What would you like to see in a new revolver design?


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Colt451985
March 19, 2013, 04:00 PM
Say you own a machine shop with 5-axis CNC machining centers, CNC turning centers, Wire EDM, digital optical comparators, NDT, and so on, and you want your company to get into the firearm industry in a big way. Like any good businessman, you need to find a niche. One potential niche that might exist is custom revolvers.

By "custom revolver," I mean a revolver design that can be personalized and customized by its owner as easily as the AR-15, 1911, Remington 700, and 10/22. I'm not just talking about swapping a factory barrel and a trigger job. I'm talking about making unique weapons with aftermarket barrels, triggers, hammers, and small parts machined from the highest quality materials.

In other words, the "Ed Brown" or "Wilson Combat" of revolvers.

I'm interested in what you folks would like to see introduced in the revolver market. I'm especially interested in what gunsmiths would like to see.

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Thaddeus Jones
March 19, 2013, 04:08 PM
A break top 7-shot 357. Blue or stainless. Air guaged 4 inch match grade barrel. 5.5lb trigger. Adjustable sights. :)

golden
March 19, 2013, 04:35 PM
I like the idea of a top break, but I would add a 5 shot in 9m.m. P or .38 Special +P and keep the weight down with an aluminum or polymer frame.

I want a 10 pound (MAX) double action trigger and concealed or bobbed hammer. Option of a tritium night sight on the front sight post would be great as well and a 3 inch barrel as well.

Also, get the trigger right with something similar to the PACHMAYR COMPAC Professional grip.

A convertible .22 LR and .22 Magnum might be an interesting variation.

One more would be a .32 H&R Magnum 5 shot with the frame and cylinder scaled down to size instead of using a 6 shot gun that is just as big as the 5 shot .38 Specials.

Use the FEDERAL Hydro Shok bullet made for the .327 magnum and it just might be a perfect pocket gun.

Jim

savit260
March 19, 2013, 04:46 PM
I think a 5 shot 9mm top break the size of a 38 S&W Safety Hammerless made of modern metal with modern sights. Give it a Charter Arms style ejector star for ejecting the rimless cartridge, and I'd bet you'd sell a ton of them.

The 9mm chambering could make it shorter and maybe a touch skinnier than the orginal Lemon Squeezer Saftey Hammerless and definitly smaller than a J frame.

In other words, the "Ed Brown" or "Wilson Combat" of revolvers.


Those already exsist in the works of Bowen, Harton, Stroh, Linebaugh, Reeder etc. etc.

Ruger single actions being one of the favorites to build off of.

jeffmack
March 19, 2013, 05:08 PM
I would like to second what Thaddeus wrote about the top-break 7-shot 357. I also wish somebody would start making revolvers with Dan Wesson Pistol Pac style barrels again.

glider1
March 19, 2013, 05:38 PM
Something like the Dan Wesson revolvers but with interchangable cylinders and barrels. 1 revolver that you could have a 45c, 44 spec., or 38 spec. cylinders and barrels for in different lengths. I'd be happy with that. Forget the plastic. You could even offer custom bore cylinders and barrels, kinda like a thompson contender. Sell a high quality revolver and then sell cylinders and barrels for it for the next 10 years.

hovercat
March 19, 2013, 05:47 PM
Eliminate the crane. Push the release button and a flick of the wrist, cylinder pops out the right side. Snap a new one in from the left, without taking the sights off target. No more speedloaders, spare cylinders. Have to have some sort of clip to hold rounds in place.
The blackpowder guys used to do similar, but I bet it can be done so that the average Joe or Jane can reload with the ease of a Glock.
That would be my selling point. The reliability and simplicity of a revolver with the easy reload of a semi-auto.

CraigC
March 19, 2013, 06:22 PM
Custom single actions based on the Old Model Ruger Blackhawk design, made with Freedom Arms level of precision. Every grip frame imaginable, Ruger Bisley, Colt Bisley, SAA/XR3, 1860 Army, etc.. Every top strap configuration imaginable from Ruger flat-top, Colt flat-top, Keith #5, Seyfried #13, dovetail Single Six, pre-war S&W, Colt 2nd generation SAA, etc.. Round, octagon, ovate and ribbed barrels. Various styles of front sight bases including something sculpted like Jim Stroh's, barrel bands, dovetails, Colt flat-top target style sights. Lightweight conversions. Three frame sizes including something comparable to the Single Six in six shot rimfires, .32H&R and .327Fed, plus five shot .38Spl's and .41Spl's. A medium frame like the Old Model .357 in various chamberings, plus five-shot .44Mag's, .45Colt's, .475Cooper, .50GI and .500Spl (.500S&W at .44Spl length). On the large frame, all the usual chamberings plus five-shot .45Colt, .475Linebaugh, .500Linebaugh, .500 S&W 1.4" and .50Spl.

Dlowe167
March 19, 2013, 06:52 PM
Glider has the idea. But lighter DA trigger. Revolver triggers are some of the worst. Got a Taurus Raging Judge its a mule of a trigger

Piraticalbob
March 19, 2013, 06:55 PM
Stainless steel top-break in .22LR with a spur trigger. Larger than a NAA mini-revolver, but smaller than a J-Frame. Would make a great backcountry kit gun.

AFDavis11
March 19, 2013, 07:04 PM
I have a weird niche interest based on a comment I read a few decades ago. I would be interested in an aluminum framed, 4 shot, revolver. One in 45acp or 44 Spec and one in .38 Spec.

Probably with a high vis front sight.

To me it would be the ultimate in reliable back-up/deep concealment.

wvtarheel
March 19, 2013, 07:05 PM
Interchangeable barrel length revolvers. I believe Dan Wesson did something like this in the 70s. I would love to have a 357 with a 6 inch barrel for target shooting and a snubbie barrel in case I want to carry it.

I have also heard the rumor, that something about the way the interchangable barrels were constructed, and the way they were threaded, increased accuracy tremendously, a benefit that Wesson did not intend but took full credit for. I heard that talking to some old guys that shot competition in the late 1970s. Apparently when the Dan Wesson revolvers started showing up everyone was looking at them like they were dogs, with all their crazy features (interchangable barrel length) and super heavy frames. Then the Dan Wesson revolvers started winning competitions....

Just my two cents

Cosmoline
March 19, 2013, 07:20 PM
My dream has always been a Speed Six in .44 Special. A few have been constructed over the years, but never mass produced. But the devil is in the details, and quality revolvers are not easy to make.

oneounceload
March 19, 2013, 07:30 PM
As a LH, I would like to see an ambidextrous revolver- think like the semi HK P7 - with cylinder that could open either way for RH or LH shooters with the release in the same vein. It should have swappable barrels so you could lengthen or shorten - think Dan Wesson - and swappable cylinders - think Ruger, in centerfire rounds like 38, 9mm, 40, 45ACP, etc.......

savit260
March 19, 2013, 07:58 PM
Revolver triggers are some of the worst. Got a Taurus Raging Judge its a mule of a trigger

Huh??

Kind of like saying "Motorcycles handle the worst. Got a H-D Fat Boy and it corners like dump truck." lol


Give a "good one" a try.

Cosmoline
March 19, 2013, 08:28 PM
I think if you're looking to customize you'd need to explore polymer frames like the LCR. A modular revolver like the old Dan Wesson's, but with the entire cylinder/barrel assembly as a modular upper to the lower with the trigger group, hammer and grip.

