7.62x39 versus bear?


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FireInCairo
March 23, 2013, 11:11 AM
Is this round capable of taking out a bear? Would you use FMJ? Hollowpoint? Would it require multiple shots?

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browningguy
March 23, 2013, 11:16 AM
Anything is possible, but there are much better cartridges to use.

wnycollector
March 23, 2013, 12:17 PM
What kind of bear? If you are talking coastal Alaskan brown bear, I think you may be under gunned. If you are talking 200-250lb Eastern US black bear the Wolf 154gr SP or Corbon 150gr SP 7.62x39 ammo should do the trick. Both of those loads have ballistics similar to the venerable 30/30 150gr load and hunter's killed a lot of deer and bears with that load for the last 75+ years.

jmr40
March 23, 2013, 12:22 PM
Native Alaskans have taken Polar Bear with 223. Doing so is not exactly on my bucket list, but it has been done.

The 7.26X39 wouldn't be near the top of my list, but if it is what I had, and I wanted to hunt black bear, I'd load it with the better quality, heavier bullets and go hunting.

I'd say a heavy loaded 308 would be about my minimum for the big bear.

taraquian
March 23, 2013, 12:25 PM
I think its perfect! Now we have a need for 30 round mags hunting :D

Really though, for bear protection at camp I think it would be better than most pistols, but for hunting bear I would choose something with more range and more mass.

MCgunner
March 23, 2013, 12:54 PM
Black bear, yes. Use a 150 grain bullet. Wolf 154 is great for cheap store bought. Good luck finding some right now, though. Any other species, do yourself a favor....:D

MCgunner
March 23, 2013, 12:56 PM
Really though, for bear protection at camp I think it would be better than most pistols, but for hunting bear I would choose something with more range and more mass.

Depends. Lots of black bear are shot over bait barrels at bow range.

shinyroks
March 23, 2013, 12:56 PM
I think it also depends on your platform. Longer barrels give more velocity, etc, and bolt actions better accuracy, so a Yugo SKS with a 24" barrel is going to outperform an AK with a 16" with the same rounds, and a bolt can usually be loaded to higher pressures than the norm. I have loaded my Yugo with 190 grain lead effectively, and might have it as a camp defense weapon, but would prefer something larger if I actually expected to meet a bear when hes already wound up... It would be similar to carrying a .357 in the continental states for bear protection. I think it would do, but there are much better rounds/platforms available.

shinyroks
March 23, 2013, 12:59 PM
Depends. Lots of black bear are shot over bait barrels at bow range.
I have never done it, but I believe there is a distinct advantage in shooting one with a bow in that he doesn't hear it, and therefore doesn't know where his aggressor is?

MCgunner
March 23, 2013, 01:01 PM
Why would you care? The 7.62x39 is as much gun as a .30-30. I don't know if one could express how many bear have been killed quite dead with the .30-30 on this page without using scientific notation. I hunt hogs from a tripod stand. No bear here, but I mean, I ain't worried about the SKS stopping them if it'll stop a hog and it has quite dead. Bear can climb, but not very fast. I'm guessing I could empty a 20 round mag faster. :D

Casefull
March 23, 2013, 02:46 PM
No problem. Lots better than most pistols.

nathan
March 23, 2013, 03:01 PM
If it hits the CNS , the bear will go down. Know the anatomy of the bear.


A shot on the base of the head and skull will definitely put them down. Thats the least thickness in hide and fur . THe bullet will damage the spine and major arteries.

jim243
March 23, 2013, 03:15 PM
Is this round capable of taking out a bear?

NO! Not heavy enough a bullet to kill it instantly.

A shot behind the head and skull will definitely put them down.

If you are that close, you are already dead.

Most bear hunting is done from a tree stand and over a bait setup, after shooting them the hunter will wait about 30 min to let the bullet or arrow take effect and kill the animal. Even wounded the animal is still quite dangerous. It will take some time for them to bleed out.

Jim

Coyote3855
March 23, 2013, 03:31 PM
NO! Not heavy enough a bullet to kill it instantly.

