Divorce and guns


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Tony50ae
March 12, 2013, 08:09 PM
Well here shortly will be filing for divorce. The soon to be ex moved out awhile ago. Caught her cheating and she basically wanted out. So Christmas kinda sucked. Now the guns are all mine and she is being fair overall with me keeping the house and stuff. At least that's a plus. Now this post has to do with a particular gun that was a Christmas present a couple years ago from her. She hid it from me until Christmas morning as we opened the other presents Christmas eve. It was a nice surprise! It was a brand new mini 14 that I wanted.

Time passed and we were busy, including buying a house this past year. So I never did get to shoot it. After all the drama happened I kinda lost interest in my guns for obvious reasons. Well a few months ago I got to shoot it at a friends house. Man it shot great with no hiccups and accuracy was good. I even used my 20 round magazines I bought to test them out. Perfect. So what's the problem? Well obviously the gun is tied to a happier time and to my wife. When I pull it out the safe it reminds me of that Christmas morning.
I wouldn't get rid of the rifle because of that, but wonder if anyone else here has had similar instances.

Also have a cowboy holster for my Ruger New Vaquero that she bought me for Valentine's day three years ago. I love it but same problem. I'm sure after a time it won't bring up those memories. Anyone else have any stories?


UPDATE! After all the replies I got, I have decided to keep the rifle. I really like it and even though right now the memory is painful, it was a gift given to me in a happier time. Thanks everyone for the replies, advice, and sympathy!

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mljdeckard
March 12, 2013, 08:20 PM
Elton John was what I loved to listen to with my ex. I still love Elton John.

EmbarkChief
March 12, 2013, 08:23 PM
I hear you, I went through the Big "D" about 5 years ago. Kept all my firearms but one. A mint condition P7 PSP with brand new tritium sights. I had given it to her as a birthday present and figured she should keep it as she was about to be a single gal once again. I sure wish I had that pistol now, can't bring myself to pay what they are bringing these days to replace it. I did leave a standing offer to buy it back from her if she ever wanted to get rid of it.

coyote315
March 12, 2013, 08:23 PM
I know this barely compares, and I'll preface it with condolences for the end of your marriage. So, I hope this helps and i only offer it because you asked:
I went (back) to Iraq (again... these wars take FOREVER) and my well-intentioned young wife let my dog's heart worm medicine lapse for a couple months, not realizing the importance. Fast forward 6 months and I am home safe but, have to put my beloved pet down. Used my favorite carry .22magnum.
Bad idea.
Had to sell the pistol. After that it was forever linked to Stitch, and that sad event. Used the money to try out something new, a cathartic way to turn the old into a new start.

On a related note, I had an awesome rifle hand-built for me by a famous maker to specific (military replica) specs of my duty weapon. Found that after so many tours, it now took all the fun out of deer hunting to use it, clean it, hear it, etc... so, i "sold" it to a close friend who is basically holding it for me in case, as old men, I can enjoy it again and sell it back to me. Until then, he hunts with it and I enjoy my non-military 7400.

Either of those might inspire an option for you.

fanchisimo
March 12, 2013, 08:24 PM
While no firearms apply to this, I have a few little things gifted to me from ex's that while not pleasant to look at/use for a while, it eventually passes and you remember it as a happy time, not the unpleasantness that followed. If you start a new relationship, don't tell the new girl that the item was a gift from the old girl.

Ms_Dragon
March 12, 2013, 08:36 PM
I had a .243 at I still get weepy over losing during the "D".

I can only hope it's now in the hands of someone who loved and cherished it as much as I did.

Rembrandt
March 12, 2013, 08:42 PM
Best to place no emotional attachment on firearms.....rather think like "Spock", only in a pure logic and practical manner.

psyopspec
March 12, 2013, 08:43 PM
I went (back) to Iraq (again... these wars take FOREVER)

Always nice to see a fellow veteran of Operation Enduring Operation.