Tough to do right, maybe too tough. But if it could be done it would be pretty sweet.

Mat, not doormat
March 19, 2013, 09:27 PM
A modern top-break .45 ACP, that accepts moonclips. The GI bring-back Webleys have one of the niftiest reloads in the revolver world. Press lever, snap gun down to belt, gun opens and ejects, while you grab another moon. Drop in, snap up, fire. Rinse, repeat. Just make one that works, has a nice trigger, modern sights, etc. Give it just a stud to attach grips to, a la the Super Redhawk, that way people can make any grip they like to put on it.

Colt451985
March 19, 2013, 09:35 PM
Those already exsist in the works of Bowen, Harton, Stroh, Linebaugh, Reeder etc. etc.

I respectfully disagree. While these gentlemen are true craftsmen, they are limited to modifying mass produced revolvers made by Smith & Wesson, Ruger, Colt, and so on. They generally do not machine their own parts for their revolvers. In comparison, Ed Brown and Wilson Combat machine all of their own parts for their 1911s. I believe there is a niche for an "Ed Brown" or "Wilson Combat" of revolvers that machines all of their own parts for a new revolver design that can be personalized and customized to its users taste, wants, and needs.

theboyscout
March 19, 2013, 09:50 PM
I like the idea of one revolver that can shoot the 45c, 44 spec., or 357 (so it can shoot the 357 and 38 spec).
The other post I thought was good 7-shot 357 or a 7-shot 44

Nickel Plated
March 19, 2013, 09:53 PM
The 9mm chambering could make it shorter and maybe a touch skinnier than the orginal Lemon Squeezer Saftey Hammerless and definitly smaller than a J frame.

In theory a 9mm chambering would give you a shorter revolver. In reality, you can only make the revolver so short before the cylinder gap is sitting right over your trigger finger. not a good place for it to be.
Why do you think all the 9mm revolvers made to date have had essentially 38spl.-length cylinders that are quite a bit longer than they need to be.

Waywatcher
March 19, 2013, 09:56 PM
A new fangled ultimate carry revolver. It would be a 6 shooter with a 3" barrel for a full length ejector rod and chambered in .38 +P, with a concealed hammer like a S&W centennial or LCR. I'd like to see it made along the lines of the LCR with titanium and polymer components for durability and light weight; just omitting the lock. A version with a 4" barrel would be easy to offer as well.

C0untZer0
March 19, 2013, 10:10 PM
a 9mm revolver with a cylinder sized for the 9mm (not 38 spl), and a frame sized for 9mm so the window fit the cylinder.

6" barrel and adjustable rear sites.

Colt451985
March 19, 2013, 10:21 PM
Interchangeable barrel length revolvers. I believe Dan Wesson did something like this in the 70s. I would love to have a 357 with a 6 inch barrel for target shooting and a snubbie barrel in case I want to carry it.

I have also heard the rumor, that something about the way the interchangable barrels were constructed, and the way they were threaded, increased accuracy tremendously, a benefit that Wesson did not intend but took full credit for. I heard that talking to some old guys that shot competition in the late 1970s. Apparently when the Dan Wesson revolvers started showing up everyone was looking at them like they were dogs, with all their crazy features (interchangable barrel length) and super heavy frames. Then the Dan Wesson revolvers started winning competitions....

Just my two cents

Dan Wesson's design was interesting. The design incorporated a barrel liner, barrel shroud, and barrel nut. The owner of the revolver assembles the barrel to the frame by placing a thickness gauge or feeler gauge between the cylinder and forcing cone. The barrel is then threaded into the frame and tightened until it is snug against the thickness gauge. The thickness gauge is then removed and the barrel shroud is placed over the barrel. When placing the barrel shroud over the barrel, there is a pin that indexes against the frame to position the barrel shroud in the correct orientation. The final step for assembly is to thread the barrel nut to the threads on the muzzle end of the barrel and tighten using the supplied spanner wrench. The barrel nut locks the barrel and barrel shroud in place. Because a thickness gauge is used during assembly, the barrel to cylinder gap can be repeatably and precisely set to the owners preference.

The flaw in the design, at least to some, is having to sight-in or zero the sights every time the barrel is changed. To some people, having to constantly mess with the sights every time you want to change the barrel length or handling characteristics is not worth the trouble. For these people, having multiple revolvers in different barrel lengths is preferable.

RugRev
March 19, 2013, 10:58 PM
Here are links to a couple of designs with interesting ideas:

http://www.jtl.de/english/revolver/revolver_e.htm

http://www.korthusa.com/start_en.htm

The Korth has an interesting shrouded coil mainspring to prevent snaking. The Janz has the interchangeable calibers some are after. I guess it depends upon how big a niche one seeks as to the unique design that would be offered. Right now I would think the market would be in the concealable small to medium frame (about the size of the old Colt D frame) 6 shot .357 or 9mm (interchangeable cylinders?) with the 3" bbl. For a lightweight field gun one could have something like a Diamondback with vent rib barrel. Hmm, if the barrels interchanged, too, one could have both on one frame. Build it out of Titanium and or stainless. Nothing wrong with polymer but if I pay a lot of money I want something for it. As this would be a smaller gun it could also be offered in the .32's and perhaps .22LR or Mag. Design the action for a quality low weight double action pull of around 7 lbs or so. Have interchangeable sights.

Tony_the_tiger
March 19, 2013, 11:01 PM
A 6 shot .44 special on a Gp100 frame but with a S&W style "slide" cylinder release instead of the push button on current Rugers with a 4" barrel and engraved with an Elmer Keith style hat.

Colt451985
March 19, 2013, 11:38 PM
I think if you're looking to customize you'd need to explore polymer frames like the LCR. A modular revolver like the old Dan Wesson's, but with the entire cylinder/barrel assembly as a modular upper to the lower with the trigger group, hammer and grip.

Tough to do right, maybe too tough. But if it could be done it would be pretty sweet.

Ruger was certainly inspired by the AR-15 and other similar firearm designs, which incorporate an upper and lower receiver. I too was thinking of something similar to the Ruger LCR and your suggestion. I'm gravitating towards this direction for my own design.

I disagree, however, that a polymer frame is necessary. Reducing the weight for a pocket revolver like the LCR makes sense, but revolvers are frequently chambered in hard recoiling cartridges such as the .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .454 Casull, and so on. Polymer frames are popular for semiautomatic pistols, but the recoil characteristics for the 9mm Luger, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP allow for lighter weight without being unpleasant or painful to shoot. The 10mm Auto is about the most powerful semiautomatic pistol cartridge available (that's practical in a recoil operated semiautomatic) and you'll notice that many people prefer to fire it in all-steel 1911s to reduce recoil. Furthermore, it appears that Smith & Wesson has not been very successful selling aluminum or scandium framed revolvers larger than the J-Frame. This could be for several reasons, but I suspect there aren't a lot of people who enjoy shooting a .44 Magnum or similar hard recoiling cartridge from a revolver that weighs less than 30 ounces.

A couple ideas that come to mind:

The lower receiver is the serialized "firearm" as far as the ATF is concerned. That gives the owner of the revolver the option of purchasing multiple monolithic upper receivers with different barrel lengths, handling characteristics, and sights. The sights stay with the barrel, so the owner does not need to sight-in or zero the revolver each time the barrel is changed. The word "monolithic" refers to the absence of a joint between the barrel and frame, or in this case, the upper receiver.