If you are that close, you are already dead.

Most bear hunting is done from a tree stand and over a bait setup, after shooting them the hunter will wait about 30 min to let the bullet or arrow take effect and kill the animal. Even wounded the animal is still quite dangerous. It will take some time for them to bleed out.

Jim

What's bullet weight got to do with it? 150 grains from my .30-06 does the job.

Not dead if I'm in a tree stand and can place my shot at that location.

shinyroks
March 23, 2013, 03:42 PM
I guess it boils down to what conditions the OP has set for this, is it for personal defense in bear country or hunting bear? Other conditions (on the personal defense side) are what kind of platform you already own, do you have the capabilities of making your own rounds, as well as others. If you feel most comfortable with autoloaders in that caliber, it will take out most camp-intrusive agressive critters if the need arises. Keep it in camp knowing that it will most likely be used for other uses, but in the unlikely scenario (barring you are in the extreme northwest) SHTF with a bear it might come in handy.

There is not really an excuse for using rounds that may or may not be marginal when hunting bears, you owe it to your personal safety and to the bear to use a round you know will take it down humanely, such as a .308 or 30-06 if you insist on 30 cal.

nathan
March 23, 2013, 03:50 PM
THe 8m hollowpoint bullet used in 7.62 x39 will blow inside like a small grenade. Just aim for the base of the skull.

jehicks87
March 23, 2013, 04:12 PM
yes, it is "enough" but I'd feel more comfortable with something stronger. Not that I'm "uncomfortable" with 7.62x39... hell, I plan on hunting one this year with a .45LC, so maybe I'm not the best person to answer this... :D

ShooterGuy
March 23, 2013, 05:27 PM
I like shinyroks answer. Do the job quick and humanely, if you're questioning it then you're probably under gunned and only a jerk sits there pumping rounds out of their mag until something is down and probably shouldn't consider what they're doing as legitimate hunting.

Lloyd Smale
March 23, 2013, 06:43 PM
Shot a couple hogs with my ar in 762x39 and in my experience they are every bit as tough as black bear if not more. thats if your talking bear around 250 lbs and at fairly close range. Big 400lb plus bear are a bit of a differnt story though. For that id probably want a bit more gun.

Lj1941
March 23, 2013, 08:28 PM
It is all in shot placement.:)

mf-dif
March 23, 2013, 11:03 PM
Well I decided to go for it. Went back down this afternoon and it was $175 so I won't be out much if I decide I don't like it. Funny thing is...that it still has the Marlin tag hanging through the sling mount. It looks new but is in the used rack.

Anyone know where I can get extra mags for it? They didn't have any at the store.

Casefull
March 23, 2013, 11:32 PM
Some of you guys act like bears are some fearsome monsters of the woods. Get a grip. Unless you are hunting grizzlys or coastal brown bears an ak round has plenty to kill a bear. I shot an 800lb bull elk last year with a measley .308 150g round at 200 yds. The animal went down same as others shot with my 300wm. Bigger is not always better, just bigger.

JERRY
March 23, 2013, 11:48 PM
if you can do it with a 30-30 you can with a 7.62x39mm.

rcmodel
March 23, 2013, 11:57 PM
If you can do it with a .223, you can do it with a 7.62x39.

Alaskan native ethnec groups use .22 Hornet and GI issue M-16's to kill Polar & Brown Bear when necessary.

Its not the arrow that kills bears.
It's the indian shooting the arrows.

In the case of the .223, or 7.62x39?
They would probably recommed you Shoot more then one arrow!

rc

jerkface11
March 23, 2013, 11:57 PM
Bear is a pretty generic term. Are we talking 150 pound Arkansas black bears? Or a hulking monster of a polar bear?

PlaneJain
March 24, 2013, 12:01 AM
7.62 x 39 has killed all of the big 5 in africa and Kamchatka, illegally for years. Don't use a full metal jacket at all. In most states its illegal to hunt game with FMJ's. They are designed to pass through a body without expanding, and outside of war, you don't want a bullet to continue on 'downstream' after it may have passed through an animal. For bears, you want something that will smash through thick hide and heavy bone. A bullet with a large meplate is a better choice.

