Which .222 Rem?


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Scrumbag
March 14, 2013, 05:46 AM
Hello folks am in the market for a CF .22 and thinking a .222 Remington.

Any suggestions on make and model?

Thanks in advance,

Scrummy

(PS Can't do 223 due to military round restrictions)

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bluekouki86
March 14, 2013, 06:39 AM
I've got an old Remington 700 in .222 Remington Magnum. It is a fine rifle although the caliber is dead and gone.

kyhunter
March 14, 2013, 07:17 AM
.222 remington although not as powerful. much easier to find ammo for than the .222 rem mag

WoodchuckAssassin
March 14, 2013, 08:19 AM
Dead and gone? I don't accept that! I just shot one this past weekend - an old Winchester M70 bull-barrel - and it was easy to pickup a box at the local gun shop.

So I guess my money would go on the Winchester m70, since that's the only .222 I've ever shot.

meanmrmustard
March 14, 2013, 08:24 AM
Hello folks am in the market for a CF .22 and thinking a .222 Remington.

Any suggestions on make and model?

Thanks in advance,

Scrummy

(PS Can't do 223 due to military round restrictions)
What about 22-250?

I like this chambering, probably in a Tikka T3.

Scrumbag
March 14, 2013, 08:28 AM
"What about 22-250?

I like this chambering, probably in a Tikka T3. "

I thought about the .22-250 but ammo seems to be expensive and I'm thinking about starting reloadind & I understand .222 Rem is one of the easiest to reload.

Also, is the the .22-250 a bit of a barrel burner?

ATB,

Scrummy

Hopkins
March 14, 2013, 09:52 AM
The .222 Remington is easily one of the most inherently accurate factory loaded 22 caliber rounds available. It's very easy to reload for and you will be spoiled by its performance. It is not popular in the U.S. because of the obsession with the .223. It's very difficult to find and purchase used .222's in the U.S. because they bring premium and their owners hang on to them. I'm not aware of any chamberings of the round by a U.S. manufacturer in quite a few years. I suspect they are more readily available in European markets.
As an additional benefit, the round is significantly quieter than 22-250 or higher velocity .22's

Scrumbag
March 14, 2013, 10:38 AM
Ah that explains why I can only find new rifles in .222 Rem. from CZ

(Looked at Ruger, Browning & Winchester and was surprised no .222Rem rifles).

In some parts of Europe (France & Italy inparticular) you can't own military calibres hence perhaps why the Europeans have larger markets for .222 rather than .223.

ATB,

Scrummy

Hopkins
March 14, 2013, 11:25 AM
After owning a gun store some years ago I came to the conclusion that the U.S. market for precision marksmanship is very small. The market is about sound and fury. The .222 is like the .22 Hornet in this country. It has a small following because of its performance. The .222 is far superior to the Hornet and was very popular with U.S. bench rest shooters until its accuracy performance was surpassed by the .22PPC.
The development of the cartridge is credited to Mike Walker of Remington who sadly passed away last week.

Lj1941
March 14, 2013, 11:28 AM
The 222 Remington is an excellent cartridge that has all of the good things going for it that the 223 has except it has a little less powder capacity and is not as readily availible as the 223 ,at least here in the USA. I am surprised that in your country the 223 is forbidden.I thought that silly regulations were only in effect here in the USA.:)

Scrumbag
March 14, 2013, 11:48 AM
"The 222 Remington is an excellent cartridge that has all of the good things going for it that the 223 has except it has a little less powder capacity and is not as readily availible as the 223 ,at least here in the USA. I am surprised that in your country the 223 is forbidden.I thought that silly regulations were only in effect here in the USA"

I'm in Switzerland and we don't really have very restrictive gun laws (I'm from the UK, believe me I know about those...) The non-military chamberings really comes from France (which I'm 5k from the border of). Basically, if I have non-mil chamberings, life is relatively simple. Military rounds are a lot more beauracracy and you can't hunt with them... So .222 makes a lot of sense from a "hassle" point of view even if not as common as .223 today.

ATB,

Scrummy

Jim Watson
March 14, 2013, 12:21 PM
I don't know the current availability even in Europe, but another cartridge in the same family is the 5.6x50 (and 5.6x50R for break actions.) It is a close relation to the .222 Remington Magnum.

I read that it came about because every gunsmith was grinding his own .222 Magnum reamer and all were a bit different, which led to troubles with headspace control, etc. So RWS standardized the 5.6x50 to get it under DIN specifications.

EmbarkChief
March 14, 2013, 01:56 PM
I have an old Remington bolt gun in .222 w/ a Weaver 4x that was passed down from my grandfather. It has become one of my favorite rifles for small game, precision plinking, and training new shooters. Ammo is surprisingly easy to find, however I haven't looked for any in a year or two.