OP, sorry to hear about what you're going through. The decision to keep or get rid of a memento from a relationship is a personal thing that only you can really address. I still own a few reminders of some very tough and heartbreaking times in my life, but the solution for me was to tuck those things away in storage. It's still recent enough that I don't want the reminders laying about, but at the same time I'm not distracted by keeping that stuff. Plus, years from now it's likely to bother me less.

ETA relevant food for thought: I've gone the other way with it too. I like to think of myself as a rational person (who doesn't?). But still sometimes changing one thing for another can help in cases like this. In a tough breakup, I'd saved up the money for an engagement ring from a deployment. Relationship ended, and I had the cash tucked away. My first instinct was to do the totally responsible thing and put into savings. Then the newly single guy in me kicked in, and I took a chunk of it and bought a nice watch. I decided that since I wasn't using the money to buy her jewelry symbolizing love, I'd take care of me and use it to buy my dejected self a reminder that I was a somewhat successful guy with good taste. No regrets. So if you go that route, maybe consider a similar conversion.

Aiko492
March 12, 2013, 08:44 PM
i'm sorry, its a tough time. i am in the middle of one myself. Your heart tells you one thing but i think logic (at least mine) says if it is an emotional hangup-trade it for even another rifle (even the same one lol). A clean break from "stuff" is important, memories are forever but try to keep only the good ones, eject the painful ones.

Gunnerboy
March 12, 2013, 08:47 PM
I just experianced the same sort of thing, i bought alot of guns while being with the significant other and yeah... sold almost my whole gun collection due to memories.

Teachu2
March 12, 2013, 08:50 PM
My ex wanted the horse I had bought, and I wanted the .38 Airweight - and neither of us got what we wanted. When the dust settled, I had to board the horse (and sold it) and she lost the gun in a burglary. Like she needed it for protection - her personality was enough!!!

oldbear
March 12, 2013, 08:51 PM
Tony, I've been through more than my share of divorces, so I think I understand how you are feeling. It's amazing what will trigger an emotion, both good or not so god.

Don't do anything rash, take your time and think everything through before you act. As for the presents your Ex has given you. Let me suggest that you put them aside for the time being then when you are ready take them out and enjoy them for what they are.

Best of luck.

Tony50ae
March 12, 2013, 08:53 PM
Thanks everyone. I had thought about selling the rifle to buy another gun. Especially now as I am sure I could get at the least what was paid for it. But I sure like that rifle! It is accurate and even when you heat up the barrel it still holds point of aim. That thicker barrel helps I am sure. I use to have an older mini that when that barrel got warm, point of arm would change nearly an inch at 50 yards.

We were suppose to go shoot it together but that never happened. But in the end I think I will keep it. We intend to at least remain acquaintances and on decent terms. So the rifle won't be tied to a nasty end to our marriage. And hey, it's not the rifle's fault!:D

Oh I agree these wars do seem to take forever! I deployed twice in the National Guard for Iraq/Kuwait.

larryh1108
March 12, 2013, 09:09 PM
As a man who has been there, the saying "time heals all wounds" is true. If you really like how it shot, put it away for a few years and when you start to remember the good times instead of the bad, bring it back out. If it didn't shoot exceptionally well or it didn't flip your switch then parting with it is no big deal. However, every now and then you get a gun that just feels right. Keep those. They are hard to find.

USAF_Vet
March 12, 2013, 09:13 PM
Another guy here who went through the "D". We were stationed in Turkey and she decided she wanted to go back home. And so she left, and took 90% (at least) of the household items with her. I never saw a single bit of it again. Stuff from my childhood on up tot he day she left, all of it never to be seen again. I imagine most of it wound up in a yard sale or goodwill or a garbage dump.

It sucks, but what few items I have left from our time together, I still have. Not because they remind me of her, but because they are practical and useful. If you can't separate her from the items, in this case your Mini 14 and a holster, get rid of them and get something to replace them.

The world keeps spinning.

Fremmer
March 12, 2013, 09:14 PM
Put it away for a year, and then take it out, it won't be so bad in a year.