To install the barrel liner into the monolithic upper receiver can be done several ways. One way would be to incorporate a barrel nut similar to the Dan Wesson design. This would allow the owner of the revolver to adjust the barrel to cylinder gap to his or her preference by removing the barrel nut and tightening or loosening the barrel liner, which would move the forcing cone closer or further away from the cylinder. This would also allow the owner to replace the barrel liner.

Any barrel blank from well known barrel makers, such as Shilen, can be easily turned on a lathe into a barrel liner of the design I have in mind. Basically, the barrel liner is the same outside diameter as the inside diameter of the monolithic upper receiver. The monolithic upper receiver is tapped at the muzzle and the barrel liner is likewise threaded at the muzzle. The muzzle of the monolithic upper receiver is recessed and the barrel liner extends past the recess. A barrel nut is then threaded to the muzzle of the barrel liner and tightened to lock the barrel liner to the monolithic upper receiver. In other words, a gunsmith would buy any pistol barrel blank, turn the muzzle of the barrel liner to the outside diameter of the threads, thread the muzzle, turn the rest of the barrel liner to the inside diameter of the monolithic upper receiver, crown the muzzle of the barrel liner, and chamfer the forcing cone of the barrel liner.

While the barrel nut is tightened or loosened with a spanner wrench, the barrel liner is tightened or loosened into the monolithic upper receiver with a tool that engages the rifling. Both the spanner wrench for the barrel nut and the tool that engages the rifling would be supplied to the owner of the revolver.

guitarguy314
March 19, 2013, 11:44 PM
So so many guns I'd like. A modern day LeMat, more dan wesson type kits, Wildey and AMP auto mags...so many cool guns could be had.

Colt451985
March 19, 2013, 11:54 PM
Eliminate the crane. Push the release button and a flick of the wrist, cylinder pops out the right side. Snap a new one in from the left, without taking the sights off target. No more speedloaders, spare cylinders. Have to have some sort of clip to hold rounds in place.
The blackpowder guys used to do similar, but I bet it can be done so that the average Joe or Jane can reload with the ease of a Glock.
That would be my selling point. The reliability and simplicity of a revolver with the easy reload of a semi-auto.

One flaw I see in your idea is that, unlike a magazine for a semiautomatic pistol, a revolver cylinder does more than hold the cartridges. Whereas a magazine can be stamped from inexpensive sheet metal or molded from polymer, a revolver cylinder must be machined from expensive alloy and heat treated to withstand the pressure of a revolver cartridge. While your idea is interesting, I don't think there is much of a market for people who want to treat a cylinder that costs $100 or more like they would a $20 magazine. A cylinder also weighs quite a bit more than a magazine and carrying multiple cylinders would become cumbersome.

Jaymo
March 19, 2013, 11:56 PM
Chamelot Delvigne. French 1873 ordnance revolver, but made of modern steel and chambered for .45ACP and with a good DA trigger.

Revolver triggers are bad?
Have you ever shot a factory Glock? That is a wonky trigger.

Anyhoo, I'd want the Python brought back.

I really like the idea of the DW style revolver with interchangeable barrels and cylinders in different calibers.
One of the great things about the DW was that the barrel was under tension when installed.
A modern day LeMat with a break top frame would be sweet.

Of course, I wish someone (Ruger) would make a new copy of the Broomhandle Mauser chambered for .22 mag.
But, that's not a revolver.

A .45 ACP revolver with a frame window sized for it would be sweet, especially in a Charter Bulldog size.

JFrame
March 20, 2013, 12:08 AM
I see a lot of votes for break-tops here...

I'll add myself to that tally -- one each in .45 ACP and 9mm, please... :)


.

Jaymo
March 20, 2013, 12:12 AM
Break tops are cool like double barrel shotguns.

Colt451985
March 20, 2013, 12:12 AM
A .45 ACP revolver with a frame window sized for it would be sweet, especially in a Charter Bulldog size.

Reducing that dimension would put the barrel to cylinder gap perilously close to your trigger finger and, if using a two hand grip, the support hand. When firing a revolver, the hot expanding gases exiting from the barrel to cylinder gap could burn you if your skin is too close.

Jaymo
March 20, 2013, 12:35 AM
It could, but my hands aren't big enough for it to be a problem. Plus, it's a low pressure round. Less blowtorch effect.
Now, in .40 S&W or 9mm, I could definitely see a problem.
Plus, the S&W .45 ACP revolvers had a short cylinder with the barrel extending further into the frame window, putting the BC gap in the same place it would be with a shorter frame window.
I think the real reason they did that was the expense of building an entirely different frame, just for one caliber.
Now, it is true that the N frame cylinder is larger diameter than a Charter cyl and puts the BC gap higher, thus a little further from your hand.
I'd be good with a 6 shot .45 revolver with a shorter frame window.

Besides, I can dream, can't I?;)

Scipio Africanus
March 20, 2013, 01:33 AM
I would like an S&W N Frame capable of handling .454 Casull. Love my X frame, but it is too big to carry all the time. Four in barrel and six shot capacity a must. An X frame in .475 (Maximum)? A Scandium X frame with maybe a seven shot .44 mag cylinder, or even eight. I don't know if that is possible dimensionally. A 325 in .45 Colt, like the popular 329. (no not the darn "Governor")
Equipment rails made available on steel N frames, like the TR and M&P revolvers.
The return of a medium frame .44 special from S&W.

A double action revolver capable of handling the 45-70 and .50 Alaskan. :evil:

A factory Ruger Super Redhawk with a 4 to 5 in barrel in .454 Casull and .475 Linebaugh.
A factory Ruger Super Redhawk in .500 Linbaugh.
A Super Redhawk Alaskan in .500 Linebaugh.

Ok, none of this is radical design change, but I'm dreaming... :D

silvermane_1
March 20, 2013, 01:46 AM
medusa revolver+wesson pistol pac, nuff said

sidheshooter
March 20, 2013, 02:21 AM
Break top, 5-shot .44 spec; side latched for one-handed reloading, with a camming trigger like the LCR's-scaled up a bit-should be possible to make it even smoother and lighter with total reliability. Modular quick change grips so one could have more hand-filling or ultimate concealment with just the flip of a lever on the backstrap. Pinned/plungered in front sights in different heights and levels of light reflection and gathering to zero loads and accommodate differing uses.

If you really want to push the brain trust, figure out a way to seal the gap at the moment of firing and add a threaded barrel... it's been done....

bannockburn
March 20, 2013, 05:50 AM
Definitely some kind of updated top-break design, in three frame sizes that would go from small calibers (.22/.32), to medium (.38/9mm.), to large (.45/.44 Special).

Would love to see a modern version of the Webley-Fosbery automatic revolver.

Mp7
March 20, 2013, 06:43 AM
Something to fill the gap between NAA minis and the LCR.


an aluminium framed 4shot in 9mm would be nice. Or in 32Acp, or 22.mag?

Slender, but a good grip.

It would sell like mad, i bet.

hAkron
March 20, 2013, 06:55 AM
Something like the Dan Wesson revolvers but with interchangable cylinders and barrels. 1 revolver that you could have a 45c, 44 spec., or 38 spec. cylinders and barrels for in different lengths. I'd be happy with that. Forget the plastic. You could even offer custom bore cylinders and barrels, kinda like a thompson contender. Sell a high quality revolver and then sell cylinders and barrels for it for the next 10 years.

This is what I was thinking too. A modern day DA revolver in the vein of a Dan Wesson where virtually any part is user replaceable.