Also 'pass' on the hollow points when hunting animals that can burry your carcass in a pile of leaves and dirt and munch on you at their leisure.

FireInCairo
March 24, 2013, 12:31 AM
7.62 x 39 has killed all of the big 5 in africa and Kamchatka, illegally for years. Don't use a full metal jacket at all. In most states its illegal to hunt game with FMJ's. They are designed to pass through a body without expanding, and outside of war, you don't want a bullet to continue on 'downstream' after it may have passed through an animal. For bears, you want something that will smash through thick hide and heavy bone. A bullet with a large meplate is a better choice.

Also 'pass' on the hollow points when hunting animals that can burry your carcass in a pile of leaves and dirt and munch on you at their leisure.
Could you clarify? It sounds like you're saying don't use FMJ and don't use hollowpoint. What would you use instead of either of those?

meanmrmustard
March 24, 2013, 01:26 PM
Could you clarify? It sounds like you're saying don't use FMJ and don't use hollowpoint. What would you use instead of either of those?
Soft points I believe, and I speculate, is what he means.

If so, I agree.

shinyroks
March 24, 2013, 03:56 PM
Could you clarify? It sounds like you're saying don't use FMJ and don't use hollowpoint. What would you use instead of either of those?
If you are intent on using that round to hunt bear, you need to find a flatpoint solid or cast to effectively penetrate while still causing damage. See if Buffalo Bore or a like company makes them, or make friends locally and 'special order'. I am not sure, but you may find rounds like that from Norma.

Speedo66
March 24, 2013, 09:31 PM
People seem to feel well armed walking around in bear country with a .357 or .44.

Neither has anywhere near the energy of a 7.62x39, plus pistols are much less accurate than a rifle.

The word "magnum" doesn't mean much to a bear, lots of energy does.

I think you'd be fine if you're talking black bear.

Chris-bob
March 25, 2013, 02:45 AM
I have a buddy(that I personally know) that takes his annual spring black bear with his SKS. He loads his own hunting rounds, however.

JShirley
March 25, 2013, 09:03 AM
As wnycollector asked, what kind of bear? Black bears averaging under 250 lbs, sure, a good softpoint will work fine. Basically, almost all good deer cartridges (I wouldn't use anything that starts with ".24") also work fine for black bear.

If you're talking Alaskan/Canadian bears, that's a different story. .30-06 is the least amount of rifle I'd want in that case.

John

303tom
March 25, 2013, 10:51 AM
Is this round capable of taking out a bear? Would you use FMJ? Hollowpoint? Would it require multiple shots?
Not in my book...............

Aaron1100us
March 25, 2013, 11:38 AM
Double lung it with 7.62x39 fmj and the bear isnt going to go too far.

Sent from my SCH-R760 using Tapatalk 2

Speedo66
March 25, 2013, 02:26 PM
Within the last 3 years several 800 lb black bears have been taken in NJ. I believe some of these were almost hand fed pizza and donut eating pets, and one such even had a name, Bozo. He was taken with a crossbow.

I think the overweight condition of the bears has a lot to do with the general condition of the local human population. These were fast food eaters, not salad eating bears. Not sure if they could still climb trees, or even run. Probably on Medicaid for obesity. :D

Link here about them. http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/newshound/2011/12/two-record-black-bears-taken-new-jersey

meanmrmustard
March 25, 2013, 02:35 PM
Not in my book...............
Where we have the possibilities of running into wayward cougars in the Show Me State, I wouldn't feel undergunned.

Pretty sure I saw one last season on opening weekend. In a CRP field between two wood lots on HWY 3 near Elmer. Sure you've heard of the place.

But, I was packing 762x54R. Felt a lil better.

shinyroks
March 25, 2013, 03:02 PM
Within the last 3 years several 800 lb black bears have been taken in NJ. I believe some of these were almost hand fed pizza and donut eating pets, and one such even had a name, Bozo. He was taken with a crossbow.