Edited to add: and shoot it with a new hottie, you and that rifle will be just fine! ;)

Onward Allusion
March 12, 2013, 09:17 PM
Man, I feel for you. I went through something similar with the 1st wife, but I ended up selling pretty much my entire collection save for a few collectibles and a few FIE's which I couldn't unload unless it was at a police buy back. Let me tell you something, I regret it to this day. I know it's just one Mini 14 for you, but if you enjoy shooting it, it will bring you happier memories.

doc2rn
March 12, 2013, 09:29 PM
I like to think of it this way, the rifle will bring you far more good memories. Put it away for another day. I often have given Ex's a handgun from my collection, as they are becoming single again. Often times they call and just want to talk, some things remind you of people, and that can be a good thing. I parted with all of them on favorable terms, except one.

rondog
March 12, 2013, 09:36 PM
I wish I could have a "D"......not possible until the grandson we're raising is legal age and on his own.

WinThePennant
March 12, 2013, 09:55 PM
Hmmm... I guess I'm just built different. I never get dewey-eyed over anything related to physical possessions.

Akita1
March 12, 2013, 09:55 PM
I wish I could have a "D"......not possible until the grandson we're raising is legal age and on his own.
Now THAT's funny Rondog. Thanks for lightening the moment - even if it's true…

OP, sorry for your situation - been through it myself and even when people play nice it still sucks. Sometimes it's just necessary. So, tell your guns it's not their fault, that mommy and daddy still love them and give them a great big hug. Then bring them to the range and play. All will pass, and everything will be right with the world again…and you'll still be their daddy no matter what happens. Relationships fail, guns perform.

Or just trade them in and get new ones!

Sheepdog1968
March 12, 2013, 10:39 PM
In 2001 I needed, wanted a very nice lamp for my family room. It was $500. After nine months of restraint and to see if I really wanted it I bought it. Less than a week later I was laid off from a job. It suddenly felt like an expensive purchase when there was no income. I'm looking at this lamp right now and kind of chukel and actually see it as my liberty lamp as I left a bad job and life has been better since. Your memory over the rifle will change over time.

Ehtereon11B
March 12, 2013, 10:41 PM
My ex-fiance bought me a Ruger SR9c for my birthday when I got back from overseas. I bought the firearm from her for $250 because I knew what she did to her previous exes firearms. It involves super glue. It is now my wife's concealed carry. It is perfectly fine to enjoy a weapon given to you by a former significant other. It is better to remember all your range trips anyway.

NavyLCDR
March 12, 2013, 10:46 PM
I only wish I had such problems. My now ex-wife sold a collection of 13 guns (family assets) while we were separated and after she filed for divorce while I was deployed to Iraq to pay the retainer on her pit bull divorce lawyer. But the good news is that I only have 1 year left now on the $3,250/month alimony.

Grassman
March 12, 2013, 11:30 PM
Sell it, fast. That's all I can say.

avs11054
March 12, 2013, 11:35 PM
Never been through a divorce. My mom bought my dad the shotgun that he used for pheasant hunting. When they divorced, he kept it and continued to use it. He never told me if it brought back memories or anything like that.

witchhunter
March 12, 2013, 11:59 PM
Been there, had to buy all of my guns back! Several years later you will be glad to have it! You will survive, I know, it doesn't feel like it right now, but it will get better. Good luck.

788Ham
March 13, 2013, 01:23 AM
NavyLCDR, I know that feeling very well ! My ex sold 5 of my firearms after I was thrown out, one of them was a NIB Ruger .357, bought on payments, wasn't paid for yet.

I lost a lot in the marriage, beside monetary goods, I am the better for it now, not a drink in 29 years, have a few more firearms than I had then, better too, PLUS, the wife I have now made me forget her in 2 minutes ! Things do get better, keep the mini 14 and shoot the danged thing!

bobinoregon
March 13, 2013, 02:48 AM
One of my ex's got a couple of my guns, miss the guns way more than her.

General Geoff
March 13, 2013, 04:23 AM
Painful memories are just as important as happy ones. Without the bad, there is less appreciation for the good.

U.S.SFC_RET
March 13, 2013, 05:56 AM
When the writing was on the wall (marriage) I moved every last gun I had out of the house. She didn't get them.

