Tx Feral Pig Population To Double


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The_Shootist
March 19, 2013, 05:17 PM
We need to double the population of hunters! :D

http://blog.chron.com/sciguy/2013/03/scientists-even-with-current-harvest-feral-pig-population-will-double/

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taliv
March 19, 2013, 05:28 PM
that's a lot of pork

i'm going to try to do my part later this year

Patocazador
March 19, 2013, 05:30 PM
With the size of the litters and the fecundity of sows, I'm surprised the population isn't tripling every year.

kyletx1911
March 19, 2013, 05:31 PM
it wouldnt be so bad but talking to some ranchers, they want to rid themselves of the hogs.
But they want to charge us 50-100$ a hunt

JRH6856
March 19, 2013, 06:19 PM
it wouldnt be so bad but talking to some ranchers, they want to rid themselves of the hogs.
But they want to charge us 50-100$ a hunt
Many landowners prefer to trap hogs as unlike dead meat which is considered wild game, live hogs can be sold for slaughter whether raised in a pin or trapped and sold as free range. For those who don't want to do the trapping themselves, there are trappers who will do the trapping and either share the profits with the the owner or pay for trapping rights. Money is money, and it doesn't always make sense to allow free hunting.

kyletx1911
March 19, 2013, 06:30 PM
^^^^point

fdf
March 19, 2013, 06:53 PM
Many landowners prefer to trap hogs as unlike dead meat which is considered wold game, live hogs can be sold for slaughter whether raised in a pin or trapped and sold as free range. For those who don't want to do the trapping themselves, there are trappers who will do the trapping and either share the profits with the the owner or pay for trapping rights. Money is money, and it doesn't always make sense to allow free hunting.
__________________

Not aimed at one particular person in mind, just thoughts.

I know my trapper, he is my neighbor, he closes my gates, watches my cows and calls me if needed. I do not know you or anyone wanting to hunt. Why let you come onto my property? Do you have insurance so I am not sued by you or your friends?

I am there year round and know where the hogs could be. Do you? Hogs move a lot and are easily run off.

You want to show up on Friday and leave on Sunday, ride your 4-wheeler and make lots of noise while you run the hogs off my property. What did I gain?

I spent the better part of a Saturday picking up beer cans from the public road in from of my place, all thrown out since the start of deer season.

The local land owners see hunters in the feed store, grocery store, gas station and we see and listen, for the most part, folks who want to hunt turn off land owners by your actions in town.

I could lease, but in reality, it's more problems than it's worth.

kyletx1911
March 19, 2013, 06:58 PM
for myself, and the guys i hunt with keep our hunt clean, we shoot, clean and bury.
my point was that the ranchers are asking for help.

fdf
March 19, 2013, 07:07 PM
Your group is rare.

I have folks pull up dressed in full camo and for the most part, look like and act like Larry the Cable Guy and ask can we hunt?

If I was going to lease it would be to a man, with a wife and a child and no guests.

Nope to all others.

Ranchers need help, problem is we are on the land all the time and know what is there and then hunters want to arrive and proceed to tell us how they are going to rid us of our problem.

I hunted one hog for a month, I had him on camera, he arrived each night 30 minutes after dark.

It finally started raining hard about an hour before dark and rained all night. I knew I had him at that point, next morning he showed up after the rain stopped. We used the front end loader to pick him up.

Part time hunters could not have killed the hog. He was trap shy and would not enter a trap near by.

Certaindeaf
March 19, 2013, 09:28 PM
I think you spelled ovulation wrong.

double bogey
March 19, 2013, 10:54 PM
They are everywhere. I was riding on a mountain bike trail (L.B. Houston) in Dallas last friday. About a mile in I started to notice small tracks that I thought were deer, but then saw the adult hog tracks, and the ground around the oak trees was rooted. This was on the east side of the Trinity river, abour a quarter mile east of Williams Square (the blgs with the mustang sculptues), in the heart of Las Colinas.

