may be a little different type of question...


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32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 01:59 AM
Im just getting into reloading, so im not real familiar with all the availible powders and such...

Ive got a ruger lcr .357 that im going to reload for. (just waiting on the dies)
Its a great little gun and gets lots of looks at the range as well.

Im just wondering, what would i use if i wanted to put on a "show" so to speak?
My kids love how loud it is and think its great seeing the cloud come out and feeling the shock-wave on some of the rounds i shoot. What combination of powder/bullet would give me a loud, and entertaining round? Not looking for something extremely accurate or anything thats gonna blow my gun up, just something a little fun! Thanks

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HighExpert
March 29, 2013, 02:24 AM
I really think fireworks might be a better hobby for you. I don't really think of guns as toys to "put on a show with". Just my opinion.

Lost Sheep
March 29, 2013, 02:24 AM
Black powder would make a satisfying cloud of smoke. Be sure to clean THOROUGHLY after shooting. Black powder residue promotes rust and corrosion like nobody's business.

Running spectacular loads (noise, flame, recoil) out of the LCR is bound to shorten its life and will likely hurt your shooting hand as well. The LCR is light (recoil will be fierce) and not as strong as the GP100 or even the SP101.

Ruger's reputation for super-strong guns is well-deserved, but the smaller and lighter a gun is, the less heavy use (or abuse) it can take.

Lost Sheep

32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 02:41 AM
I guess i may be wording it a little wrong... Im not trying to get an "explosion" out of my gun... I just wondered- with a standard load, what types of powder are noisier or flashier? I know that shooting power pistol through my 9mm seems louder and flashier than shooting green dot through it, though ive only shot a few rounds of each...

Im just not real familiar with other brands of powder. Most people look for quiter/cleaner powders, and i just am going a little the opposite direction. Hopefully this makes a little more sense.

Mike 27
March 29, 2013, 02:50 AM
H110 will give you some flash. I get a lot out of my GP100, and even more out of my S&W M60, but only really care to shoot the snubby a few times running .357's out of it. I usually stick to .38 spl's out of the snubby.

Lost Sheep
March 29, 2013, 02:53 AM
I really think fireworks might be a better hobby for you. I don't really think of guns as toys to "put on a show with". Just my opinion.
I agree with the advice, but not necessarily the underlying assumption.

However, having opened the discussion over whether or not you (32_d3gr33s) are sufficiently prepared to reload is an open question.

Are you?

Loading is not rocket science, but it does involve smoke and flame and things that go very fast and is not to be taken lightly.

Eye and ear protection for you and all bystanders.

Care about lead contamination (from bullets and especially from primers), especially for children.

Be VERY careful about every step and be ABSOLUTELY sure of each step before proceeding to the next. Some actions cannot be undone.

Study up. "The ABC's of Reloading" and the early chapters of almost every reloading manual out there is filled with good advice and the "how-to" of loading. Each one is unique in its approach and writing style, so reading many will expose you to a variety of advisors in print. Check with your local library. The age of the manuals is not important because you are not using the load data, but the instructions of how to load. How to load has not changed much in the past 100 years, not since smokeless powder.

There is a lot of good information on the internet but there is a lot of idiocy there, too. Stick with reputable web sites for the most part, like
http://www.nosler.com/articles/category/reloading/
and other sites owned by manufacturers with reputations. Individuals with reputations are OK, too, but be sure to vett them. It's your life, fingers, eyes and those of your kids and anyone else near you when you fire the gun or are in the process of loading the ammo.

Like I said, it isn't rocket science. If you can change a tire without losing your lug nuts and make a cake following the recipe you can reload. But it is a LOT more risky than car maintenance or cooking. So, take care. Be safe. Always. All ways.

Lost Sheep

Doug b
March 29, 2013, 02:55 AM
To answer your questions Alliant 2400 will do what you want and give outstanding accuracy to boot.Never shot a 357 that didn't like 14.5 grs. 2400 and a 158gr.xtp bullet touched off with a STANDARD small pistol primer.Work your way up from start this is getting close to a max charge.