Redlg155
March 13, 2013, 10:13 AM
Look at the bright side. It could have been a full portrait tattoo of her...:uhoh:

Just watch a couple episodes of "Tattoo Nightmares" and you will see what I mean.

737Driver
March 13, 2013, 10:42 AM
I went through the exact same, I kept all my guns and she kept her two pistols that I had given her as presents.

If the mini brings you happiness then keep it, if it makes you sad get rid of it, but shooting anything brings me happiness no mater where it came from.

I kept a lot of things that will remind me of the good times when I am ready to dig them out of boxes, and I also got rid of a lot of reminders. Box up every picture, and reminder from your daily life for now and add them back later if you want. If in five years you don't want them, then get rid of them. But for now don't make any rash decisions, the stuff doesn't have to go anywhere immediately.

akv3g4n
March 13, 2013, 11:30 AM
Still happily married but I did get my buddy's Maverick 88 12ga after he passed at a young age. I helped his wife sell the others but wanted to keep one around to remember him by. It's hardly a classic gun but it's fun to shoot and it does invoke memories of him.

MachIVshooter
March 13, 2013, 12:36 PM
Used my favorite carry .22magnum.
Bad idea.
Had to sell the pistol. After that it was forever linked to Stitch, and that sad event.

I have never understood this. The only emotion I assign to guns is sentimental value of gifts or heirlooms, and this applies to all such items, not just firearms.

In Sept, I put down my GSD with my Glock 20. I have never hurt like that over an animal before, I literally fell to my knees and cried after I broke the shot. Nonetheless, I do not associate the firearm with the loss. I pulled the trigger, and even though it hurt like hell, still better that he got to go quickly at his home by the hand of his friend and without seeing it coming.

It's not that firearms don't conjure memories for me; Quite the contrary. I have a strange ability to remember with incredible detail the events surrounding the purchase of each and every firearm I own, and also of notable uses of them. But it is a conscious decision to not associate bad memories with an object to the extent that I dislike them. I won't sell the gun I used to put a loved pet down, nor will I throw away the shovel I used to dig the hole or burn the boots and clothes I wore that day, etc.

md2lgyk
March 13, 2013, 01:05 PM
My first wife once gave me a snubby .38 for Valentine's Day. Hid it in a box of chocolates. I sold it years later, but not because of any memories (it was over 30 years ago and any memories of her are still bad); I just didn't want it any more and wanted to buy something else.

Newcatwalt
March 13, 2013, 01:20 PM
Keep the gun and the good memory. As you get older you'll probably have a shortage of both.

Sniper66
March 13, 2013, 02:04 PM
You will get over it when you get over her. My ex ran off with her boss and after a short time (very short) I realized she did me a huge favor. Good riddance. Of course I still got screwed on the divorce settlement, but since the sight of her made me ill, it was a bargain. The good news; here I am 23+ years later with a delightful wife and 16 guns at last count. Just ordered a Browning 1911 .22 A1 for said delightful woman. She wants to learn to shoot too. Now if I can just find ammo...........

chez323
March 13, 2013, 02:13 PM
Been there and done that, now working on a second divorce. In my first I lost just about everything I owned........ second one is a little more amicable but still costly. She's keeping her guitars and I'm keeping my guns. None of mine have anything to do with the soon to be ex so no issues there. If you like the gun, keep it. If it brings back to many memories than sell it off. The only thing I have that reminds me of my ex to be is that she's now living right next door to me with the guy she left me for. He's an unemployed, ex-con, recovering addict, father of 4 (kids in foster care/my ex hates kids)...... I on the other hand have met a nice women with 2 kids I adore and adore me, I couldn't be happier! Goodluck with the divorce and moving on, don't let it get you down.......

230RN
March 13, 2013, 02:38 PM
larryh1108

As a man who has been there, the saying "time heals all wounds" is true.

Non-gun-related:
Ditto here. Divorced in late 80s. Moped around for about two weeks. Finally decided I'd get over it sooner or later, so I might as well make it sooner.

Started dating right away, got over it sooner.

Rather than later.