460Kodiak
March 20, 2013, 11:29 AM
I'd really love to see a new revolver and .41 magnum cartridge developed in a GP100, or S&W L frame sized revolver.

A six shot super hot roded 41 mag would be cool as hell.

6 shots, flat shooting and operate like the 460 magnum, where it will take 45 Schofield, Colt, 454, and 460. Co-develope with a major ammo maker. Lengthen the case. 180 gr slug at 2400 ft/sec would generate about 2300 ft lbs. Good for hunting, good for critter defense, down loaded, good for home defense, new land speed record for a handgun cartridge, all in a handy sized 6 shot revolver.

Dain Bramage
March 20, 2013, 12:49 PM
The lower receiver is the serialized "firearm" as far as the ATF is concerned. That gives the owner of the revolver the option of purchasing multiple monolithic upper receivers with different barrel lengths, handling characteristics, and sights. The sights stay with the barrel, so the owner does not need to sight-in or zero the revolver each time the barrel is changed. The word "monolithic" refers to the absence of a joint between the barrel and frame, or in this case, the upper receiver.


I see a lot of votes for break-tops here...


You could combine the concepts. Have multiple upper assemblies that remove at the break-top pivot. Probably wouldn't be much cheaper than buying new whole revolvers, though.

jhvaughan2
March 20, 2013, 01:01 PM
You could combine the concepts. Have multiple upper assemblies that remove at the break-top pivot. Probably wouldn't be much cheaper than buying new whole revolvers, though.

Kind of like my Valmet shotgun. The idea is you can swap the barrels for any caliber and combination of shotgun and rifle. The problem is the barrels cost more than a new shotgun or rifle. I guess it works if you only want to have one gun.

blueskyjaunte
March 20, 2013, 02:03 PM
Another vote for a modern, durable top-break design. As a lefty that loves wheelguns I am sadly most comfortable with SAA-style revolvers.

19-3Ben
March 20, 2013, 05:18 PM
I think that if you are looking for the revolver equivalent to the semi-custom 1911 makers (you mentioned Ed Brown and Wilson Combat), you'll have to do very high quality fighting guns, with some target guns thrown in the mix.

Revolvers don't really get a lot of attention when it comes to CQB type guns because everyone is so focused on 1911s and polymer high-cap pistols.

The most recent example of the type of guns I'm thinking we'd be discussing here is the Nightguard line from S&W. but expanded, and not all with lightweight wheelguns. Light weight makes them nice to carry, but I want a gun that shoots nicely!

My ideal fighting wheelgun in this scenario would be something like mid frame .357, with 3"bbl, with stainless steel frame, and melonite/tennifer type finish. From the factory it would come with melt job, trigger job, recessed crown, chamfered chambers, front dovetail sights set up with XS big dot or other as buyer specifies, and make it a 7 round cylinder (like the 686+).

I could have most of that work done to my Speed Six, but if there was a factory option...

That, to me, is the absolute ideal fighting wheel gun.

As for target variants, it seems like a lot of the custom shops cater to mostly the defensive practical competitions/carry/hd crowd. It's what's hot. Sure people will use a Wilson for bullseye shoots, but I'd bet (with nothing to back this up other than a gut feeling) that for every Wilson or Nighthawk used in bullseye, there are 3 or 4 being used in IPSC/IDPA or as EDC pistols.

Yoda
March 20, 2013, 05:24 PM
Top break. If cylinder length is an issue with regards to forcing cone/support hand geometry, then move the whole cylinder forward and make the frame and grip sweep back at a more shallow angle, like an old Webley Mk IV.

Here's an idea: Turn the underlug into a rifled .410 barrel. Even with zero barrel length, it would be good for snakes at close range... snakes that slither, and snakes that don't.

Calibers? Please, please, please, a .30 carbine revolver!

- - - Yoda

Yoda
March 20, 2013, 05:29 PM
Top break 9mm that will accept both 9x19 (Parabellum) and 9x17 (.380 ACP) on full moon clips.

Alternatively, a swing-out cylinder that can handle either round would also be good. It would help address ammo availability issues, and the .380 could be a good training alternative or carry alternative for someone with weak hands.

And with an ambidetxerous (however you spell it) release, so my daugher-in-law could/would use it, too!

- - - Yoda

19-3Ben
March 20, 2013, 05:40 PM
Here's an idea: Turn the underlug into a rifled .410 barrel. Even with zero barrel length, it would be good for snakes at close range... snakes that slither, and snakes that don't.


You mean like a LeMat?

Walkalong
March 20, 2013, 05:52 PM
I would like to see a high quality K frame size .32 Long revolver. Not likely to happen, but I wish.

CraigC
March 20, 2013, 06:00 PM
I would also love to see a revision of the Colt New Service and Shooting Master. Something like what we'd see if USFA started reproducing them. Made of modern heat treated steel, they would easily be strong enough for the .41Mag, .44Mag and "Ruger only" .45Colt. Fixed and adjustable sights and any barrel length from 2" to 7".

sidheshooter
March 20, 2013, 06:10 PM
My ideal fighting wheelgun in this scenario would be something like mid frame .357, with 3"bbl, with stainless steel frame, and melonite/tennifer type finish. From the factory it would come with melt job, trigger job, recessed crown, chamfered chambers, front dovetail sights set up with XS big dot or other as buyer specifies, and make it a 7 round cylinder (like the 686+).

I could have most of that work done to my Speed Six, but if there was a factory option...

That, to me, is the absolute ideal fighting wheel gun.



Have you seen this year's version of the Wiley Clapp GP? if you can do without the 7th shot...

http://www.camfour.com/camfourtest/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/720017533.png

Thompson9494
March 20, 2013, 06:15 PM
I'd like an eight-shot, break-top revolver with blued finish, black rubber grips and a four and half inch barrel, chambered in .38/.357.

savit260
March 20, 2013, 06:27 PM
Why do you think all the 9mm revolvers made to date have had essentially 38spl.-length cylinders that are quite a bit longer than they need to be.

most likely because they've all been built on existing .38 Special/ ,357 Magnum platforms.

The one exception to this that I can think of is the Taurus .380 revolver which used a short cylinder and short frame.


I don't see a big difference in OAL between the 9mm and the old S&W that used a shorter cylinder than a modern .38 Special.

9mm being 1.169" OAL and the old 38 S&W being 1.24" OAL.

Are people losing their fingers with the Taurus .380? Haven't heard any reports of that.

Jaymo
March 20, 2013, 06:29 PM
A 44 Spl Colt Python.
A J frame with a trigger pull like an L frame.
Any DA revolver without a lawyer DA trigger pull.

19-3Ben
March 20, 2013, 07:00 PM
Have you seen this year's version of the Wiley Clapp GP? if you can do without the 7th shot...

I have and it's one duuurn sexy gun for sure. The GP100 is a little bit "chunky monkey" for a 6 shot midframe wheelgun, which is why I mentioned the Speed Six, but yes, it's a really nice wheelgun.

OregonJohnny
March 20, 2013, 07:16 PM
Another vote for something sized between a NAA Mini Magnum and the S&W 351PD. The Mini Magnum is 5 rounds, the 351 is 7 rounds, so maybe a very narrow 6 round cylinder on a slightly smaller and shorter frame than Smith's J frame.

