Caught myself doing something unsafe again.


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GambJoe
March 30, 2013, 08:26 PM
I decided to check the tightness of the grip screw on my revolver. It felt a little high the last time I used it. I was all ready to tighten it and thought that this wasn't something I should be doing with a loaded gun. Even then it took awhile to convince myself to unload it. My thought process was: it's got a 12 pound spring in it can't go of accidently and I'm not about to pull the trigger on a loaded gun, after all I'm doing is tightening a screw.

I decided to unload it and checked it's condition several times to be sure. I also left the empty cylinder swung open before I tightened the screw. Point- chances are that it wouldn't have never gone off but I reduced those chances to zero by unloading it before attempting a minor repair.

Anyone else cut or think of cutting corners with safety?

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NavyLCDR
March 30, 2013, 08:39 PM
Considering that it takes less than 1 minute to unload a gun, and less than 1 minute to reload it...I don't see any reason not to when the gun comes out of the holster for something other than self defense.

Bill4282
March 30, 2013, 09:00 PM
SAFETY RULE #5 - never put a tool to a loaded gun! Slip of grip or tool could go bang.

Peter Kuykendall
March 30, 2013, 09:23 PM
I'm pretty paranoid about checking before handling a weapon. I never consciously work on a loaded weapon. Mistakes of course can happen, but personally I don't take that kind of shortcut.

jj1962hemi
March 30, 2013, 09:26 PM
I'm with you guys. Unload it and you can take your time and relax.....hopefully not buggering the screws (or someone's head)!

Texan Scott
March 30, 2013, 09:37 PM
@GambJoe :No, don't do that. #HoldMyBeer :neener:

GambJoe
March 30, 2013, 09:40 PM
Glad to hear you guys go by the rules but the point of safety discussions is to make people think safety. You might not touch a firearm with a tool without unloading it, someone like me has to think about it and others would go ahead and break the rule if they know it's a rule or not.

Maybe no one here drinks and messes with guns or plays pranks on friends when they're down range but I bet some did. I'm not trying preach to the choir but I'm trying to get people to discuss safety. And think safety.

GambJoe
March 30, 2013, 09:55 PM
Glad to hear you guys go by the rules but the point of safety discussions is to make people think safety. You might not touch a firearm with a tool without unloading it, someone like me has to think about it and others would go ahead and break the rule if they know it's a rule or not.

Maybe no one here drinks and messes with guns or plays pranks on friends when they're down range but I bet some did. I'm not trying preach to the choir but I'm trying to get people to discuss safety. And think safety.

xxjumbojimboxx
March 30, 2013, 10:19 PM
Guns are dangerous, and people are stupid...

Im not as cautious as I should be... I dry fire in my home alot, I generally don't safety check as I leave only a certain few of my guns loaded (for HD) I would know to unload those... The likelyhood of my forgetting a bullet in a gun is nill, because I clean them right after I use them, and like I said, only certain (three specific) guns stay loaded.

But you neveeerrr know.... I really should do more safety checking, I like to dry fire at poeple on my 65 inch TV for practice sake. Theres nothing behind that tv but brick so im sure my 9mm wouldnt penetrate.... but i sure as hell wouldnt want to poke a hole in the TV :)

jmorris
March 31, 2013, 12:00 AM
It is NOT stupid to check if a gun is unloaded EVER. Even when there is not ammunition for it for miles or any number of other reasons.

It keeps you from being complacent. That is when people get hurt.

Being comfortable or complacent with anything is a bad thing. I know more than a few fellows with one arm, one leg or minus a digit or two that KNEW what they were doing. Not from gun accidents but everyday things some become comfortable with.

Baldy
March 31, 2013, 12:06 AM
Only a fool works on a loaded gun...

Romeo 33 Delta
March 31, 2013, 12:11 AM
The important things was that you "only thought about doing something stupid". The fact that your Guardian Angel whispered in your ear and the fact that YOU LISTENED is what's really important.

We're all human and we all can fall prey to "short-cutting" from time to time ... it's the wise man ... the SAFE GUN OWNER ... who stops ... backs up ... and does it the RIGHT WAY ... the SAFE WAY!

NavyLCDR
March 31, 2013, 12:19 AM
It's usually the unloaded gun that negligently discharges.