Gun-related:
It's been a while, but I recall that in some pre-divorce orders, there are built-in "boiler plate" restraining orders. Watch out for them. Don't want to go looking it up, but I believe there was a brouhaha in Texas regarding a guy named Emerson who got nailed on those WRT firearms.

IIRC, it all got straightened out, but it was a real struggle for him in the meantime.

Like including jail time.

Terry

wojownik
March 13, 2013, 03:16 PM
Keep the Mini-14 for what it is ... a good tool. Yes, it's got an emotional meaning to you, so maybe someday make that rifle part your the process of moving on ... maybe do something like making it "new to you" by putting a new stock on the rifle or something.

Time heals wounds, yes, but sometimes there are little things you can do to help the process of moving forward.

walt501
March 13, 2013, 03:25 PM
The pain of the divorce will fade and eventually you'll be left with a good rifle that shoots well and be glad you kept it. Speaking from experience here.

WinThePennant
March 13, 2013, 06:21 PM
Can someone please tell me how the heck you lose your guns to your wife in a divorce? I can see how it can happen if she steals them, but I don't see how it can happen otherwise.

coloradokevin
March 13, 2013, 06:41 PM
Divorce is a tough thing, period. I've been there and done that.

A few tips:

1) Find a way to divide your assets without lawyers. If you can be amicable, and both get *some* of what you want without screwing the other, you'll come out of the whole process a lot better (and more financially sound). I did my divorce without lawyers about 4 years ago, and I'm still on speaking terms with my ex. I did have to give up a few things I wanted, and she had to give up a few things she wanted. But, we didn't really get hosed on either side.

2) Let the sentimental items remind you of the good times that those items are associated with, but don't let them drive you crazy in thinking about the past. I've certainly got a few nice things that were given to me by my ex, and the same is true for her. I appreciate those things, and they remind me of those particular good moments in my life... but, I don't obsess over them, and act like my life is over because of it. IT TAKES TIME.

3) GOOD LUCK! It sucks for a while, but it gets better. I assure you of that.

akv3g4n
March 13, 2013, 10:06 PM
Can someone please tell me how the heck you lose your guns to your wife in a divorce? I can see how it can happen if she steals them, but I don't see how it can happen otherwise.

I would imagine in a bitter divorce, a spouse may go after your guns just to spite you. IANAL but if they were purchased while you were together (depending on the state), then half of them could be hers. I'm sure a good divorce lawyer could easily seperate you from a portion of your collection.

Onward Allusion
March 13, 2013, 10:07 PM
WinThePennant
Can someone please tell me how the heck you lose your guns to your wife in a divorce? I can see how it can happen if she steals them, but I don't see how it can happen otherwise.

Assets are assets. Guns are assets and in most States it is equally divided or agreed upon. One party can force the other to sell 'em or give up the cash for 'em. You can imagine that some collections are worth tens of thousands and coughing up that kind of change quickly is tough. That's one way.

Another way is the spouse sell 'em from under you w/o your knowledge. Of course a good lawyer will get the dollars back in the form of a settlement, but hey your guns are gone.

A third way is that one is so distraught that they want to move on and forget about anything to do with the marriage. The object brings a person pain and they need to get rid of it.

I'm sure there are many other ways though.

WinThePennant
March 13, 2013, 10:13 PM
If she wants the guns, then why not place a value on them and substitute another asset?

Of course, if she's a total B then all bets are off.

Ehtereon11B
March 14, 2013, 01:28 AM
One of my ex's got a couple of my guns, miss the guns way more than her.

Ain't that the truth. I bought a Walther P22 for my ex girlfriend for Christmas. She kept it because it was the only one she could load. All 1300 rounds too. Which at today's prices would be great to flip.

rondog
March 14, 2013, 01:37 AM
Man, I don't see how you guys can put down your own dog with a firearm. I couldn't do that to one of my girls no matter what. I could hold one in my arms while a vet gives "the shot", but not with a gun myself. No way. I'd lose it.