Chambered in .22 WMR, double action, internal hammer, nice smooth trigger, 2" barrel, dovetailed front and rear low-profile sights with a tritium front. Use titanium and scandium, or maybe even polymer, to keep the weight under 9 or 10 oz. Add a version with an external hammer, additional .22LR cylinder, and 3" barrel as a "kit gun".

RetiredUSNChief
March 20, 2013, 08:02 PM
This would be nice.

I wonder how this would work for interpretations on magazine limits...

:evil:

Jaymo
March 20, 2013, 08:05 PM
A revolver with no plastic, zinc, aluminum, or rubber, no MIM, and no investment castings.
I do have some wiggle room on the investment castings, but I'd prefer forged steel.

And no 30 page legal contract stamped on the barrel.

oneounceload
March 20, 2013, 08:25 PM
I would like to see a high quality K frame size .32 Long revolver. Not likely to happen, but I wish.

You mean like the K-32 Masterpiece?

Driftwood Johnson
March 20, 2013, 09:37 PM
Howdy

Interesting how so many are interested in Top Breaks.

I have a few.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/NewFrontSight02.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/My%20New%20Model%20Number%20Three/myNewModelNumberThree03.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/My%20New%20Model%20Number%20Three/unloading.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Russian/Russian.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/38SafetyHammerless3rdModel.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/32safetyhammerless2ndmodel.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/38DA3rdModel.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/38SA2ndModel01.jpg

Let me just say that contrary to popular belief, it is just as fast to empty and reload a modern swing out cylinder revolver as it is a Top Break. Yes, ejection is automatic with the Top Break, but with practice, one can develop the technique to pop the cylinder out and depress the ejector rod of a modern cylinder just as fast as the Top Breaks do it. It just takes a little bit of practice. There is no significant difference to how fast I can empty my New Model Number Three or my Russian than how fast I can empty and reload any Hand Ejector.

Second, none of the old Top Breaks are as strong as a modern side swing revolver. The only exception is the Webley, and that is because the Webley has a really massive latch and a very strong spring. The old S&W Top Breaks are not that strong. That's why they were never chambered for any high powered cartridges such as 357 Mag or 44 Mag. The modern replicas made by Uberti are only chambered for 45 Colt, 44-40, 44 Russian and 38 Special. No magnums. There is a reason for that, they are not strong enough. I have seen high speed film of an old ASM Schofield being shot, and it is scary. You can actually see the frame flexing with the shot.

So if somebody is going to make you guys your dream Top Break, there is going to have to be some serious work done redesigning the latch.

Bassleg
March 21, 2013, 01:01 AM
A 44 Spl SP101 5 shot 3" barrel I have a Charter Arms bulldog but it's one to carry a lot and shoot little and I would like to shoot mine a lot.

Colt451985
March 21, 2013, 01:22 AM
Crazy, but interesting idea:

A sealed barrel to cylinder gap mechanism to allow for the attachment of sound suppressors. The down side to this idea would be the complexity of the mechanism.

Imagine a suppressed .44 Magnum :)

Colt451985
March 21, 2013, 01:24 AM
A top break design is interesting, but I would have to be convinced that there is a large enough market for a new top break design to risk investing the capital in R&D.

Lost Sheep
March 21, 2013, 01:35 AM
Something like the Dan Wesson revolvers but with interchangable cylinders and barrels. 1 revolver that you could have a 45c, 44 spec., or 38 spec. cylinders and barrels for in different lengths. I'd be happy with that. Forget the plastic. You could even offer custom bore cylinders and barrels, kinda like a thompson contender. Sell a high quality revolver and then sell cylinders and barrels for it for the next 10 years.
There is a fellow in Alaska with a WessonHawk (Redhawk/Dan Wesson hybrid) with both 45 Colt and 44 Magnum cylinders (better not get the wrong barrel with that combination!).

Lost Sheep

p.s. http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/showthread.php/88131-Dual-Caliber-Wesson-Hawk?highlight=Wesson+Redhawk

Colt451985
March 21, 2013, 01:53 AM
Additional ideas for my lower receiver/monolithic upper receiver design:

For the lower receiver, copy the Smith & Wesson L-Frame round butt grip to take advantage of the large aftermarket of grips.

For the monolithic upper receiver, provide options for Novak-cut rear sight, Novak-cut front sight, Smith & Wesson adjustable rear sight, and Smith & Wesson DX interchangeable front sight.

Lost Sheep
March 21, 2013, 02:15 AM
The post-style frame inside the grip allows great freedom for custom-shaping the grip to one's hand. For those of us without woodworking skills, how about a small blank inletted for the post of the Ruger GP/SRH and SP models with a moldable outer shell.

It could be a clay-like resin/hardener material or a heat-workable material.

Lost Sheep

slickracer
March 21, 2013, 06:30 AM
Perfection was acheived in 1935 by Smith & Wesson with the Registered Magnum, now known as the Model 27. No further efforts necessary :).

To be serious I would like to see a S&W 617 with a half lug barrel.

IlikeSA
March 21, 2013, 07:50 AM
How about an "upper" and "lower." The catch is strength of frame, but top break where the cylinder, hinge, and barrel come off and are replaced by a new cylinder, barrel and top strap, which then snaps into place. Furthermore, do the Dan Wesson thing where the barrels also pop off: perhaps something like a Hornady Lock n Load die bushing for the barrel?

BCRider
March 21, 2013, 01:23 PM
A revolver with no plastic, zinc, aluminum, or rubber, no MIM, and no investment castings.
I do have some wiggle room on the investment castings, but I'd prefer forged steel.


That would be nice. But the reality is that with revolvers playing second fiddle to semis in terms of numbers sold in the market we'd also be looking at lofty prices for all this forging stull given the production numbers. Are we willing to pay the Freedom Arms like prices that such quality would cost these days?

For my own part having worked with a top break I find that it takes two hands used on the gun for a greater degree of time than with the currently popular side opening setup. So really as an aid to faster loading I'd suggest that the side opening style is going to win during a reloading race. Maybe not by a lot but it's still a factor to consider.

Me? I'd like to see a further development on the low chamber firing as seen in the Chiappa Rhino. But this time with a less complicated action design and MUCH nicer feel to the trigger. The current Rhino design has a lot going for it. But the trigger feels simply terrible in too many ways to list.

Colt451985
March 21, 2013, 08:31 PM
The Chiappa Rhino is interesting. The cosmetic appearance might be "too different" for a lot of people. Personally, while an interesting design, I think it looks ugly.

Irtys
March 21, 2013, 11:03 PM
How about a single action revolver that loads like a double action? :)

beatledog7
March 21, 2013, 11:12 PM
If this already exists, I apologize for not knowing: how about a 6 or 7-shot .223 Remington revolver, where the rounds headspace on the shoulder so there's no need for any sort of moonclip. It would have to be heavy to aid in controlling recoil and handle the pressure, theoretically, but handloaders could soft load rounds (taking advantage of the short barrel) and still avoid squibs. That would be a marvelous HD gun and a huge amount of range fun.

silvermane_1
March 21, 2013, 11:18 PM
taurus already made a raging .223.

19-3Ben
March 21, 2013, 11:20 PM
If this already exists, I apologize for not knowing: how about a 6 or 7-shot .223 Remington revolver, where the rounds headspace on the shoulder so there's no need for any sort of moonclip. It would have to be heavy to aid in controlling recoil and handle the pressure, theoretically, but handloaders could soft load rounds (taking advantage of the short barrel) and still avoid squibs. That would be a marvelous HD gun and a huge amount of range fun.