Texan Scott
March 20, 2013, 02:07 AM
I first read the title as "TX Feral Pig Copulation to Double"; then I realized he meant "Population"; then I realized it's more or less the same thing either way... :p

Teh interwebs, they has ruined me. :banghead:

Anyone near Kerr/ Bandera/ Comal wanna host a hog hunt? I'll be there!

alsaqr
March 20, 2013, 01:34 PM
i sincerely doubt the hogs in drought stricken areas of TX will double in population so long as this drought continues. In 2011 and 1012 i saw dozens of small pigs that had starved to death on both sides of the Red River in TX and OK.

No farmer/rancher here: Mine is all hunting property. Strange thing, the farmers and ranchers near our properties can't understand why i refuse to allow wheat or cattle on the place.

JRH6856
March 20, 2013, 03:53 PM
Strange thing, the farmers and ranchers near our properties can't understand why i refuse to allow wheat or cattle on the place.

You might tell them that cattle are just too easy to shoot and hunting them is no fun.

adelbridge
March 20, 2013, 04:23 PM
I am an avid hog hunter and hunt a handful of outfitters that charge $100-$150 very often.
I have seen one outfitter trap hogs on other properties and move them to his lease. If he can run 10 hunters per week at $150 per head he is doing all he can to keep the hog population growing. He is not alone. If hunters didnt pay the "problem" wouldnt exist. Texas is a huge hunting state and Texas Parks and Wildlife knows what is going on but their charter is to cater to hunters. I run a corn feeder all year and so does a good percentage of the population down here. It concentrates the hogs and encourages the breeding not to mention they probably quadruple the per acre carrying capacity.

alsaqr
March 20, 2013, 05:33 PM
If hunters didnt pay the "problem" wouldnt exist.

Bingo!!
Trapping and selling wild hogs to "hunting ranches" is big business in TX and OK. The only thing that could stop the sale of feral hogs is an outbreak of hoof and mouth disease. Here in OK the owners of the "hunting ranches" buy hogs at the livestock auction. Some of the hogs i trap and kill look like show pigs.

All of the hogs i catch die right in the traps. Because of our trapping hogs are getting scarce at one of our properties and dwindling at another one.

We run deer feeders much of the year. Yesterday i put an 18" high hog fence around one of those feeders. Some friends did that at their lease. They no longer have a problem with hogs at their deer feeders.

josiewales
March 22, 2013, 05:59 PM
Anybody in Texas want me to come down and help shoot pigs this year? I be more than willing.

Ms_Dragon
March 22, 2013, 08:31 PM
The trouble is regardless of the pig population explosion, farmers have learned the hard way that hunting permission gets abused.
Allow a hunter on your land once and they take it as a green light to invite every yokel they know along as well.
They leave garbage and broken bottles everywhere, cut fences, shoot livestock because they are too drunk to tell the difference.

They've ruined the good will and trust that decent hunters have tried to build.

It's a shame.

Twmaster
March 22, 2013, 10:04 PM
And then those of us who are responsible get the cold shoulder. Perfectly understandable. Too many selfish yahoos ruining it for everyone. Including themselves.

I do not blame land owners one bit for their stance of not allowing unknown persons on their land to hunt.

splattergun
March 22, 2013, 10:06 PM
A lot of us are ready and willing to help with that Texas Rat problem, but y'all make it too difficult.

Bobson
March 22, 2013, 10:30 PM
A small army of state and federal employees has been trained to stalk, trap and kill feral pigs. . .
How do you get that job? And they train you too? :eek:

Certaindeaf
March 22, 2013, 10:40 PM
We've got a problem with English Ivy up here. Come on up and knock yourself out pulling it out. If you bonk your head, you're on your own and if you litter etc, you might get bonked on the head.

nathan
March 23, 2013, 02:04 AM
Anyone want s to kill hogs in Texas , contact the TPW. They may need shooters to cull them hogs . You get access to plenty of state owned lands and gets paid doing it.

HB
March 23, 2013, 06:33 AM
I wonder if baiting deer has anything to do with it...

HB

alsaqr
March 23, 2013, 08:39 AM
I wonder if baiting deer has anything to do with it...

From personal experience: Baiting deer has contributed greatly to the hog population explosion. Theres been a small population of wild hogs in the area of one property for decades. Never saw a hog there until we started running deer feeders.