But the divorce thing....that's another reason why I won't get one, I don't want to sacrifice my collection just to get free. I've suffered all these years, what's a few more. This is Colorado, and the man always loses in a divorce.

coloradokevin
March 14, 2013, 01:45 AM
Man, I don't see how you guys can put down your own dog with a firearm. I couldn't do that to one of my girls no matter what. I could hold one in my arms while a vet gives "the shot", but not with a gun myself. No way. I'd lose it.

But the divorce thing....that's another reason why I won't get one, I don't want to sacrifice my collection just to get free. I've suffered all these years, what's a few more. This is Colorado, and the man always loses in a divorce.

Yeah, while I suppose people have put down their own dogs for centuries, I had a vet do it when my last dog's day came. I've killed plenty of things over the years, but killing my own dog isn't something I think I could stomach.

As for your marital situation, it sounds like the way one of my coworkers described his: "I'm twenty years into a life sentence, and there's no parole board".

I only lost one gun in my divorce, but I don't really call it a loss. It was a gun I had purchased for my ex (it was hers), but I used it from time-to-time myself as a CCW gun. Just had to go get myself another one after I recovered financially.

788Ham
March 14, 2013, 01:45 AM
WinThePennant,

Thats what it boiled down to ! The ex sold them to a Denver cop for $500 cash. SO, when the house sold, and she had to give me my 1/2 of the equity in it, I told her I wanted it in cash, new Franklin's, my attorney made sure they were all new too. lol

bannockburn
March 14, 2013, 07:31 AM
Tony50ae

I have always believed that guns that are family heirlooms or that you have received as a gift should never be sold; unless there's a financial emergency that needs to be dealt with immediately and selling your guns is the quickest way to handle the situation. Other than that you should keep the guns and use and enjoy them the best way that you can. Remember the spirit in which they were given and not by the memory of the one who gave them to you.

Russ Jackson
March 14, 2013, 08:13 AM
She dumped you for a new model. She will most likely do the same thing to the new guy in time. Hopefully you are not to old to start over and get on with it. The gun is a gun its not her. She cheated on you she should get nothing but the door.

valnar
March 14, 2013, 09:39 AM
My Ex never liked me having guns, 'tis one of the reasons she is now my Ex. if you love somebody, they shouldn't make you choose. (Not the only reason for the divorce of course, but I'm keeping with the theme of the thread) ;)

MachIVshooter
March 14, 2013, 12:43 PM
Man, I don't see how you guys can put down your own dog with a firearm. I couldn't do that to one of my girls no matter what. I could hold one in my arms while a vet gives "the shot", but not with a gun myself. No way. I'd lose it.

It's a very personal thing, and I understand and respect that many can't do it. I'm a country boy, and out here you just do what you have to do. For me, there's no sense in forcing the old, decrepit animal into a vehicle and driving to the place they hate to have some stranger stick them and then watch the life drain out of their eyes.

In the hours preceding, my critters get lots of love and a big steak, then we take a walk. I sit down next to them, love on them until they're very sedate, then slowly stand up and put one in the base of the skull point blank. They never see it coming, don't feel a thing.

MagnumDweeb
March 14, 2013, 01:05 PM
I'm glad the OP chose to keep his rifle. I can tell as an attorney who handles a lot of divorces. Guns and who keeps them has been an issue as of late. I was at a mediation where the "assault rifles" were an issue. The wife never liked guns but she had gotten hip to the potential investment value of the guns. I represented the wife. The husband had bought some nice guns during the marriage and my client was demanding half of their value in cash which worked out to $3,000 by blue book value based on 90% condition if I remember right.

Thankfully this was a marriage ending where both sides were on relatively good financial footing. Both had good jobs making more than 50K a piece and for a sixteen year marriage the husband agreed to give up twenty percent of the income gap for ten years as alimony (which is not that much when considered in relative terms). The wife agreed to walk away from the house in exchange for the alimony and taking both the cars (and the house was under water) and her jewelry collection which was assessed at over ten grand (not that much when you consider sixteen years of marriage).