ChaoSS
March 31, 2013, 12:27 AM
Some things are good to do just out of habit. Like checking a gun when you first grab it. Sure, you just saw the guy who handed it to you clear it, and you could see that it was clear, but you should do it, just to stay in the habit. You pick up a gun, you clear the gun.

hso
March 31, 2013, 12:36 AM
Anyone else cut or think of cutting corners with safety?


No, and only someone reckless or ignorant of the hazards would cut corners with a loaded gun.

JRH6856
March 31, 2013, 12:43 AM
When I work on any of my guns, the last thing I do before putting them away is dry fire to make sure that nothing I have done has compromised the main function of the weapon. Knowing that I am going to do that, I always unload first before doing anything else. Even something as simple as just checking a grip screw will inevitably lead to me doing something else and eventually pulling the trigger.

I had an ND over 30 years ago because I failed to unload before tightening a screw on a loaded gun. I haven't had another since. I ALWAYS check clear when I pick up any gun, and I find myself constantly checking the chambers while I am working on one.

Agsalaska
March 31, 2013, 12:50 AM
Yea man thats a pretty big problem you need to deal with. I could not imagine working on a loaded gun. It wouldn't even cross my mind. I would not normally preach to you but, since you asked, you probably need to take a hard look at all of your gun practices. If you are willing to work on a loaded gun who knows what else you do. Please understand that I say that out of concern, not ridicule. Trust me I learned some hard lessons. It should not have been a question.

thump_rrr
March 31, 2013, 03:49 AM
Any gun I pick up is checked to be clear by me.
If I hand the cleared gun to somebody I insist they check it for themselves.
When it is handed back to me I check it over once again.
It only takes a few seconds each time.
Even though it has been checked to be clear it is still handled as if it were loaded.
Never pointing it at anything I wouldn't want destroyed etc.
When dry firing I point to a corner of my room where I know there is piece of 4" thick wood with a concrete foundation behind it.

HenryRifle
March 31, 2013, 10:15 AM
I couldn't agree more on checking/clearing a weapon every time you touch it. After awhile, it does become habilt and I believe is one of the better ones to have. (Although certainly all of the safety rules need to be adhered to).

I'd like to add that If someone is showing you a firearm with an action you are not familiar with, ask them to show you how to check it before they hand it to you. I personally believe if you can't check the condition (loaded/unloaded), you shouldn't handle the weapon until more training has taken place.

Racinfan83
March 31, 2013, 11:10 AM
I couldn't agree more on checking/clearing a weapon every time you touch it. After awhile, it does become habilt and I believe is one of the better ones to have. (Although certainly all of the safety rules need to be adhered to).

I'd like to add that If someone is showing you a firearm with an action you are not familiar with, ask them to show you how to check it before they hand it to you. I personally believe if you can't check the condition (loaded/unloaded), you shouldn't handle the weapon until more training has taken place.

EXACTLY! I was taught to always immediately check any firearm to make sure it is unloaded the second you pick it up. (unless actively hunting or shooting of course) I tought both my kids at a young age how to check any type of firearm - and that they always check any gun they touch. Never had a problem with them being "curious" either. And if they were - at least I knew they knew how to check and clear the gun. My son actually caught me in a "mess up" once - I had shot my AR and thought I had emptied it out. Left one in the chamber. But sure as I had tought him - he got the gun out for something, immediately pulled the bolt back to check it, and a live round flipped out on the floor. :eek: I was horrified that I had neglected to clear one of my "unloaded" guns - but happy and proud at the same time that my teachings had worked to perfection.
We are all human, we all make mistakes. So always make sure SAFETY FIRST when handling any gun!

holdencm9
March 31, 2013, 02:21 PM
Unless a gun is in a holster, in which case it never leaves the holster...clearing is always the first thing I do.

Otherwise, removing the mag and clearing the firearm, or popping out the cylinder on a revolver, is the first thing I do anytime I touch any firearm, period. It doesn't matter if it is mine, a friend's, or a gun at the store. It's pretty much second-nature.

Have you ever cleared a gun, even after someone else just did, and had them get upset at you for not trusting them? Or call you an idiot? No. But if you have a ND you can be sure you'll be calling yourself one for a looong time.

oldbear
March 31, 2013, 05:51 PM
A stupid mistake only takes a second, yet the results of a gun shoot wound are life changing. Always check every weapon for live ammo before you handle it.

MedWheeler
March 31, 2013, 07:37 PM
zzjumbojimboxx writes:

Idry fire in my home alot [sic], I generally don't safety check as I leave only a certain few of my guns loaded (for HD) I would know to unload those...

