Pregnant wild pigs. How long between littering and feeding again?


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KMatch
March 12, 2013, 10:14 AM
I have a couple of very pregnant wild pigs on the gamecam. Both disappeared at the same time along with their sounders. Who knows how long they stay away from their normal feeding routine before the newborns are able to travel? Are we talking a day or 2, week or 2, or a month or longer? Or do they simply drop them and take off to feed as normal? They were coming in around 3-4 am telling me they were travelers and not living close by so they just might go away altogether, but I'm just wondering what you know that I don't (yet).

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chas08
March 12, 2013, 10:57 AM
I'm not sure of the number of days, but it cant be long! I've seen sows with litters in tow that weren't much bigger than large rats! If they have disappeared off your camera it's more likely that they have just moved on! Hogs around here are very nomadic. They follow the food of choice and around here, corn feeders are a dime a dozen, they're everywhere!

pikid89
March 12, 2013, 11:06 AM
from my experience, wild hogs are similar enough to domestic pigs so,

after farrowing, most piglets nurse for 4 weeks before weaning. Obviously in a wild setting, growth rates and nursing times will vary, but based on how fast piglets grow, they are mobile in just a few days, and thats in a swine production setting. Wild animals have to be able to move to survive. As to the sow, it can get pregnant again in just a few weeks after farrowing, so i dont imagine that cycle will really interrupt their overall behavior and travel patterns much at all

303tom
March 12, 2013, 11:07 AM
Piglets are able to be up & going in just a few hours, take it from someone who lived on a farm & knows................
Quote; Normal piglets will be born quickly, get on their feet within a minute or two and be suckling in about 15 minutes.

KMatch
March 12, 2013, 11:18 AM
So... Ya'll are saying they're like the low-life mommas at wally world... "If you can't keep up, I'm just leaving you here!" I suppose if I haven't seen the 2 in a week or so, it isn't because of their deep mothering nature, they've likely moved on. Thanks for the info!

der Teufel
March 12, 2013, 11:39 AM
Look for them to reappear in 10-12 days.

adelbridge
March 12, 2013, 05:04 PM
they stay nested for a week or so to prevent getting picked off by predators and their baby daddies

Texan Scott
March 12, 2013, 05:12 PM
Shoot them before they whelp if possible. This is not a sportsmanship issue.. it's population control.

Flintknapper
March 12, 2013, 08:42 PM
Look for them to reappear in 10-12 days.


^^^^^^^^^^

There's your answer.

10 days to two weeks has been my experience.

They 'lay low' right at first and the Sow does not travel long distances from them during this time.

Afterward they will be following 'MaMa' just fine, able to go just about anywhere she wants to go. They will nurse for as long as she will tolerate it...but are usually weaned by 3 months of age.

Patocazador
March 12, 2013, 10:40 PM
My dog and I jumped two hogs and they ran off but one delayed her exit about 40 seconds. It turned out that she was starting to whelp and my dog came back with a squeaking little minute-old pig in her mouth. I got it on video but will not post it so the antis don't have more ammunition to use against us.
My dog also ran off a sow and most of her litter but retrieved an 11 lb pig as it was nipping her in the neck the whole time.

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll33/docjawbraker/IMG_0446a1web.jpg

PS: my dog is a 32 lb. Boykin spaniel.

alsaqr
March 14, 2013, 07:57 AM
they stay nested for a week or so to prevent getting picked off by predators and their baby daddies

Very small pigs are often left in the care of other sows while baby momma runs with the sounder. i once watched two wild sows care for over thirty small pigs while their mothers were off foraging with the sounder. Any lactating sow will nurse any pig in the sounder.

desidog
March 14, 2013, 12:34 PM
Mmmmm.... braised suckling pig.

I'd give them a good six hours low and slow before coming back from the smoker!

nathan
March 14, 2013, 03:43 PM
The reason why the Spanish conquistadores brought a lot of pigs to survive far from their colonies. Pigs propagate fast and provide the white meat they love so much.
Arab nomads have their sheeps and camels to provide them with protein . Same with the Mongolian nomads who have sheeps, goats and horses.

ridgerunner1965
March 14, 2013, 07:16 PM
a pig retriever! what could be better?

G'dale Mike
March 14, 2013, 09:54 PM
My experience has been the sows will disappear for about a month, then show back up on the cameras. I think, like mentioned, they usually bed up for 10-14 days, then takes a while for them to get back to the corn. Also, in my situation, i have a decent size creek, and if they are on the other side, i believe they stay until piglets are old enough to ford the creek.

Flintknapper
March 14, 2013, 10:12 PM
They get up this size pretty darn quick around here.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/hogs03-05-13b_zps5ae06f56.jpg

At that point they are ‘home free’, no large predators (save man) to reduce their numbers appreciably.

chas08
March 16, 2013, 10:54 AM
Great Pic, Flintknapper
Makes me hungry for pig half on the BBQ Pit!

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