JRH6856
March 23, 2013, 12:46 PM
I wonder if baiting deer has anything to do with it...

Well, deer and hogs eat pretty much the same thing. And if you put up a sign that says "For Deer Only", hogs can't read. (Except for Arnold on Green Acres).

HB
March 24, 2013, 05:28 PM
That was my assumption. Most of the hogs in Missouri are here because "outfitters" released them for clients to hunt and they escaped or were released on public land illegally to start with. Just my opinion without much science involved but I believe "hunters" are by and large responsible for our nation's hog ills. Its not like they just swam over from Europe in the past 20 years.

HB

Art Eatman
March 24, 2013, 07:39 PM
Aw, I dunno, HB. Hogs have been imported into the US since way back in the sailing-ship days.

Used to be, what we now call feral hogs were relatively-free-ranging, but were a meat source for both owners and the markets. Remember, prior to WW II, almost half the workforce was on-farm. Now, under three percent of the workforce. Far fewer people "working the land" on a daily basis.

Times changed. Now we have pork factories and egg factories and so forth. Free-ranging hogs pretty much stayed free-ranging. And, as been noted, they have two or three litters per year and several piglets per litter.

Sure, some number of hunters may have introduced the ferals into new areas, but they expand into new territory on their own.

Patocazador
March 24, 2013, 10:55 PM
The hogs around here were originally introduced by DeSoto in the 1500s.

nathan
March 24, 2013, 11:18 PM
Texas hogs breed and proliferate , maybe because of the many food and water sources . These hogs thrive in just about anything . Very resilient animal .

MCgunner
March 25, 2013, 09:21 PM
I'm a small land owner who loves his pork, so BRING IT ON, BABY! More pigs the merrier. :D

Many landowners prefer to trap hogs as unlike dead meat which is considered wild game, live hogs can be sold for slaughter whether raised in a pin or trapped and sold as free range. For those who don't want to do the trapping themselves, there are trappers who will do the trapping and either share the profits with the the owner or pay for trapping rights. Money is money, and it doesn't always make sense to allow free hunting.

I looked in to selling pigs. There's a buyer 20 miles from me in Hallettsville. 25 cents a pound. Even if I were trapping a lot of 'em (I'm not, yet, not here) that's hardly worth the gas to mess with. I trap for vittles. I'm lazy and a day time person. I'd rather snuggle with mama when the pigs are on the prowl. :D I set the trap and take my chances with it. I've trapped a lot of hogs on my other place, but we just got here several months ago. We have pigs, get 'em on the game cam, just haven't found their way to the trap, YET.

MCgunner
March 25, 2013, 09:39 PM
Aw, I dunno, HB. Hogs have been imported into the US since way back in the sailing-ship days.

Used to be, what we now call feral hogs were relatively-free-ranging, but were a meat source for both owners and the markets. Remember, prior to WW II, almost half the workforce was on-farm. Now, under three percent of the workforce. Far fewer people "working the land" on a daily basis.

Times changed. Now we have pork factories and egg factories and so forth. Free-ranging hogs pretty much stayed free-ranging. And, as been noted, they have two or three litters per year and several piglets per litter.

LOL, and my wife bought 8 chickens at TSC the other day. We know 6 are hens, other two were unsexed, probably going to be roosters. I just framed a chicken pen, ain't quite finished and don't have the hutch, yet. I told her, eggs and chicken are CHEAP at HEB. Listen to those chicks, CHEEP, CHEEP, CHEEP! But, she thinks they're cute, been buying these chicken magazines. :rolleyes: Oh, well, I guess farm fresh eggs are good for ya, but I HATE cleaning chickens. I'll breast out a hundred wild ducks to avoid cleaning a chicken. :rolleyes: I already told her I'll filet the breast, maybe the thigh, but that's it. I ain't pickin' and I ain't guttin'. Danged things are disgusting. I got no problem butchering a pig, though, go figure. :D With any luck, the coyotes will raid the hen house. There was a pack practically in the front yard the other night. And, the owls and hawks are plentiful. It's a dangerous world out there for a chicken. :D

Well, deer and hogs eat pretty much the same thing. And if you put up a sign that says "For Deer Only", hogs can't read. (Except for Arnold on Green Acres).