There have been revolvers chambered in bottleneck rifle rounds before. They seem to have extraction problems for whatever reason. I think I remember RCmodel explaining it very well one time. I'm just too much of a dunce to remember.

PlaneJain
March 21, 2013, 11:32 PM
A S&W double action (N) frame 475 linebaugh with a 4 inch barrel, that kicks like a 686 at most! lol :D

.22-5-40
March 21, 2013, 11:37 PM
Interesting interest in top breaks. So here is an idea..what about a modernized Webly-Fosbery..stainless and/or titanium. 9mm, 357 Sig..on up..maybe even a .22 rimfire for grins!

Colt451985
March 22, 2013, 12:38 AM
As a LH, I would like to see an ambidextrous revolver- think like the semi HK P7 - with cylinder that could open either way for RH or LH shooters with the release in the same vein. It should have swappable barrels so you could lengthen or shorten - think Dan Wesson - and swappable cylinders - think Ruger, in centerfire rounds like 38, 9mm, 40, 45ACP, etc.......

With a Ruger button-style release on both sides of the upper receiver, I can see having a left-handed crane that swings the cylinder to the right and a right-handed crane that swings the cylinder to the left. A Smith & Wesson slide-style release on both sides of the upper receiver would be difficult. Some compromises would have to be made to make this work. The ejector shroud would have to be open on the left and right sides to allow the cylinder to swing in either direction. Likewise, the upper receiver where the crane sits in the closed position would have to be open on the left and right sides to allow the cylinder to swing in either direction, which would weaken the upper receiver.

I'm not sure this can be done, but the idea is interesting. I'll continue to play around with the idea and see if I can find a creative solution. However, another idea would be to have a left-handed upper receiver and right-handed upper receiver rather than an ambidextrous upper receiver. To decrease the number of parts necessary, I could probably make the lower receiver work with either the left-handed or right-handed upper receiver.

Lost Sheep
March 22, 2013, 12:58 AM
If this already exists, I apologize for not knowing: how about a 6 or 7-shot .223 Remington revolver, where the rounds headspace on the shoulder so there's no need for any sort of moonclip. It would have to be heavy to aid in controlling recoil and handle the pressure, theoretically, but handloaders could soft load rounds (taking advantage of the short barrel) and still avoid squibs. That would be a marvelous HD gun and a huge amount of range fun.
The moonclip is more for ejection than for headspacing.

Lost Sheep

Dnaltrop
March 22, 2013, 01:33 PM
Love the idea of Top breaks, but no clue how many people would buy one other than those of us who already scratch that particular itch with existing replicas/antiques.

In that same "cool" range (though I'm obviously crazy) I'd love a modern "Volcanic" lever action pistol, worked to handle .380/9mm/.45 ACP instead of the traditional Rocket balls.

+1 for the modern LeMat, and for those of us who've not yet read Correa's Grimnoir books.... He created a fictional Lemat-Schofield chambered in .50 + 12 gauge. That one sounds "fun" even if brought down to more reasonable calibers.

Jim Watson
March 22, 2013, 02:20 PM
In other words, the "Ed Brown" or "Wilson Combat" of revolvers

Consider that Ed and Bill are doing well selling nicely made examples OF A COMMON AND POPULAR DESIGN, not a niche product of odd concept.

Therefore the Wilson Combat of revolvers would be something like a very refined K Smith.

There is a lot of claimed interest in a modern topbreak. I don't know if you can build a topbreak to handle high end smokeless loads. A good first developmental step would be to take a .38 Webley or Enfield and make new cylinder and top latch out of the very best steel, chamber in 9mm, and shoot it a lot for durability testing.

Jan Stevenson said that if you put a bull barrel and hand filling grips on a French Mle 1892, it would be as modern a revolver as anything. Again, a heat treated cylinder to allow chambering in 9mm Whatever with clips. He favored the 9x25 Mauser Export, but these days, one would go with the 9x23 Win.

Oh, yeah, Dnaltrop, there is somewhere on the www an account of a shop made Volcanic pistol set up with an extractor for cartridges. So as to not change the overall proportions of the gun, he made it for a shortened .40 case. Not real hot, but more powerful than a Rocket Ball.

CraigC
March 22, 2013, 04:59 PM
Consider that Ed and Bill are doing well selling nicely made examples OF A COMMON AND POPULAR DESIGN, not a niche product of odd concept.
And every reputable revolversmith in the country is sporting a 1-2yr backlog on full custom jobs. Some even longer. 1911's are really fairly limited. Custom revolvers have far more possibilities. Apparently there's room for everybody.

railroadman
March 22, 2013, 05:23 PM
let,s make a Ruger Old Army in 36 as well as .457 dia.They would selll like hot cakes.try to find one for under $450.00

beatledog7
March 22, 2013, 05:57 PM
Yeah, I can see why ejection would be a challenge. But as CAPT Kirk said to the changeling on Rura Penthe, "There's gotta be a way."

CraigC
March 22, 2013, 06:14 PM
They would sell like hot cakes.
They were discontinued because they did NOT sell like hot cakes.

GrayGore
March 23, 2013, 01:44 AM
I would like to see interchangeable barrels that latch in via a quick twist similar to the setup on some reloading dies. Or maybe more like SLR camera lenses where you press a release button and twist.

Driftwood Johnson
March 23, 2013, 09:45 AM
How about a large frame revolver with a cylinder that swings out and locks up in three places? Oh wait, that's already been done.

Frankly, I too think that the height of perfection in revolvers was reached in the 1930s and nothing further needs to be done. At least I won't be buying one.

CraigC
March 23, 2013, 11:29 AM
The reason we don't see any top breaks is because they are not only expensive to build and require hand-fitting, not enough people would buy them. How many asking for a new top break already have Schofield and #3 Russian replicas? Anybody???


Frankly, I too think that the height of perfection in revolvers was reached in the 1930s and nothing further needs to be done. At least I won't be buying one.
Agreed. Unfortunately, the best "advances" in revolvers are decades old. To "advance" from where we are now will require going back in time.

Gaucho Gringo
March 23, 2013, 02:10 PM
A new top break revolver. The reason the new ones like the copies of 3rd & Russian models don't sell is they are pieces of crap and everyone knows it. They aren't very dependable new and people have a lot of problems with them. OTOH my little 32 top break is over 100 yeas old and functions perfectly.

CraigC
March 23, 2013, 02:36 PM
...they are pieces of crap and everyone knows it.
Yes, I'm sure. S&W didn't exactly light the world on fire with their reissue either. It must've been crap too. :rolleyes:

Vern Humphrey
March 23, 2013, 05:01 PM
What I'd like to see is a revolver built on the Dan Wesson system, so you could interchange barrels. I'd also like interchangeable cylinders.

My ideal revolver would be a properly-throated .45 Colt, with cylinders long enough to handle heavy bullets loaded well out, and with the back of the cylinder relieved to allow the use of .45 ACP with half moon clips.

The same revolver could be switched to .44 Mag, .357 Mag, or what have you by switching cylinders and barrels.

Driftwood Johnson
March 24, 2013, 02:30 AM
The reason the new ones like the copies of 3rd & Russian models don't sell is they are pieces of crap and everyone knows it. They aren't very dependable new and people have a lot of problems with them. OTOH my little 32 top break is over 100 yeas old and functions perfectly.

Whoa!!

I have originals too, about a half dozen of them. Yes, they are fine examples of craftsmanship.