32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 03:02 AM
H110 will give you some flash. I get a lot out of my GP100, and even more out of my S&W M60, but only really care to shoot the snubby a few times running .357's out of it. I usually stick to .38 spl's out of the snubby.

Thanks! Thats the type of info im looking for! I have put a few hundred .38 through it, effortlessly. The .357 do give your hand quite a beating so i only shoot 5 or 10 of those at a time.


I agree with the advice, but not necessarily the underlying assumption.

However, having opened the discussion over whether or not you (32_d3gr33s) are sufficiently prepared to reload is an open question.

Are you?

Loading is not rocket science, but it does involve smoke and flame and things that go very fast and is not to be taken lightly.

Eye and ear protection for you and all bystanders.

Care about lead contamination (from bullets and especially from primers), especially for children.

Be VERY careful about every step and be ABSOLUTELY sure of each step before proceeding to the next. Some actions cannot be undone.

Study up. "The ABC's of Reloading" and the early chapters of almost every reloading manual out there is filled with good advice and the "how-to" of loading. Each one is unique in its approach and writing style, so reading many will expose you to a variety of advisors in print. Check with your local library. The age of the manuals is not important because you are not using the load data, but the instructions of how to load. How to load has not changed much in the past 100 years, not since smokeless powder.

There is a lot of good information on the internet, too, but there is a lot of idiocy there, too. Stick with reputable web sites for the most part, like
http://www.nosler.com/articles/category/reloading/
and other sites owned by manufacturers with reputations. Individuals with reputations are OK, too, but be sure to vett them. It's your life, finger, eyes and those of your kids and anyone else near you when you fire the gun or are in the process of loading the ammo.

Like I said, it isn't rocket science. If you can change a tire without losing your lug nuts and make a cake following the recipe you can reload. But it is a LOT more risky than car maintenance or cooking. So, take care. Be safe. Always. All ways.

Lost Sheep

Im perfectly well prepared to reload. Ive done lots of reading. LOTS! Im just not extremely well versed in all the available powders. Ive been shooting for years, and now my kids (age 10 and 12) are getting into shooting as well. I know all of the dangers of guns, along with my kids. They just get a kick out of the .357 so id see if anyone had input on some interesting loads for it. I also have 2400. I just really need to get a few rounds loaded, so i can see the differences first hand. Reading about them is one thing, but actually loading them and comparing them first hand is completely different. Thanks for your concern though ! :)

32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 03:04 AM
To answer your questions Alliant 2400 will do what you want and give outstanding accuracy to boot.Never shot a 357 that didn't like 14.5 grs. 2400 and a 158gr.xtp bullet touched off with a STANDARD small pistol primer.Work your way up from start this is getting close to a max charge.

Well thats great news! I happen to have a pound of that already!

Doug b
March 29, 2013, 03:06 AM
Be sure to load that H110 with a mag primer.Alliant powders with a standard primer.

stompah
March 29, 2013, 03:09 AM
Buy a box of magtech .357 158gr jacket soft point. Way more flash and bang than my h110 loads. Use it sparingly, I swear the dozen or so boxes of that ammo I shot through my sp101 cut the top strap.

I have stood behind someone shooting my reloads and magtech. Magtechs blow flames out of the front of the cylinder for at least 6 inches. Where my h110 loads barely show light. Likewise with the muzzle flash.

32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 03:17 AM
Buy a box of magtech .357 158gr jacket soft point. Way more flash and bang than my h110 loads. Use it sparingly, I swear the dozen or so boxes of that ammo I shot through my sp101 cut the top strap.

I have stood behind someone shooting my reloads and magtech. Magtechs blow flames out of the front of the cylinder for at least 6 inches. Where my h110 loads barely show light. Likewise with the muzzle flash.
wow thats hilarious. Those are the exact rounds that i was shooting! Couldnt get anyone else to shoot the gun after me so i couldnt see the effects... guess ill have to use them sparingly

stompah
March 29, 2013, 03:30 AM
I had a lcr and I shot those same magtechs through it too. Definitely not fun!

gamestalker
March 29, 2013, 05:20 AM
Honestly, the load I shoot exclusively from all of my .357's will not only put on a great show, but is very accurate, and about as magnum force as it gets.

