, just what I have observed and done...

Ignition Override
March 30, 2013, 03:00 AM
Every photo of the rifle reminds me of my Enfield # 5 (ten-rd. mag.) "Jungle Carbines" and the Spanish FR8 Mausers in the next room.

Other than having a scope mount or being in .308 (also safe for the $425, large-ring FR8), is the $1039 GSR a new rifle concept?
Maybe it is, but the prices seems to be double what is necessary If one doesn't need to have it scoped.
Many feral pigs are shot from less than fifty yards.

chicharrones
March 30, 2013, 10:22 AM
The Alpha magazines are the best choice, followed by factory steel (Accurate Mag) in either five or ten rounds, and last by the plastic factory versions. I use them all, and was hopeful that the plastic would be better. I have had to return one so far, but the replacement seems to work.


If I'd have known of the Alphas before I placed my Ruger order, I pretty dang sure I would have preferred the metal Alphas, too. :)

chicharrones
March 30, 2013, 10:26 AM
Other than having a scope mount or being in .308 (also safe for the $425, large-ring FR8), is the $1039 GSR a new rifle concept?

I don't think the GSR is a new concept at all. All the features on the GSR have been in other designs in one way or another for decades. Except for the forward picatinny rail, that's sort of a recent development.

Yet, people still buy new rifles regardless of the type or availability of pre-owned rifles out there.

mastiffhound
March 30, 2013, 09:12 PM
On the Mossberg MVP .308 they didn't have to make any changes to their bolt from the looks of it. The .223/5.56 version has that extra flimsy piece but the .308 version doesn't. It was the reason I held back on the .223/5.56.

chicharrones
March 31, 2013, 11:26 AM
On the Mossberg MVP .308 they didn't have to make any changes to their bolt from the looks of it. The .223/5.56 version has that extra flimsy piece but the .308 version doesn't. It was the reason I held back on the .223/5.56.

Do you have any links of that .308 MVP? I'm curious to see it. :)

mastiffhound
April 2, 2013, 07:27 PM
This is the review I read, only one I could find. Rifleshooter is a Guns & Ammo magazine company. The review is sucky but pics and info are there somewhat. Look up gallery of guns, they are listed for mossberg just not for sale yet too. On the GOG website it is listed as taking sr25 type mags. The review has it as M14/sr25 style mags which is wrong. How do you get a job working for a magazine? I know I could do a better job than this guy.

Rifleshooter review:http://www.rifleshootermag.com/2013/01/29/everyman-rifle-mossberg-mvp-in-7-62-review/

Gallery of Guns pics and prices:http://www.galleryofguns.com/genie/Default.aspx?pg=list&index=0&mfg=Mossberg&mdl=MVP&cat=2&type=Rifle&cal=308&fin=&sit=&pid=&inv=

The one thing I didn't like was the adjustable stock pistol grip version, it just looks stupid. The patrol is just fine with me. The flex can have the stock changed out for the normal style which is what I would do if you want an 18.5
inch barrel.

goon
April 2, 2013, 11:57 PM
One thing I don't like about mine is that the issue mags rattle worse than they do on an AK.
They're not even a rock 'n lock type magazine and they don't lock in the front and rear both.
I'm tempted to try a different magazine to test the fit before I write mine off. It is a well-made and soft shooting rifle. But I may end up with something customized from a M77 in 30 '06 or .308 for my uses.
Hard to say at this point. I'd have no qualms about recommending one to someone - it has been 100%. It just may not be the best rifle for me.

BruceB
April 3, 2013, 02:26 AM
When you refer to "issue mags", are they the steel or polymer type?

I'm asking because , on my left-hand Scout, the ten-round steel magazine that came with the rifle is a pretty decent fit. It's not unduly loose or "rattly", and it feeds well.

I also bought several 3- and 5-shot polymer magazines, and they are simply excellent. VERY secure, smooth-feeding, and generally of high quality. I particularly like the easier carrying of the rifle, especially with the almost-flush-fitting 3-rounders.

It's funny.... one really doesn't "need" a lot of mags for a bolt-action rifle, but I have the dangest urge to buy more of those polymer jobs.

goon
April 3, 2013, 03:42 AM
Bruce - mine came with the steel AI ten round mag. I bought one extra for it. Both feed fine, but they wobble.

chicharrones
April 3, 2013, 08:04 AM
This is the review I read, only one I could find. Rifleshooter is a Guns & Ammo magazine company. The review is sucky but pics and info are there somewhat. Look up gallery of guns, they are listed for mossberg just not for sale yet too. On the GOG website it is listed as taking sr25 type mags. The review has it as M14/sr25 style mags which is wrong. How do you get a job working for a magazine? I know I could do a better job than this guy.