TexasPatriot.308
March 14, 2013, 02:05 PM
.222 in Remington model 788....hard to beat.

Skyshot
March 14, 2013, 07:48 PM
Any .222 should be a tack driver. Even my little sporter barrel CZ527 will shoot sub MOA with anything run through it.

meanmrmustard
March 14, 2013, 09:03 PM
"What about 22-250?

I like this chambering, probably in a Tikka T3. "

I thought about the .22-250 but ammo seems to be expensive and I'm thinking about starting reloadind & I understand .222 Rem is one of the easiest to reload.

Also, is the the .22-250 a bit of a barrel burner?

ATB,

Scrummy
22-250 is no harder to reload, and is much more potent. My shooting buddy has many rounds through his precision M700, and several South Dakota prarie dog hunts under his belt with that gun. Still going strong, still sub MOA.

$13 a box of 20 isn't expensive, and PPU brass is supposedly top notch.

murf
March 14, 2013, 09:42 PM
sako 85 varmint

murf

ole farmerbuck
March 14, 2013, 09:44 PM
I bought a new Savage last year. I think it's a model 25. Havent shot it much but I have a feeling it's gonna be a shooter.
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn88/farmerbuck/222Savagejpg.jpg

Blackrock
March 14, 2013, 09:48 PM
What Tex says. I have a Rem 788 in .222 that is a tack driver. Also had a Rem 722 in the same caliber that while a good shooter wasn't as tight out to 300+ yards. I really like the little cartridge.

VancMike
March 14, 2013, 10:48 PM
I bought an older Savage Mdl 24 (combo 222 Rem/20 gauge) last year, fully intending to re-chamber the 222 into .223 (mostly since I already have a couple of those). It's an easy job....just ream it out from 1.700"/43.2mm to 1.76"/45mm.

But even with open sights, the .222 barrel is spooky accurate, and since the barrel has 1-14" twist, I'd probably be restricted to 35-50 gr. bullets anyway. So I bought a set of Lee triple-deuce dies, a couple of hundred brass, and, with the plethora of 35-50 gr. bullets I already have for my .223s, I'm set (incidentally, despite the Obama-panic in the US, one can still buy all the 222 brass one needs at Midway and Cabela's). I've not fired any 35 gr. bullets yet, but 45 & 50 gr. bullets will group as well as my eyes and buckhorn sights will allow. My best is .85" @ 50 yds.

Don't know if you're looking for a combo gun, but if you can find one, the Mdl 24 is an idea. Yeah, it's pretty crude when compared to those fine German drillings, putting a scope on it sort of negates the use of the shotgun, but it's been a throw-it-behind-the-pickup-seat-in-case-you-see-a-varmint-or-pheasant gun for several generations of rural Americans.

Having said that.....I'd get that way-cool CZ in the Mannlicher stock in a heartbeat. I don't like that Euro-droop stock......but, hey, you're in Europe.....

Abel
March 14, 2013, 11:36 PM
The Ruger #1.

http://www.ruger.com/products/no1LightSporter/models.html

Walkalong
March 15, 2013, 12:16 AM
I've got an old Remington 700 in .222 Remington Magnum. It is a fine rifle although the caliber is dead and gone.Not as long as brass can be had. :)

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=153318&stc=1&d=1322147543

The .222 Mag is the ballistic equivalent of the .223 as far as factory loads go, but can eclipse the .223 if you handload, with about 5% more case capacity, assuming you load it to .223 pressures.

Scrumbag
March 15, 2013, 04:56 AM
Thanks for the info folks, keep 'em coming.

Scrummy

eastbank
March 15, 2013, 07:50 AM
.222 cases are easy to get,i bought 500 some time ago from graf. here is my .222 remington 722 along with its bigger brother a 721 in 30-06, the 722 is on the bottom. both early guns in ex condition. the 722 and 721 remingtons started alot of rifle men on the way due to their low cost,but they were a better value than their cost reflected. eastbank.

bluekouki86
March 15, 2013, 08:06 AM
Not as long as brass can be had.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachmen...1&d=1322147543

The .222 Mag is the ballistic equivalent of the .223 as far as factory loads go, but can eclipse the .223 if you handload, with about 5% more case capacity, assuming you load it to .223 pressures.

Nice rifle Walkalong!

I am buying brass as I come across it, this rifle is the reason I have a Hornaday lock'n'load press on the way to my house. Looking forward to trying it out.

BigG
March 15, 2013, 08:10 AM
I recommend a Steyr Mannlicher if you want a top quality rifle.