I think the overweight condition of the bears has a lot to do with the general condition of the local human population. These were fast food eaters, not salad eating bears. Not sure if they could still climb trees, or even run. Probably on Medicaid for obesity. :D

Link here about them. http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/newshound/2011/12/two-record-black-bears-taken-new-jersey
This thread has taken an odd turn, seems to happen about the end of the second page, eh?

kbbailey
March 25, 2013, 03:32 PM
...All i can say is that the AK-47 style pistol with a 30rd clip that I fired into my backstop last November laid down some of the most impressive firepower that I have ever seen. It absolutely riddled my steel targets, and tore through the other targets with eye-opening authority. I would feel pretty well armed with one of these things slung over my shoulder.

Inebriated
March 25, 2013, 03:33 PM
For defense or hunting?

For defense, it's fine. You have a lot of deep-penetrating rounds on tap.

For hunting, there's better.

WardenWolf
March 25, 2013, 04:22 PM
Get the PRVI Partizan round nose soft point. That'll put a hurt on anything. It may not be ideal for large bear, but it'll do the job, particularly since you can fire it very quickly.

tahunua001
March 25, 2013, 05:55 PM
given 125gr soft points a 7.62x39 can take down blackbear but I wouldn't take one out for anything larger.

T.R.
March 25, 2013, 06:08 PM
I'll join in on this absurdly hypothetical debate. Since these great bears are not armor-plated, a 123 grain soft tip will indeed penetrate the chest wall. It's hard to state how many of these bullets it will take to topple the bruin.

I personally would not hunt the great bears with anything less than my .308 loaded with 200 grain Speer bonded bullets.

TR

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/bear-1.jpg

tahunua001
March 25, 2013, 06:21 PM
I for one am taking a 6.5 jap with 140 grain ammo for black bear this year...
normally a 243 or 30-30 are easily able to take blackbear...

PlaneJain
March 25, 2013, 06:34 PM
Could you clarify? It sounds like you're saying don't use FMJ and don't use hollowpoint. What would you use instead of either of those?



Yes, I would not use either of these if I had the choice. For hunting one, use a well built soft point Barnes or Nosler that is designed to hold together when smashing through heavy bone on big animals. Nothing like an AK47 FMJ designed for people. Although Nosler Partitions etc are hollowpoints with a plastic tip, they are designed for penetration of big game, thick skinned animals. A regular hollow point wont make it past the hide or if its a bear in late summer fall, wont make it past its fat it has been building up.

As for those here who have previously said a double lung shot and he wont go far, well, bear blood is vastly different than human blood, and their cells carry so much more oxygen than ours does, that although the wound 'should' have killed the bear, he more than likely will kill you before he realizes he is 'dead'. Get a bigger gun. ;)

And I'm not a He. :p

PlaneJain
March 25, 2013, 06:40 PM
Just to add a little color to the thread:
http://i1009.photobucket.com/albums/af219/Planejain/Alaska%20too/DSC_8930_zps5a2a1c88.jpg



:)

meanmrmustard
March 25, 2013, 06:40 PM
^^^Apologies, ma'am. If I'd been a bit more attentive, I'd have caught that.

PlaneJain
March 25, 2013, 06:44 PM
Not a problem ColonelMustard! lol

And as for pistol vs rifle energy etc, besides energy, meplate means a lot. And sometimes its easier to work outdoors with a pistol, than a rifle, and you resort to what you have to do, doesn't mean its always the best.

Dthunter
March 26, 2013, 06:52 PM
I have shot a bunch of bears with it.
Mostly in a Ruger hawkeye compact.
150 grain Sirerra gameking.

My sister In law shot a nice boar I guided her to last spring.



http://i1121.photobucket.com/albums/l501/darcytyndall/2012-05-05210912.jpg

meanmrmustard
March 26, 2013, 08:52 PM
Not a problem ColonelMustard! lol

And as for pistol vs rifle energy etc, besides energy, meplate means a lot. And sometimes its easier to work outdoors with a pistol, than a rifle, and you resort to what you have to do, doesn't mean its always the best.
Meplate? You'll have to elaborate.