Rifleshooter review:http://www.rifleshootermag.com/2013/01/29/everyman-rifle-mossberg-mvp-in-7-62-review/

Gallery of Guns pics and prices:http://www.galleryofguns.com/genie/Default.aspx?pg=list&index=0&mfg=Mossberg&mdl=MVP&cat=2&type=Rifle&cal=308&fin=&sit=&pid=&inv=

The one thing I didn't like was the adjustable stock pistol grip version, it just looks stupid. The patrol is just fine with me. The flex can have the stock changed out for the normal style which is what I would do if you want an 18.5
inch barrel.

Cool. Thanks! :cool:

splithoof
April 4, 2013, 02:26 AM
The stock steel Ruger magazines are produced by Accurate Mag, and are NOT AI. While my plastic stock Ruger mags did function in one AI rifle I tried them in, a stock AI magazine at the time DID NOT function in my GSR. At the time I purchased Alpha magazines, there was a necessary distinction between Ruger and IA model numbers, as noted in their order process at the time.

goon
April 4, 2013, 02:36 AM
Well... They still rattle.

splithoof
April 5, 2013, 01:33 AM
That's curious; I have never seen any rattle, and that is with six examples of the rifle, and the dozens of mags that were with them.

RoughHouse
April 6, 2013, 05:47 PM
Hi there...I have seen in several places that the Ruger Scout mags are made by Accuracy International. Is it possible to purchase compatible mags from Accuracy?

RoughHouse
April 6, 2013, 05:54 PM
Hi there...I have seen in several places that the Ruger Scout mags are made by Accuracy International. Is it possible to purchase compatible mags from Accuracy?

splithoof
April 6, 2013, 07:56 PM
They are NOT made by AI; they are produced for Ruger by Accurate Mag.
Plastic mags I believe are produced by Ruger.

usurp31
April 6, 2013, 07:59 PM
What scope set up are you guys going with on your Scout?

splithoof
April 6, 2013, 08:08 PM
I use a Leupold 1.5-5 VXR Scout w/duplex fire-dot reticle. It has a 30mm main tube, and I use the Leupold quick detachable rings.

chicharrones
April 6, 2013, 09:10 PM
What scope set up are you guys going with on your Scout?

For now, I am using a 4 year old Simmons ProHunter 4x32 pistol scope. It was mounted on another rifle in a scout type mount, but the eye relief on that rifle's mount didn't work like I wanted. The eye relief works very well on my Ruger GSR. When you shoulder the rifle, the reticle just pops right in front of you.

Now, if I hadn't already owned the Simmons I'd look into a true Scout scope with shorter eye relief than a pistol scope. I could move the scope back a couple inches if I had a Scout scope.

The rings on it are Burris Zee rings (medium height).

BruceB
April 7, 2013, 04:16 AM
I INTENSELY dislike the forward-mounted "Scout"-type scope. That Picatinny rail was removed about forty seconds after I opened the box.

After fifty years of using receiver-mounted scopes, I find they are lightning-fast at lower magnifications, and are LESS restrictive on my field-of-view. Try any decent sight with a lower-end of 1.5X or thereabouts, and WITH PRACTICE, it's like looking out your picture window.

Also, the forward-mounted sight badly affects the balance and handling of the rifle.... and it's painfully ugly, as well.

On my GSR, because of advancing age and diminishing visual abilities, I went to a new Redfield/Leupold3-9X mounted in the Ruger rings on the receiver. Ten years ago, with better eyesight, it probably would have been a 1.5-4.5X of some decent make.

The new Redfield works well, and at 3X it is quite capable at close range.

baz
April 7, 2013, 09:40 PM
What scope set up are you guys going with on your Scout?Leatherwood Hi-Lux ATR Long Eye Relief Scout Rifle Scope 2-7x 32mm 2-Plex Reticle Matte (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/761874/leatherwood-hi-lux-atr-long-eye-relief-scout-rifle-scope-2-7x-32mm-2-plex-reticle-matte)

I first had the Leupold 2.5x on it, but my ailing eyes need the higher power of the 2-7x.

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