But you are dead wrong when you say the current replicas of Top Breaks made by Uberti are crap. Yes, the Schofields made by ASM were poorly made and had lots of problems, but those are not the same as the current crop from Uberti. I have fired a few and they are fine. They compare very favorably with my originals.

Yes, Uberti messed with the gas collars on them so they do not perform well with Black Powder but that does not make them crap. They shoot just fine with Smokeless. They are very well made.

The 2000 series Schofields made by S&W were beautifully made too. They were a limited edition, and they completely sold out. When they show up on the gun auction sites they go for big dollars. Again, S&W messed with the gas collar so they do not perform well with Black Powder, but they perform fine with Smokeless.

There really just is not much of a demand out there for Top Breaks. That's why there are not very many made. Other than Cowboy Action shooters, who comprise a pretty small portion of the market, there are not very many shooters who are interested in owning one.

Far more are interested in novelty guns like the Judge.

skoro
March 24, 2013, 08:19 AM
I'd just like to see more DA options in 22wmr.

Orion8472
March 24, 2013, 10:46 AM
I'm going to "ditto" the top break 9mm style, with the Charter Arms type retention, . . . 6 rounds, I guess.

I'd also love to have an [at least] 8 shot 22lr break top.

Pointshoot
March 24, 2013, 10:52 AM
A gun like those you see in the movies. One that never runs out of ammo.

Jaymo
March 24, 2013, 09:36 PM
I want that burp gun that Charlize Theron used in Aeon Flux. It never ran out of ammo.

Clark
March 24, 2013, 10:25 PM
I want a tiny 45acp revolver that fits in my shirt pocket.

TSH77769
March 24, 2013, 11:42 PM
Ruger GP 100 5 shot .44 mag with cylinder length same as Super Redhawk

Ruger Super Redhawk 8 or 9 shot .357

Lightweight rugers using Aluminum, Scandium, Titanium, and Polymer.

Something like the LCR but full sized and with better sights.

S&W N Frame 9 shot .327 Federal

Break top DA revolvers

Chiappa/Mateba style bottom chamber firing but striker fired

S&W 547 or Charter arms style no moon clip needed extraction/ejection systems for pistol cartridge chambered revolvers.

Lightweight S&W 617

Some sort of gas seal mechanism allowing for suppression (yes I know about the Nagant) with standard pre-existing cartrdiges.

As an alternative to a breaktop, some sort of pull the barrel and cylinder forward from the grip/FCG auto extraction system (I've seen it done on some ancient revovlers).

tsh77769

Mango88
March 24, 2013, 11:44 PM
I would like to see interchangeable barrels that latch in via a quick twist similar to the setup on some reloading dies. Or maybe more like SLR camera lenses where you press a release button and twist.

A Merwin Hulburt type action could perhaps achieve this and perhaps the frame could be made to accommodate different caliber cylinders and barrels. A sort of multi-caliber pistol pack.

41wheelgun
March 24, 2013, 11:56 PM
I would like to see Colt just bring back their DA revolvers such as the Detective, King Cobra and Annaconda, espiecially cambered in .41 rem mag.

KenW.
March 25, 2013, 12:33 AM
Striker-fired with a polymer frame. Works well in semi-autos. Add a grip you can customize like the new Glocks and the XDM. And why not a light rail?:scrutiny:

BCRider
March 25, 2013, 02:06 AM
I'd also love to have an [at least] 8 shot 22lr break top.

Then you need to shop around for a Harrington & Richardson Sportman model 999. 9 shot top break DA/SA revolver. Best of all the one I have is decently accurate. Not S&W model 17 accurate but a nice plinker.

Orion8472
March 25, 2013, 09:20 AM
Thanks for the suggestion, BCRider. :)

blueskyjaunte
March 25, 2013, 01:13 PM
To all the top-break naysayers: when I proposed a top-break I was NOT referring to a Schofield replica or similar.

I'm talking about a MODERN revolver, chambered in a MODERN cartridge, that features the ambidextrous ease-of-ejection and -reload of a top-break. With modern materials, heat treatment technology, and machining I see no reason an 8-round .357 Magnum top break would be unmanageable. Yes, it would require some major rethinking in terms of design and engineering. And it may end up being as ugly as the Chiappa Rhino. ;) :D But IMHO it can be done.

CraigC
March 25, 2013, 01:52 PM
...when I proposed a top-break I was NOT referring to a Schofield replica or similar.
We know that but the point remains. Top-breaks have never been huge sellers. If they offered some huge advantage over even Colt-style single actions, they would be more popular. Is a "modern" design really going to offer anything not served by existing DA's?

You guys talk about "modern machining" as if it results in guns better fitted than 100yrs ago. The best guns in the world are still hand made and hand-fitted, not machined and slapped together.

Screwball
March 25, 2013, 02:02 PM
9mm J-frame, which I don't need moonclips for...

Since I carry a 9mm on duty, it would be nice to have a revolver I could just toss in ammo from a spare magazine.

blueskyjaunte
March 25, 2013, 03:21 PM
You guys talk about "modern machining" as if it results in guns better fitted than 100yrs ago. The best guns in the world are still hand made and hand-fitted, not machined and slapped together.

The best guns in the world are still hand fitted. Yes, I agree 100%.

However, the tolerances achievable with modern machining (EDM, CNC, etc) means that larger volumes can be produced with less hand-fitting required to get to something that works. With a "dream" shop you can get much closer to the finished product faster than you can without one. This also means you can get feedback on design/engineering changes faster.

Lost Sheep
March 26, 2013, 01:35 AM
9mm J-frame, which I don't need moonclips for...

Since I carry a 9mm on duty, it would be nice to have a revolver I could just toss in ammo from a spare magazine.
Ruger made one on the Service-Six platform. Medusa makes one (still, I think).

Lost Sheep

Scrumbag
March 26, 2013, 03:57 AM
For me it would be a decent .357 Mountain gun.

Lightweight, strouded ejector rather than underlugged barrel in a K frame size

Interchangeable cylinders for 357/38 and 9mm (9mm cylinder having rimless type star and / or cut for moon clips).

savit260
March 26, 2013, 11:37 AM
For me it would be a decent .357 Mountain gun.

Lightweight, strouded ejector rather than underlugged barrel in a K frame size

Isn't that called a Model 19?

Scrumbag
March 26, 2013, 03:24 PM
Savit, you're kinda right but it is a bit fragile with .357 Mags and doesn't have the other cylinder...

CraigC
March 26, 2013, 04:00 PM
For me it would be a decent .357 Mountain gun.
They did do a 686 Mountain Gun but not a convertible. Although a convertible is really unnecessary with a double action, all you need is to cut it for moon clips.

blue32
March 27, 2013, 12:50 AM
I wish a company would offer a made to order revolver. You pick the frame size, material, caliber, features, finish, etc. Everything is a la carte.

ex.: J frame, steel, blued, 6 shot, 327 fed mag, 3" bbl, notch rear, gold bead front, full underlug, wood boot grip, etc.

KenW.
March 27, 2013, 09:32 AM
I wish a company would offer a made to order revolver. You pick the frame size, material, caliber, features, finish, etc. Everything is a la carte.

Kind of like the "Build A Bear" teddy bear place in the mall?

savit260
March 27, 2013, 11:43 AM
I wish a company would offer a made to order revolver. You pick the frame size, material, caliber, features, finish, etc. Everything is a la carte.

ex.: J frame, steel, blued, 6 shot, 327 fed mag, 3" bbl, notch rear, gold bead front, full underlug, wood boot grip, etc.