I have no handgun hunting under my belt, but I'm familiar with their capabilities and know a few gents who do.

I must admit, I put blackies in the same categories as bigger deer; soft skinned, medium weight game. I feel a nice, bonded bullet does a number on Hoover game. While the closest thing we have to bears in MO that I fear are the rare cougars.

I see no qualms with a 156 sp 762x39, heavy 30-30, or a thumping pistol round.

I, myself, would use 6.5x55 Swede. I'm its newest advocate.

PlaneJain
March 26, 2013, 09:54 PM
for something like an SKS or AK-47 or even a Ruger Mini 30 etc, its hard to have a good bullet for taking game that has a large meplate surface (the flatness of the front). You need a fmj type bullet to cycle. For hunting, especially large dangerous game, a bullet with a large flat front is superb. The larger the meplate, the bigger the wound channel and kinetic energy transfer will be.

Thats why something like a 45 acp is so effective as a home defense round because of its larger frontal mass. You want the bullet to do as much tissue damage as it passes through bone and muscle and internal organs. Not only just from the wound channel, but from the impact of the bullet > (picture an automobile head on collision where internal organs are jumbled around on impact that although the person may survive the impact, internally they often bleed to death from the ruptured arteries, etc.) Thats what a larger meplate will do over a pointed bullet.

meanmrmustard
March 26, 2013, 11:05 PM
I'd have to disagree with you here, Jain.

Bonded bullets, like CorBon in 150, will retain most of their weight, and expand reliably to transfer the energy inside the bear.

While I agree that a large frontal area is a good thing, I think energy transfer, hydrostatic shock, wound cavities caused by controlled expansion are the key here, whether the bullet is pointy or not. Heck, bullets designed to yaw cause massive trauma, huge wound channels, and aren't necessarily designed to expand at all.

As an aside, I've never had any issues feeding any bullets into any AK, SKS, or bolt carbine in the x39 chambering other than a singular beater Maadi.

killer66
March 27, 2013, 10:09 PM
the made in china sks 7.62x39 can I shoot the 7.62x54 in this gun and what is the difference in the two shells

MCgunner
March 27, 2013, 10:12 PM
Umm, would be like shooting a .30=06 in a .30-30, but reverse the rims. :rolleyes: IOW, fagedaboudit.

Some of you people scare me. I'm glad I don't have to shoot at a public range anymore.

Inebriated
March 27, 2013, 10:25 PM
the made in china sks 7.62x39 can I shoot the 7.62x54 in this gun and what is the difference in the two shells
So instead of being unhelpful and rude, I'll try to help.

The cartridge is 7.62x39. That means the bullet is 7.62 mm in diameter, and the case is 39 mm long. Any time you see a cartridge name like that, that's what it means. Same for 5.45x39, 5.56x39, 6x45, 7.62x25, 9x19, 9x18, the list goes on.

So a 7.62x54R cartridge will have a 7.62 mm diameter bullet, but a 54 mm long case. The longer case equates to more powder, which equates to considerably more power. The "R" at the end designates it as a "rimmed" case. Think like a shotgun shell... it has a rim around the base. If you tried to put a 7.62x54R cartridge in your SKS, it would not fit the magazine or chamber. If you somehow managed to make it fit (you can't), you would likely blow the gun up, because of the extra pressure of the 7.62x54R cartridge.

MCgunner
March 28, 2013, 10:59 AM
I don't think working pressure is any higher in 7.62x54 than 7.62x39. Can't find it for 7.62x54R, though, but it's 45K PSI for 7.62x39. Moot as the 54mm cartridge won't fit in the 39mm chamber aside from other dimensional differences.

I see all these posts on this board, "Will my .410 shotgun shoot .45 Colt?" or "Can I shoot a .458 WM in my .45-70?" or similar. Well, read the box of ammo, should have a statement on there "use only in firearms chambered for this round" or some such. SAFETY, it's a SAFETY thing. BE SAFE! That's not rude, that's just sound advice. I wouldn't care what you did, but you might hurt yourself and maybe someone at the bench next to you.

mookiie
March 28, 2013, 11:45 PM
I believe I recall an article on a bear from Alaska that had something like 14 or 15 7.62x39mm projectiles from an AK 47 that had to be put down with a higher powered rifle. I would not want to go after a bear with 7.62x39mm unless I KNEW I would be at a safe enough distance to take multiple shots.