An' the pig on the Geico commercials.

Hogs are survivors. Hogs are omnivores, will eat carrion, bird eggs, animals they can catch, about anything, Deer are vegans.

JRH6856
March 25, 2013, 10:18 PM
Hogs are survivors. Hogs are omnivores, will eat carrion, bird eggs, animals they can catch, about anything, Deer are vegans.

Which is why we got more hogs than deer. When the deer can't find food, the hogs still can...the deer.

HB
March 26, 2013, 04:20 AM
I hadn't considered the rise of commercial farming but it makes sense. Most of our land is devoted to agriculture or homes now and the animals that can tolerate both have the highest populations. In Missouri most hunting is by and large over crop fields or in the woods near them (at least above Interstate 70). I don't know how many people use feeders to attract deer but from what I gather it is far less frequent here than it is in TX and some other states. Hogs are becoming a problem in southern Mo but nearly as widespread as it is down there. I'd like to keep it that way!

I feel that hunting in TX is much different that it is here but regardless of what you use as "bait", hogs can present a major problem. I won't go into my opinions of what constitutes as baiting but any corn field would be a hot spot for hogs (and is for deer) in my area.

HB

Double Naught Spy
March 26, 2013, 10:15 AM
Tx Feral Pig Population To Double

The article in the OP notes the population at 2.5 million, which is too many hogs. HOWEVER, and this is a big HOWEVER, the doubling population seems to be a bit of a myth.

The scientists estimate with such a harvest the feral hog population will still double every five years. Even a high harvest 41 percent of the population, annually will allow the wild pig population to actually grow by 12 percent a year.

Interesting and scary stats, so I tracked the estimates from the past in a previous thread.
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=675442&highlight=hog+million+population

By a previous article estimates on population growth, we should be closer to 9 million hogs given that we had 2 million in Texas in 2005. Given the current article's estimates of 12% per year increase, we should be at close to 4.95 million hogs today based on the 2005 estimate of 2 million...and yet we are just at 2.5 million. How is that possible?

In the previous article, growth was rated at 18-21% and at 21% and starting in 2005 with 2 million, we should be at over 9 million hogs now.

Note that the claim in the OP article is also out of line. With a sustained growth rate of 12%, a current population of 2.5 million hogs will not double in 5 years. At 12% per year, the population will just be 4.4 million in 5 years. After 6, not 5, it will be 4.93 million. So actually, it will take over 6 years for the population to double, but as noted, the purported potential for doubling stemmed from such a growth rate does not appear to be materializing.

In short, the interpretation of the data appears to be bogus and alarmist. Either the people can't count (population estimate), have miscalculated the population growth rate, or both, as the numbers just aren't there to support the claims being made.

X-Rap
March 26, 2013, 11:18 AM
I can't believe the present day crisis is due to hogs that were brought here in the 1500's. If such were the case we would have seen this explosion a 100 yrs ago. I'm in agreement with those who say the proliferation is due more to the modern "paid hunt" and outfitters and land owners wanting more options/income than what was native and controled by game dept's. As far as charging to hunt, I have no problem with trespass fees and the like to the point that my tax and license fees go to the landowner who makes claims against damage but keeps his land closed up.

MCgunner
March 26, 2013, 12:24 PM
At some point, the population of those hogs HAS to go well beyond carrying capacity and then crash in a typical J growth pattern. This is normal for animals with very high natality rates regardless of predation, like rabbits. I don't, however, have a clue where that carrying capacity is for hogs in an average Texas habitat. This is what biologists spend all their time doing, but that article never mentions carrying capacity.

alsaqr
March 26, 2013, 02:18 PM
The article in the OP notes the population at 2.5 million, which is too many hogs. HOWEVER, and this is a big HOWEVER, the doubling population seems to be a bit of a myth.


Yep!!

i'm not a biologist. i have spent thousands of hours hunting, observing and trapping wild hogs. Much of the stuff printed about wild hogs flys in the face of reason. Authors of wild hog "studies" often fail to mention the fact that many wild pigs die: The coyotes and bobcats kill pigs, big boars kill pigs, and fire ants kill some pigs. Heck, 10-15 percent of farm raised pigs die before reaching market weight.