There are gunsmiths that will do just that, but your pockets will need to be deeper than for an off the shelf piece.

KenW.
March 27, 2013, 11:45 AM
J frame, steel, blued, 6 shot,

A 6-shot J-Frame? Sacrilage! Repent, I say!

AKMtnRunner
March 27, 2013, 12:16 PM
A sleeve operated by the trigger/hammer to close the cylinder gap

Madcap_Magician
March 27, 2013, 12:58 PM
Isn't the problem with a modern topbreak the durability of the lock mechanism when under pressure from calibers bigger than .38 Special or so?

I would be satisfied to see production of 3" J- and K-frames and the return of Colt DA revolvers.

DWFan
March 28, 2013, 02:00 AM
Not exactly a new design, but reintroduce the Taurus .500 S&W Magnum revolver chambered as a 7-round .357 Maximum (they had the still-born 7-round .223) and a 6-round .445 SuperMag. While they're at it, incorporate the barrel/shroud system of the Dan Wesson.
Oh, and bring back the M607 but with an 8" barrel and chambered for the .360 Dan Wesson.

HoosierQ
March 28, 2013, 02:33 PM
I'd like to see a 7 round, 3", 9mm with full moon clips.

I'd like to see a 5" bbl and just about anything.

3", 4", 5", and 6" on revolvers would just be great...instead of just 4 or 6.

mountainsco
March 28, 2013, 07:47 PM
Crazy, but interesting idea:

A sealed barrel to cylinder gap mechanism to allow for the attachment of sound suppressors. The down side to this idea would be the complexity of the mechanism.

Imagine a suppressed .44 Magnum

This would be fantastic as it would let them build a .44 magnum revolver rifle, something I've pondered for some time. I have a lever action .44, but it's not the same.

NewShooter
March 28, 2013, 08:26 PM
Public Defender shortened to accept 45colt only.

DWFan
March 29, 2013, 12:40 AM
Here ya go mountainsco:
Rossi .44 Magnum Ciucuit Judge...
http://www.rossiusa.com/product-details.cfm?id=221&category=15&toggle=&breadcrumbseries=

RevolvingGarbage
March 29, 2013, 08:03 AM
I don't buy into the idea that a topbreak can't handle modern higher pressure cartridges. The Russians designed one to fire .357 mag, and had a polymer frame!

I think a modern version of the classic Iver Johnson Safety hammerless in stainless, and chambered for 9x19 would sell. Give it nightsights, a 2" barrel, and a comfy set of grips, and you might have the best carry revolver ever.

hAkron
March 29, 2013, 09:30 AM
How about a top break with a latch that is user replaceable? If that's the area where they wear out / beat themselves to death, why not recognize that and solve it by making it a field replaceable part? Like extractors and recoil springs in a semi-auto?

mountainsco
March 29, 2013, 09:34 AM
Here ya go mountainsco:
Rossi .44 Magnum Ciucuit Judge...
http://www.rossiusa.com/product-deta...adcrumbseries=

Well look at that. How long has this been out? Looks like a pretty decent ranch rifle. Thanks!

Vern Humphrey
March 29, 2013, 10:50 AM
A sleeve operated by the trigger/hammer to close the cylinder gap
It exists -- the Nagant revolver. There are no real advantages to the design, which is why you don't see new ones coming out today.

Driftwood Johnson
March 29, 2013, 09:11 PM
How about a top break with a latch that is user replaceable? If that's the area where they wear out / beat themselves to death, why not recognize that and solve it by making it a field replaceable part? Like extractors and recoil springs in a semi-auto?

Howdy

If only it were that simple. Generally speaking, when a Top Break got loose it was not because the latch was worn. Usually, either the frame was stretched, or the frame was worn. Replacing the latch would accomplish nothing.

Here is a photo of the latch area on my S&W DA44. When I bought it, the lockup was a bit loose. With the latch in place, I could rock the barrel down slightly, causing a gap of a few thousandths to appear where the arrow points. This is the spot where the top strap snugs down onto the main frame.

This gun was made in 1881. The steel is not modern steel, it does not have the strength of modern steels. What is very typical with these old guns is that somebody decides to shoot some Smokeless cartridges in them. If the cartridges are too powerful for the old steel, the frame will get battered and will stretch. That is what was wrong with this one, The frame had stretched, just a tiny amount, but it was enough that when the latch was closed, it did not make contact with the frame posts until the barrel was tilted down a degree or so.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Model%20Threes/44DArearsightwitharrow_zps69bd6fe7.jpg



I know a very talented gunsmith, who is very familiar with the old Top Breaks. I felt pretty sure that he could tighten up the lockup for me, so I went ahead and bought the gun. I thought he was going to weld a spot of metal onto the frame posts and file it down to make the proper fit. What he did instead was he drilled two holes in the frame posts, drove in a pair of conical dowel pins, then cut them and filed them so they presented a slightly raised surface for the latch to mate to.

Here is a photo of what he did. The rear surfaces of the dowel pins are raised just a few thousandths above the adjacent surfaces of the posts. It is just enough so that the latch now snaps down securely over the posts and there is no longer any play at the latch.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Model%20Threes/44DAlatchlockuprepair_zpsc3beca44.jpg


Now I'm sure some of you fellows are going to say that with modern steel this would not have happened. And perhaps you are correct. But my point is, correcting a loose latch such as this is not a question of replacing a part. Metal has to be added to the joint, and then the metal has to be filed down just right to get the fit right. Not a case of slapping in a replacement part, this is a job for a highly skilled gunsmith.

It is a weak point of the design, the frame can stretch. That is why all the major revolver companies stopped making Top Breaks and switched over to solid frame revolvers with swing out cylinders. A solid frame is going to always be stronger than a jointed Top Break.

BigShep85
March 30, 2013, 10:06 PM
Double action cowboy gun, like the vaqueros but in double and single action

Vern Humphrey
March 30, 2013, 10:08 PM
Double action cowboy gun, like the vaqueros but in double and single action
It was called the High Standard Double Nine -- in .22 only.

Coop45
March 30, 2013, 10:10 PM
My name on the patent?

SullyVols
March 31, 2013, 05:27 PM
A barrel that was installed so the sight is at 12 o'clock. A couple of the Rugers and over half the S&Ws I've checked in the past couple months have canted barrels.

The dan wesson revolvers seem pretty easy to work with. You could easily fix a misaligned barrel and set the cylinder gap yourself. You could also have a 8" or 6" barrel for target practice and hunting - then a 2.5" or 3" barrel for personal defense. More than anything else I'd like S&W to do this. They could sell a gun with a given barrel then charge more for the tool and extra barrels (Everyone wins and Smith can pocket the extra cash)

Vern Humphrey
March 31, 2013, 05:33 PM
I agree -- the Dan Wesson interchangeable barrels with shrouds solve a lot of problems like canted frolnt sights.

Now if they only had interchangeable cylinders as well -- so with one revolver you could shoot .22 LR, .357, .44 Mag, .45 Colt and so on.

Capstick1
March 31, 2013, 05:41 PM
I'd like to see Smith and Wesson start making the model 610 revolver again. You just can't find these 10mm revolvers anymore. I've looked in the pawnshops and the gunshop used gun sections and you can't find them anywhere.

Jaymo
March 31, 2013, 09:59 PM
My name on the patent, AND the paycheck.


The only 610 I ever shot was very nice.

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