But she would just not budge over the guns. By the time it was done she walked away with four of his ten rifles (two AR-15s tacky-cooled to the max, one AK Variant, and one nice Ruger rifle) and five of his ten pistols (three H&K pistols, one Colt 1911, and one J-Frame S&W). Now she wants to learn how to shoot them. Oh and we had to argue over 30 round magazines. The lawyer on the other side and I laughed over the idea of quibling over the magazines and their value. We're both gun guys.

I talked with the other lawyer and the husband with the mediator while the wife was out of the room to smooth things over. I played up the replaceability of the guns as most of them were five years or older and he got to keep the nicer end younger guns. He gave up some ammo for the guns while I was at it and I couldn't stop laughing as I was drafting up the mediated agreement with the Mediator's staff. It was a first for sure.

But remember this guys, when you buy a gun while you are married, it is likely marital property (states may differ and I'm only licensed in Florida). So buy her jewelry every time you buy a gun. A good gold heavy piece of jewelry you bought at a pawn shop based on its gold value at thirty percent the value of gold by weight (don't pay for the diamonds as they say). Keep the receipts nice and safe and should it ever come down to it, you have a bargaining chip. The only thing more valuable than guns right now is gold. So be mindful to buy your lead and gold gentleman.

Or hire a frigging lawyer and get a good Pre-nup done where the wife waives her rights to owning guns bought during the marriage, in exchange for the husband waiving his right to owning jewelry bought during the marriage. And yes this can be done in a post-nup. Again talk to a lawyer and consider hiring one.

jfrey
March 14, 2013, 01:38 PM
My EX tried to get me to sel all my guns at public auction and split the proceeds with her. She forgot, until my attorney pointed it out to her, that guns as a gift aren't community property in Texas. She kept it up until I brought up all her jewelery I bought. Then she shut her mouth. I didn't have that many in the first place but she had bought me a Winchester O/U shotgun. A few years later, my new wife bought me a Beretta O/U shotgun so I sold the Winchester and bought her a Beretta too.

As usual, my EX got the goldmine and I got the shaft, so the story goes. Now after 22+ years in a lot better marriage, I have a bunch of guns and my wife has a rich daddy and things are a lot better than before. This on has proved to be a real keeper.

Russ Jackson
March 14, 2013, 01:51 PM
It's a very personal thing, and I understand and respect that many can't do it. I'm a country boy, and out here you just do what you have to do. For me, there's no sense in forcing the old, decrepit animal into a vehicle and driving to the place they hate to have some stranger stick them and then watch the life drain out of their eyes.

In the hours preceding, my critters get lots of love and a big steak, then we take a walk. I sit down next to them, love on them until they're very sedate, then slowly stand up and put one in the base of the skull point blank. They never see it coming, don't feel a thing.
I cannot see paying someone to do it for me. I love dogs but it is a dog.

Rocketmedic
March 15, 2013, 06:26 AM
My ex-wife had a few questionable sexual encounters with multiple partners simultaneously in my F150 while I was deployed and recorded it with my camera. Still have the truck and camera, although I was cinsidering trading the truck in. Theres a lot of good and bad memories associated, but what saved it was the financial foolishness of selling it.

My guns are all associated with my wife and good friends out shooting. She turned me on to revolvers, and I converted her to 1911s.

raa-7
March 15, 2013, 11:48 AM
Yeah Tony,I can definately relate ! I,ve been divorced for 14yrs now, from an 18 year marriage and I have a few things that just bring me back so vividly sometimes,but ya gotta learn to deal with things like that,If you dont like it.I would sell it and buy a ROA :D(only because I want one like,now!But seriously sell it and get something you really would like and there wont be any thing tied to it.

coyote315
March 15, 2013, 12:36 PM
exact same thing here. To us, putting down your own dog is a final act of love and responsibility and animal husbandry, from someone who understands the gravity of the decision with actual love for the animal, so the act of execution requires a steadfast commitment that it is the most loving option at the time. And, it is easier for me to look back on because i know I was that committed, at that time with the information I had, that it WAS the best decision. No second-guessing later. If I hadn't believed it, I couldn't have done it the first time.