Scrumbag
March 17, 2013, 12:40 PM
Steyr Mannlichers are indeed good rifles, I just prefer M98 type actions...

Jim Watson
March 17, 2013, 12:48 PM
I do not know of a true '98 action rifle in .222; not on this side of the pond at any rate.
It works for .22-250 or 5.7x57 RWS, though.

natman
March 17, 2013, 01:17 PM
Dead and gone? I don't accept that! I just shot one this past weekend - an old Winchester M70 bull-barrel - and it was easy to pickup a box at the local gun shop.

So I guess my money would go on the Winchester m70, since that's the only .222 I've ever shot.
The poster you're replying to said 222 Remington MAGNUM, which, alas, is indeed obsolete.

DM~
March 17, 2013, 08:40 PM
Over the years i've had several .222's, with the most accurate being a Shilen action, McMilan bbl BR rifle i had back in the day when i shot BR.

Anyway, i've never had a .222 that wasn't an excellent shooter, and this Savage 2400 (that i still have) is no exception,

http://fototime.com/F3F9A6CBAA1E929/standard.jpg

I've made some fantastic shots on small game with that gun, using reloaded ammo, with bullets i made from spent 22LR cases!

DM

Savage99
March 18, 2013, 01:06 AM
Search for a popular cartridge in a rifle that you prefer. The .222 bolt face actions may be more limited there than those of 22-250 or .220 Swift bolts.

Cartridges can be loaded down but not up.

The old .222 Rem 722 was a cheap gun. All stampings, no machinery.

Sako made some beautiful rifles and there may be others there from Europe.

Also the .22 Hornet may be found there. I never liked that round for it's weak brass.

For varmints I have had many rifles. Of late I carry the Swift more just because.

Here is an old High Wall in .219 Improved Zipper.

http://imageshack.us/a/img856/1227/dsc011589jr.jpg

Scrumbag
March 18, 2013, 06:43 AM
Jim, you are right. I would settle for something looking like a 98 rather than true 98. I do like CRF though...

Scrumbag
March 18, 2013, 06:45 AM
Savage99, love the setting!

Hopkins
March 19, 2013, 09:39 AM
Simply loading a 220 Swift or 22-250 down will not yield the inherent accuracy that the .222 enjoys. If cartridge design could be reduced to a velocity and projectile set of variables that delivered uniform results there would be very few case designs. The Swift and 22-250 are the go to .22's for varmint hunting performance but don't shine in the bench rest tests. Until the 6 & 22PPC pushed it out of the way .222 was an easy choice for that task. I doubt many 22-250 and Swift advocates would be quiet long if they had to listen to claims that the .223 is an equal to or superior varmint cartridge choice to the Swift and 22-250.

Hopkins
March 19, 2013, 09:18 PM
I noticed in another forum that Savage chambers several versions of the Model 25 in .222 Remington.

6.5swede
March 23, 2013, 11:36 PM
Hard to beat a Sako L461 Vixen in 222 or L46 Riihimaki. They pop up on various gun auction sites fairly frequently. Very well made, balanced rifles with an action designed for the 222 cartridge.

http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff366/gausi641/IMG_1772_zps2696dfeb.jpg

Bushpilot
March 24, 2013, 05:17 PM
The .222 has always been one of my personal favorites. I have a plain looking old Remington 788, 222 that has had a trigger job and glass bedding with a 12X Leupold scope that will easily out-shoot many rifles that cost several times as much with almost any ammo I run through it. I haven't personally seen or shot anything that is similar in weight or barrel profile that can readily surpass it. Now I'm certain that there are many other 222s or 22 and 6mm PPC sporters out there that will surely best it, but I'm also sure that they cost much, much more than the $200 I paid for my 788! I also have a Remington model 7, 222 that is no slouch accuracy wise either and makes for a very handy little varmint rifle. Not that I need another 222 but next one I buy will be the CZ....

roc1
March 24, 2013, 05:20 PM
My vote goes to the old Remington model 788 I have if you can find one. I found mine in a pawn shop couple yrs ago.
Roc1

Scrumbag
March 25, 2013, 05:08 PM
Interesting the support for older Remingtons though I am leaning towards a CZ or even an older BSA...

husker
March 25, 2013, 08:44 PM
I would like to toss out the old Remington 600s & Mo-Hawk 600s,
But I cant/Man they just want way to much for them anymore.

redmule
March 25, 2013, 09:59 PM
The duce is just a very useful everyday gun. Hard to beat in any of its renditions . Mine is an older Remington 700 ADL with a 10X Redfield. Just a great rifle.

Rusty

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