A 158 gr. or a 125 gr. jacketed bullet, and H110 or W296 powder charge. It is a completely safe load combination that will produce about a 4' white flame, and a shock wave that will knock your socks off. It isn't a smokey load though, just extremely loud, and as flashy as it gets. Myself and my Son's have taken deer with that combination, they drop like a rock!

I don't particularly like to post load specifics on the forum, but you can look up the load specifics on Hogdons reloading site. Just Google Hogdon Reloading pages and match the weight of the jacketed bullet with the powder you'll be using and your all set to go.

When using either one of the two powders mentioned above, use only magnum primers, don't reduce the powder charge to less than the published minimum / starting charge, and use a firm roll crimp that digs into the canelure grove to prevent bullets from jumping out of the case mouths as they approach battery. Those powders, which BTW are exactly the same, produce inconsistent and erratic pressures if you reduce them to less than the published start / minimum charges. And even at starting / minimum charges, I promise you won't be disappointed by any means. Also, it helps to trim your cases to same lengths to keep crimps effectively the same.

Have fun and be safe, with that said, always, always, work up from starting charges, and wear eye and ear protection.

GS

Walkalong
March 29, 2013, 08:38 AM
What combination of powder/bullet would give me a loudLoudshot, err, I mean Longshot.

Want flame? Powder Pistol or Blue Dot.

Want raw power? H-110/W-296.

kingmt
March 29, 2013, 11:36 AM
Be careful with that gun. They are known for the back straps breaking. It is a light weight carry revolver not a daily shooter.

floydster
March 29, 2013, 11:59 AM
kingmt is right--it is not a range gun by any means.

Smokeyloads

buck460XVR
March 29, 2013, 12:09 PM
I really think fireworks might be a better hobby for you. I don't really think of guns as toys to "put on a show with". Just my opinion.


I'm thinking after the newness and the initial intrigue wear off, the OP will be back asking for accurate, more comfortable loads to shoot. Seems most folks new to shooting magnum revolvers desire the same "flame throwing, ground shaking rounds" till they tire of the damage done to their wrists and the guns themselves. Most find that after a while, the pleasure from puttin' all the rounds in a small circle downrange comfortably and often outweighs the thrill of turning heads, big fireballs in low light and making folks recoil shy. My youngest has been shooting magnum handguns since he was 8. Last thing I wanted him to do is to shoot rounds simply for the pleasure of noise and flash. Proper technique and accuracy with loads comfortably shot from the firearm came first before trying to break his wrist and making him flinch from anticipating the recoil from full house magnum loads in a lightweight snubnose. I'm sure the OP will get there too. In the meantime, let him have his fun.

32_d3gr33s
March 29, 2013, 01:04 PM
Be careful with that gun. They are known for the back straps breaking. It is a light weight carry revolver not a daily shooter.
Really? From all the people I've talked to and from what I've read up, there are barely any issues that I've heard of. The first years model had some problems, but most of those were corrected by 2011. My dad has one and he's probably got at least a good 5 or 600 rounds through it in the last year. I probably only shoot it twice a month tops and only put 20 or so rounds through it each time. My 9 is for target practice, 357 is for carry

Hondo 60
March 29, 2013, 01:19 PM
Loud bang, long flame = heavy recoil.

An LCR is NOT intended for this type of round.
You could do major damage to the gun.

If you want that kind of reaction, an old model Blackhawk would handle those "Ruger Only" type loads.

Please stay safe!

Jim Watson
March 29, 2013, 01:25 PM
Power Pistol produces a loud report and bright flash. It is a medium burner, only 5% slower than Unique, so you don't have to ramp up the velocity and put up with a lot of recoil to get a manly appearing load.

There was a guy with fireworks experience who loaded .45 Colts with roman candle balls and various colored additives to put on a real show the evening of a Cowboy shoot. But that was VERY advanced handloading. A sixgun spouting red smoke was a real attraction, though.

rfwobbly
March 29, 2013, 11:12 PM
You mean something like this....