72guns92
March 28, 2013, 11:51 PM
I think Elmer Keith told someone that he didn't believe a 105howizter was to big if your hunting bear, just my 2 cents, Semper Fi

saturno_v
March 29, 2013, 01:08 AM
I don't think working pressure is any higher in 7.62x54 than 7.62x39. Can't find it for 7.62x54R, though, but it's 45K PSI for 7.62x39. Moot as the 54mm cartridge won't fit in the 39mm chamber aside from other dimensional differences.



The 7.62x54R is a much higher pressure cartridge than the x39....the 54R does not have any official SAAMI rating but by the CIP rating it is a 58K psi cartridge.....

MCgunner
March 29, 2013, 09:50 PM
I believe I recall an article on a bear from Alaska that had something like 14 or 15 7.62x39mm projectiles from an AK 47 that had to be put down with a higher powered rifle. I would not want to go after a bear with 7.62x39mm unless I KNEW I would be at a safe enough distance to take multiple shots.

Did someone mention Alaska and browns? Black bear are NOT that big.

OilyPablo
March 29, 2013, 10:10 PM
I think with a 30 round mag of hot eastern bloc ammo in my AK, I would feel adequately protected in bear country.

saturno_v
March 30, 2013, 12:20 AM
The 30-30 overall is a significantly more effective round against heavier game compared to the 7,62x39...you can fire up to a 190 gr. slug with the venerable 30 WCF.

shinyroks
March 30, 2013, 12:28 AM
Did someone mention Alaska and browns? Black bear are NOT that big.
If I remember correctly, last year there was an 800 lb black bear shot up by Steamboat springs...

majortoo
May 15, 2013, 10:57 PM
I seem to recall that several countries in Europe have hunting rules that prohibit smaller cartridges such as the 30-30, 7.62X39 and the like for large game. Not enough kinetic energy, thus not fair to the animal. Yes, those cartridges have been and will continue to be used in this country. As noted, some people even hunt moose with a .22. Does that make it right? Don't get me wrong. I have hunted, and enjoyed it. I like venison, pheasant, rabbit and other wild game on my table. I merely suggest that you bring enough gun to the game. WWEKD? (What would Elmer Keith do?) As a related issue, you might check your state and local laws. Some states have a magazine limit for hunting deer and bear. Your thirty round banana clip could get confiscated, along with your toy rifle.

Also, just saw a news item from Alaska. A deer hunter with a semi auto 7mm Magnum was attacked by a 1,600 pound grizzly. The hunter emptied the rifle at the attacking bear, and finally stopped it just a few feet away. Local authorities analyzed the contents of the bear's stomach and found the remains of two humans who had died within the previous 72 hours. They also found wounds from four .38 special cartridges. The revolver was found later near the remains of a hiker. To get an idea of the size of that bear, when he stood on his hind legs he would be 14 feet tall. If you were standing next to him, you would be looking at his navel. He could look into your second story bedroom window!

68wj
May 16, 2013, 07:33 PM
Not that giant man eater again. :rolleyes:

Marlin 45 carbine
May 16, 2013, 07:55 PM
better choices are available for sure but load a x39 with a 150gr fb sp Sierra slug and you have some 'whack' there.
have took good-sized whitetail does (doe tags) easily with the 123gr Win sp. one shot drt around 50 ms. 2x Burris glass.

hedrok
May 17, 2013, 11:13 AM
The whole concept of needing to empty a 30 rd. mag into an animal...any animal...because the hunter didn't take the time to practice enough to be good enough to make a clean kill shot, I personally find to be disgusting on multiple levels.
First...the primary purpose for hunting is food. A lot of it would be contaminated and wasted.
Next, there is no point to making an animal suffer just so that the hunter can get a macho thrill killing something by blasting it apart.
Further...I'm pretty sure it's illegal almost anywhere in the civilized world to have more than a 4 or 5 rd. capability in a hunting weapon.
Next, it's disrespectful to anyone who hunts to participate in a slaughter rather than a hunt. Big difference.
Lastly, In the case of the "intentionally undergunned hunter"...I'll root for the bear.