Every wild hog "study" i have ever read makes a big deal about wild hogs being prolific breeders. They talk about sows being bred at 32 weeks of age, huge litters and two or three litters per year. They almost never mention the effect of drought, lack of acorns, pecans, etc on wild sow breeding. The vast majority of sows in the areas i hunt have one litter per year; in a good year.

IME: Wild sows seldom breed before one year of age. i have killed and trapped dozens of 1-3 year old sows that have never borne a litter. Some counties in central OK had a very good pecan crop last year. The vast majority of sows are either running with litters or pregnant. The same is not true of SW OK.

You can't take data collected from pig farming and apply that data to wild hogs. Yet, numerous fish and game biologists and others do just that.

JRH6856
March 26, 2013, 03:42 PM
I don't, however, have a clue where that carrying capacity is for hogs in an average Texas habitat.

Hogs, as has been noted, eat just about anything. That means that as the hog population grows, it competes with other wildlife for sustenance. Other animals are not as flexible in their diet so hogs have the advantage there. The common need is water, and we don't exactly have an abundance of that.

FTG-05
March 26, 2013, 07:46 PM
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Today:

http://128.192.20.53/nfsms/

TexasPatriot.308
March 30, 2013, 10:06 PM
I still got my deer feeders going, sometimes it is like a black cloud coming out of the brush, solid pigs, I open up with an AR, AK, mini 14 whatever I got in my truck, then got to spend a good half hour dragging them off to the gut pile. got lots of fat lazy buzzards and coyotes around now.

EmbarkChief
April 4, 2013, 06:51 PM
I saw the first sign of hogs on our farm in Bastrop, Texas in 2007. Before that day we had never even heard of any hog sightings in our area since we have owned the property (1974). I must admit I was really excited at first, had something big and bad to go shoot with no restrictions! Was able to justify my first AR-15 purchase and then my M1A. Now its a war of attrition out there, a loaded rifle must be kept within arms reach at all times if you want to have any chance of success. There is just no ryme or reason to the darn things.

turbonoma
April 5, 2013, 12:47 PM
Hi, I live in Puerto Rico and we are seeing more and more hogs in the mountains along the the northern part of the island. They have a good supply of vegetation to sustain and are of considerable size. Waiting on an opportunity to go out hunting.

JRH6856
April 5, 2013, 06:07 PM
Hi, I live in Puerto Rico and we are seeing more and more hogs in the mountains along the the northern part of the island. They have a good supply of vegetation to sustain and are of considerable size. Waiting on an opportunity to go out hunting.
Well, one good thing about Puerto Rico; unless the hogs are really good swimmers, they can't get away. Of course the bad thing is if you don't kill them fast enough you'll be neck deep in hogs.

nathan
April 5, 2013, 06:41 PM
Let s just say , They are here to stay. In the next ten years the hog pop could reach six million unless something happens like a hog virus that would put a dent on their propagation. These hogs are really very resilient and adaptable. More collateral damage , too, on farmlands as they root them every single night looking for tubers, roots, worms and other crawlies.

allaroundhunter
April 5, 2013, 07:15 PM
it wouldnt be so bad but talking to some ranchers, they want to rid themselves of the hogs.
But they want to charge us 50-100$ a hunt

That is cheap.... Most everywhere I see is charging $250 minimum, and they are filling up without a problem.

The problem is that hunters alone cannot control the population. The feral hog herd in Texas is far to large for hunters to kill enough (by conventional means) to keep their population in check.

Sent from my HTC One X

osage48
April 12, 2013, 12:54 PM
I am a land owner and a hunter. I know very few people that call themselves hunters that I would allow on my property. It is amazing how many people call themselves accomplished hunters out for that big buck that shoot the first thing with antlers they see.

As far as hogs go, give me a helicopter or quality night vision. That will help solve the problem.

Sav .250
April 12, 2013, 02:16 PM
The Jimmy dean brand needs to set up shop in Texas.

nathan
April 12, 2013, 05:40 PM
Wild hog meat is good . Just be aware of the brucellosis disease which can be nasty to humans.


http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=6086587

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