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Ok1-PFcvbZY/TR3ji_KIVqI/AAAAAAAAB6E/-FBMlcKh8dI/s640/flash.jpg

32_d3gr33s
March 30, 2013, 12:39 AM
You mean something like this....

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Ok1-PFcvbZY/TR3ji_KIVqI/AAAAAAAAB6E/-FBMlcKh8dI/s640/flash.jpg
HOLY CRAP!!! Thats a little much! Id like to keep my eyebrows lol

kyhunter
March 30, 2013, 12:42 AM
what in the @#$% is that? ^^^^^^^^

1SOW
March 30, 2013, 12:52 AM
Learn first. Play later.

32_d3gr33s
March 30, 2013, 12:55 AM
Learn first. Play later.
I guess I'm confused by that statement... What exactly are you proposing i learn? Reloading? Is reloading with a noisy powder some special learned skill, or exactly the same as loading with any other powder, just noisier?

cwbys4evr
March 30, 2013, 12:58 AM
Yeah I am kinda curious about that pic too. I would really love to avoid whatever produced that flame of death. I'm partial to Bullseye just ftr.

Reefinmike
March 30, 2013, 01:03 AM
Wanna give a show at the range?
Ask someone to watch your shots and tell you where you are shooting to adjust your sights for your first batch of reloads
In the cylinder
38spl 158gr lswc load with a light 3.4gr charge of win231
A shotshell loaded with ~4.5gr 231 and 140 grains of shot.
A blackpowder load
A empty case with primer only
A full house 357 load using h110/win296

This for sure will give you a show that will clear the range and let you shoot alone :neener:

actually, dont do this... you will likely get kicked out for trolling the range :D

Reefinmike
March 30, 2013, 01:07 AM
I guess I'm confused by that statement... What exactly are you proposing i learn? Reloading? Is reloading with a noisy powder some special learned skill, or exactly the same as loading with any other powder, just noisier?
he means to not do stupid stuff and tread lightly... especially on your first batch of reloads. get a manual, read it front to back. start low and work your way up to close to max .2gr at a time. start shooting the lower charges and work your way up and take not of accuracy, controllability, look for pressure signs(sticky case ejection, flattened or cratered primer hits etc etc). stop at the point you see pressure signs and back it down a tad if that is your favorite load.

cwbys4evr
March 30, 2013, 01:08 AM
I'm confused about the OP experience, not that it is any of my business at all. The first post states just getting into reloading, and subsequent posts cite plenty of reloading experience. Like I said, not really my business, just confused.

Lost Sheep
March 30, 2013, 01:13 AM
Thanks! Thats the type of info im looking for! I have put a few hundred .38 through it, effortlessly. The .357 do give your hand quite a beating so i only shoot 5 or 10 of those at a time.




Im perfectly well prepared to reload. Ive done lots of reading. LOTS! Im just not extremely well versed in all the available powders. Ive been shooting for years, and now my kids (age 10 and 12) are getting into shooting as well. I know all of the dangers of guns, along with my kids. They just get a kick out of the .357 so id see if anyone had input on some interesting loads for it. I also have 2400. I just really need to get a few rounds loaded, so i can see the differences first hand. Reading about them is one thing, but actually loading them and comparing them first hand is completely different. Thanks for your concern though ! :)
OK, then. I had no idea of your level of experience with guns, shooting or reloading.

While my cautionary post may have been unnecessary for you, others will read this thread with the same question as you and not have your level of experience or judgement.

I meant no offense and appreciate the temperance of your response.

Lost Sheep

32_d3gr33s
March 30, 2013, 01:32 AM
You may have misread my post. I have been shooting for a long time, but just started reloading. Ive done lots of reading on reloading and have made up a few batches for my 9mm, but nothing yet for .357. So, long story short, i know how to reload, but im no expert by any means. Im extremely comfortable shooting, but wouldn't consider myself a pro at that either.

OK, then. I had no idea of your level of experience with guns, shooting or reloading.