This is how I had the only unintended discharge I've ever had. Came from a gun I "knew" I never stored loaded. Technically, the firing chamber was empty, but the magazine was not. Racked it for a dry-fire and... well, it was pointed deliberately in a safe direction.

RobNDenver
March 31, 2013, 08:29 PM
Glad to hear you guys go by the rules but the point of safety discussions is to make people think safety. You might not touch a firearm with a tool without unloading it, someone like me has to think about it and others would go ahead and break the rule if they know it's a rule or not.

Maybe no one here drinks and messes with guns or plays pranks on friends when they're down range but I bet some did. I'm not trying preach to the choir but I'm trying to get people to discuss safety. And think safety.
Ok, just so you know, I never touch a firearm after I have a drink. I don't play with guns on the range, and I damn sure don't fool with a gun that is loaded. All of my guns are loaded all the time, and I damn sure don't need to check them, until I don't want them to be loaded. The closest I have ever come to what you suggest is clearing a stoppage. I am a pr&$&k about gun safety because you only have to make one mistake.

Hardtarget
March 31, 2013, 11:34 PM
My nephew made a comment one day while we were talking about gun safety.

Quote: "don't get so busy knowing what you do that you forget to do what you know"

I'm very close to my 63rd birthday. I've been hunting/shooting almost 50 yrs. I run that through my head every time I go hunting, start a reloading session, or just pick up a gun. I'm trying to keep safety on the front burner of my brain.

Mark

Drail
April 1, 2013, 12:05 AM
In every gun shop I worked at (or in my own shop) Rule NO. 1 was always - there will be NO live ammo in the shop at any time. Anywhere in the shop. Ever. It's just too easy for someone to grab what they "think" is a snap cap to check a function and shoot someone. It has happened many more times than you would think. If tools and guns in are the same room - unload it BEFORE you even enter the work area. There are a number of handguns in fairly common use that have linkage parts for the trigger on the outside of the frame. (Beretta for one) Just bumping it with a screwdriver or punch in a specific place can release the sear. If the gun is loaded it will fire.

Krogen
April 1, 2013, 12:24 AM
Similar to working on a loaded gun: photos of loaded guns. People offering guns for sale or posting photos in various forums often show the guns or magazines loaded. It "seems" unsafe. Quite possibly they're arranging the gun for photos, neglecting safety and concentrating on photography. It's likely they're covering themselves with the muzzle. For me, a loaded gun needs my full concentrated attention or needs to be stowed safely. Photographs of loaded guns just reek of sloppy, amateurish gun handling.

Romeo 33 Delta
April 1, 2013, 12:57 AM
Drail ... my reloading/workshop rules is that NO LIVE AMMO IN ANY FIREARM!

I have dummys for all the calibers I load, with all the different bullets I currently use. They are what I use for checking function (or setting up a die if I've changed it).

Now I don't see how I could have an accident if I'm being careful with live ammo ... but it takes only once and it's just not worth the risk.

balderclev
April 1, 2013, 02:07 AM
+1 to a lot of these posts.

Always check a weapon when it is in my hands regardless if it is mine or someone else's.

Tubular mags are notorious. Take out the rod and empty, put rod back in, close the action, BETTER open and make sure you see the lead on the rod spring and no chambered round! You cannot depend on the spring in a tubular magazine to always clear the magazine.

Flopsweat
April 1, 2013, 03:20 PM
It's usually the unloaded gun that negligently discharges.

This is exactly what I tell my students. I also tell them the next time they read about one of these instances, count how many rules were broken. It's almost always more than one, or it wouldn't have made the news. Often it's all of them.

xxjumbojimboxx
April 2, 2013, 12:12 AM
I'm almost kind of shocked at the level of which poeple wont admit theyve made mistakes... I understand. Firearms are amazingly dangerous, and should be treated as such, but the original poster asked, in different words, who else has made a stupid mistake? I find it hard to believe that were all boy scouts in here... I know I'm not. I ABSOLUTLY make sure to follow one rule. And that is to make sure the barrel of any gun is always pointed in a safe direction. Ive never had any AD's either... I think if you ALWAYS follow that specific rule, as well as locking up idle firearms... the rest is just , well, boy scout-ish...

Oh jeez, im probably going to get some flak for this one. :neener:

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