22-rimfire
March 15, 2013, 12:41 PM
I view guns as community property in a marriage. Guns that are gifts stay with the receiver just like a wedding ring. Any firearms brought into the marriage remain with the orginal owner (vs shared), guns purchased after the marriage are just property to be disposed of one way or another. The party that wants the post marriage guns should make a deal with the other party based on value.

Aiko492
March 15, 2013, 05:43 PM
My ex-wife had a few questionable sexual encounters with multiple partners simultaneously in my F150 while I was deployed and recorded it with my camera. Still have the truck and camera, although I was cinsidering trading the truck in. Theres a lot of good and bad memories associated, but what saved it was the financial foolishness of selling it.

My guns are all associated with my wife and good friends out shooting. She turned me on to revolvers, and I converted her to 1911s.
Good lord, are you serious?

HoosierQ
March 15, 2013, 05:56 PM
When my wife issued me my walking papers back in '93 she had a list of stuff I got to keep and the stuff she got to keep...all ready to go.

ME

All the guns.
The boat.
The truck.
The big screen TV.
ALL the bank accounts and the money in them.

SHE

House.
Dogs.
The car.

My response: WHERE DO I SIGN?!?! It wasn't quite that painless but things are things and I got the things that meant the most to me.

EmbarkChief
March 15, 2013, 06:42 PM
LOL, when it was my turn all I cared about was the gun safe and everything in it. She got the house, cars, pets, and her jewelry.

Rocketmedic
March 15, 2013, 06:55 PM
Unfortunately, yes.

kidcoltoutlaw
March 15, 2013, 07:00 PM
When I get rid of a woman or they get rid of me I buy a new gun or 2. I forget all about them then,

Thanks,Keith

MachIVshooter
March 16, 2013, 02:40 AM
When my wife issued me my walking papers back in '93 she had a list of stuff I got to keep and the stuff she got to keep...all ready to go.

ME

All the guns.
The boat.
The truck.
The big screen TV.
ALL the bank accounts and the money in them.

SHE

House.
Dogs.
The car.

My response: WHERE DO I SIGN?!?! It wasn't quite that painless but things are things and I got the things that meant the most to me.

"Goin' through the big D and don't mean Dallas, I got the truck and she got the palace....."

(points if you sang it, extra points if you know the artist ;))

ridgerunner1965
March 16, 2013, 08:30 PM
yu guys never hear of a pre nup?my second wife asked for one.not sure why since she was eyeball deep in debt.i redialy agreed as i was debt free and had quite a bit of property.i paid off her debt, sold the rediculous car she gave twice to much for, paid off her trailer she gave too much for.moved the trailer to my land and resold it buyer defualted after paying more than the trailer was werth.resold trailer for scrap and made a profit big time.took me a few years but i made a profit on a girl that cost me a lot of money.

coyote315
March 16, 2013, 08:54 PM
Rocketmedic's account is unfortunately the standard. Hopefully she didn't SEND HIM THE DVD while he was deployed:

Some wives do.

Not realizing they've just given us video image of their lover for PID :)

Jspy
March 17, 2013, 12:19 PM
I was in a similar situation a few years back myself. In my case it was a pistol that I had hardly used thru the years but long story short I still have it, and it doesn't really hold any sentimental attachment. I may be different but I think time will have a way of distancing yourself with the connection. I would keep it and let time run its course.

Rocketmedic
March 18, 2013, 07:24 AM
Yeah...it was on my SD card. Made divorce easy, but the other girl wasnt even hot.

The ex is apparently up in Tulsa or something. My wife and I are in Yukon, loving life. Shes got more guns than I do (1944 M44, Rock Island 1911, Mossberg 12g M500).

Karma.

bikerdoc
March 18, 2013, 08:46 AM
Nasty divorce in 96 after 24 yrs still has me seeking revenge and several guns she got especially the Singer 1911.

coyote315
March 18, 2013, 03:27 PM
R'medic: This is the internet. When you tell the story, they were ALL hott ! :p

TNboy
March 18, 2013, 04:13 PM
I got a shotgun for my ex wife. Both me and the guy I traded with were happy. I kid!

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