While my cautionary post may have been unnecessary for you, others will read this thread with the same question as you and not have your level of experience or judgement.

I meant no offense and appreciate the temperance of your response.

Lost Sheep

Im glad there are people who post, making sure that people are careful and take precautionary measures. So thanks for that! I know its hard reading and interpreting the tone of whats being typed, and i know a lot of what i type, could be taken in a negative manner. Im sure their are plenty of people who get into reloading (especially lately) who think they are going to save a quick buck. Some of those people more than likely have no knowledge on reloading, and dont take the time to research properly, and will end up injuring themselves or someone else. Believe me when i say, Im definitely not just diving into this. I am very meticulous with everything I do. Thanks again for your concern, and keep up the Words of wisdom!

Lost Sheep
March 30, 2013, 01:34 AM
I guess I'm confused by that statement... What exactly are you proposing i learn? Reloading? Is reloading with a noisy powder some special learned skill, or exactly the same as loading with any other powder, just noisier?
Mechanically, yes, exactly the same.

Powder selection and some of the finer points (like degree of bullet tension, primer selection and such, is an entire science - Internal Ballistics - that is still, after a couple of centuries still making advances) are more nuanced. Therein lies some dangers, not to be taken too lightly.

Once again. I couch my response for readers of all skill levels. There are many new reloaders out there without benefit of a large supply of teachers.

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
March 30, 2013, 01:47 AM
I started loading with the guy who sold me my press watching over my shoulder as I loaded my first 6 rounds to make sure I did not blow myself up, load a powderless cartridge or set off a primer in the press. I could have learned more, faster with a longer mentoring period, but I learned a lot in those first 6 rounds, as he explained each step. I educated myself after that. But now, on the internet, I have learned a WHOLE LOT MORE. But in-person is still the best.

He loaded 3 and narrated while I watched and asked questions.

I loaded 3 while he watched and ensured I didn't make any mistakes.

That was it. (This was before the Internet. Before VCRs for that matter.)

After that, I read ABC's of Reloading and Lyman's manual and was VERY cautious, loading .357 Magnum at light loads, then 45 ACP, 44 Mag, 9mm and on.

I never experimented until I had completely vetted any new thing I wanted to try. I tried NO NEW EXPERIMENTS without thinking it through, researching in the gun magazines and library. And then, with lots of safety precautions.

Even at that, I was lucky. But you know, Luck favors the prepared.

Would I have been better educated and better off had I been able to attend a class or had an experienced loader teach me more thoroughly? Definitely yes. I would have been using eye protection while loading much sooner, for instance. I probably would have learned in months or weeks what I learned in years. But my point is that it is possible to learn well by yourself, but if you want to survive the experience, be cautious.

Lost Sheep

kingmt
March 30, 2013, 09:22 AM
When I checked them out they were still new. However out still isn't built to be a range gun. It should have a stamp on it that says for emergency use only. Just my opinion.

32_d3gr33s
March 30, 2013, 10:18 AM
Looks like it will be around for a while...
http://www.defensivecarry.com/forum/defensive-carry-guns/117948-ruger-lcr-1200-rounds-counting-long-term-review.html

Lost Sheep
March 31, 2013, 05:48 AM
http://www.handloadersbench.com/forum20/26317.html

Reported to give good flame (as opposed to bad flame?)

Lost Sheep

32_d3gr33s
April 14, 2013, 03:50 AM
Be sure to load that H110 with a mag primer.Alliant powders with a standard primer.
Got my .357/.38 dies a couple days ago. started loading up some rounds (mostly .38's), but wanted to load some of these as well.

Just curious as to why its suggested to use standard pistol as opposed to magnum primers with the 2400? Ive found quite a few people who say 14.5gr pushing a 158gr LSWC with a Magnum primer is perfect... but ive come across just as many who say the standard primer with that load is the way to go. Just interested in some input as to why that is? Ive got thousands of Magnum primers, but just barely over 1000 standard primers, so id love to be able to use up the magnums!

Oh, side note... heres something i feel like belongs in this thread...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8niD-n0lHk

or even a little more relevant:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dTjKsHf9dk

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