We used to joke about a mythical book called "Revenge of the Tiger" by Claude Balls.
Wanna write a new chapter???:evil:

jerkface11
May 17, 2013, 11:20 AM
Further...I'm pretty sure it's illegal almost anywhere in the civilized world to have more than a 4 or 5 rd. capability in a hunting weapon.

No mag limit in Arkansas at all. Maybe we aren't civilized enough for you.

hedrok
May 17, 2013, 11:48 AM
I'm not sure if "civilized" is the word I should have used...but it was what came to mind.

HoosierQ
May 17, 2013, 12:38 PM
the made in china sks 7.62x39 can I shoot the 7.62x54 in this gun and what is the difference in the two shells
Holy Smokes! Those two rounds are very, very different. 7.62x39 is 39 milimeters long. 762x54R is 54 milimeter long...and has a rim. Do the math. NO THEY ARE NOT INTERCHANGEABLE:what::what::what::uhoh::eek:

josiewales
May 17, 2013, 01:03 PM
Well, you do have 30 rounds...

josiewales
May 17, 2013, 01:05 PM
...and I think this thread is getting hijacked. :rolleyes:

jerkface11
May 17, 2013, 10:29 PM
There isn't a bear in this state you couldn't take with a 7.62x39.

Glen
May 17, 2013, 10:48 PM
Bears have teeth and claws and even black bears sometimes eat people. Full Metal Jacket bullets are out; they don't expand. But the main point is, I would use this cartridge as a defense against any bear only if I had nothing else bigger. I wouldn't hunt with it. People often compare this round to the 30/30, but these 7.62 X 39's shoot light bullets, not relatively heavy ones like the 30/30. Hey, heavy critter, heavy bullet--that's what I say. Of course for big bears, maybe it becomes magnum time.

jerkface11
May 17, 2013, 11:34 PM
Glen not all bears are big. They average around 100 pounds down here. So 7.62x39 would be just fine with 150 ish grain bullets.

rxspeed88
May 18, 2013, 09:51 AM
I wouldnt buy that caliber specifically for bear hunting. But... if thats what i had to take, i would make sure i was comfortable with it and i wouldnt want to take a shot over about 50 yards and even thats pushing it. I always take some sort of magnum (7mm or 300 win) with me on our bear trips. It gives me a little more lee-way with placement and it carries enough arse to put them down in their tracks.

Will it take a bear. yes.
Would i use it as a camp firearm with a 30rnd mag and underfolder stock. yes
are there lots of better options. yes.

denton
May 18, 2013, 05:50 PM
A couple of technical points...

My SKS won't shoot heavy bullets accurately. If you are going to rely on a 7.62x39 for protection, it's worth checking to see if that's a problem with your particular rifle.

Hollow points work well for game with handguns where velocities tend to be low and you need some mechanism for getting bullets to open. In rifles, hollow points are used to decrease drag for target shooting. Out of a rifle, hollow points are a poor choice for game. They open too much and too fast, and penetrate poorly. FMJs do not open at all. Both FMJs and hollow points and are much less effective than soft points on game at rifle velocities.

Flat nosed bullets seem to perform much better than most people expect on game. Out of my 30-30, my bullet of choice would probably be a 170 grain lead flat point at around 2000 FPS.

The kinetic energy of a bullet out of a 44 Mag is not all that different from the energy of bullets out of 5.56x45 or 7.62x39 rifles.

The 7.62x54R is in the 308 to 30-06 class for power.

dprice3844444
May 18, 2013, 06:11 PM
just make sure you can run faster than the folks you are hunting with

351 WINCHESTER
May 18, 2013, 06:30 PM
It that was the only gun I had I could make it work. I made a .22 lr work for years.

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