What's the dirt on dirt-proof folders?


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SleazyRider
April 1, 2013, 09:46 AM
I find myself in a lot of dirty places during the day, and I don't mean adult bookstores. Sheet rock dust, sand, sawdust, and just plain ol' dirt find their way into my pockets, and eventually into my knife. And it drives me up a wall when opening/closing my knife has a gritty feel. Yes, sometimes my pockets have flaps, but it doesn't seem to make much difference---the dirt finds its way in there.

So, can anybody suggest a folding pocket knife---preferably an assisted-opener---that they've found to be a little more "dirt-resistant" that the others? I understand it's the nature of the beast to attract dirt, but I've also found that certain folders---my Kershaw, for example---can go a bit further than my SOG before I have to break out the air compressor or dental floss and clean their innards. Which folding knife can get down 'n dirty and keep on tickin'?

I'd appreciate your thoughts on this!

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JShirley
April 1, 2013, 09:57 AM
For higher grit areas, I'd suggest NOT getting an AO.

SleazyRider
April 1, 2013, 10:11 AM
For higher grit areas, I'd suggest NOT getting an AO.
You're right, of course, but since the advent of the assisted-opener I've become spoiled. For so many tasks, I find my left hand busy, and reaching into my right pocket and grabbing a one-hand opening knife has been a real convenience. Is there a one-hand opener that is not necessarily a spring-assisted opener?

JShirley
April 1, 2013, 10:35 AM
Sure. Spyderco pioneered the one-handed knife in 1981. Any Spyderco "Clipit" will have a clip to hold it in place on your pocket or waistline, and except for well-noted exceptions, will have a round hole to catch with a digit, and a sturdy lock.

I think you'll find Caged Ball Bearing Lock models (such as Manix 2) especially easy to clean. The new Manix 2 Black Lightweight will be a knife you can quickly blast away dust with compressed air, or just quickly "swish" in soapy water, rinse, and dry.
http://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=797

John

dayhiker
April 1, 2013, 11:02 AM
For an assisted my Zero Tolerance 0301 is pretty open and easy to blow out.

http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/100_1926_zps6e34b6ce.jpg


http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/100_1925_zpscf828378.jpg

For higher grit areas, I'd suggest NOT getting an AO.


Got to agree....And I can open my non-assisted ZT0550 a little faster than my 0301. Without wrist flicking.

0550....on bottom, 0301 on top.

http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/100_1928_zps40b34f31.jpg


http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/100_1927_zpscc5d1ad6.jpg


Open design works great with blowing out with a compressor..

http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/002472x800_zpsf2836699.jpg

JShirley
April 1, 2013, 12:26 PM
Thanks for the great pictures, dayhiker.

After looking at my Manix 2s, I'm going to take back my suggestion of the Lightweight Manix 2s. The lock and basic construction are easy to clean- and I experienced no problems using it in the high-grit areas of Afghanistan- but the regular (G10) Manix 2s have open construction. The Lightweight Manix 2s have a spacer on the spine side of the handle, needing additional FRCP since they don't have steel liners. The lightweight Manix 2s will therefore be a little harder to clean as thoroughly.

Here is a Manix 2 XL and a Lightweight Translucent Manix 2. The Lightweight Black's construction will be similar, except for handle color.

John

rcmodel
April 1, 2013, 12:47 PM
I would not overlook the Benchmade Axis Locks either.

They don't come any more one-hand friendly.

I have never seen any evidence they are prone to dust or dirt making them feel gritty.

Unlike all liner-locks, nothing touches the blade when they are released to close them.

rc

Certaindeaf
April 1, 2013, 01:24 PM
A Skilsaw gets "dust" on it at a jobsite for heavens sake.. go figure. lolz. Sometimes you have to monitor/maintain your tools. If you drop it in concrete, you might have to wash it off etc. you can do it!

SleazyRider
April 1, 2013, 01:39 PM
A Skilsaw gets "dust" on it at a jobsite for heavens sake.. go figure. lolz. Sometimes you have to monitor/maintain your tools. If you drop it in concrete, you might have to wash it off etc. you can do it!
Yes, which is one reason the bearings are sealed. Perhaps that's the answer: a knife with a pair of o-rings to protect the blade pivot, recessed in a purchase cut into both sides of the blade. What I'm thinking of is similar to an o-ring motorcycle chain, which retains lubrication and keeps dirt out of the pivots.

Thanks for the knife pics. They certainly look more open than I'm used to seeing, and seem to lend themselves to quick cleaning.

hso
April 1, 2013, 02:09 PM
There are several knives using washers on their pivots that may help keep grit out of the pivot. Look for any folder with nylon, teflon, or bronze washers.

Manual openers like the Spyderco Sage II Ti and the waved Endura and Delicas, CRKT Shenanigan Aluminum and Lake Thunderbolt, ... are out there with washers that help keep grit out.

dayhiker
April 1, 2013, 02:29 PM
What I'm thinking of is similar to an o-ring motorcycle chain, which retains lubrication and keeps dirt out of the pivots.


Look for any folder with nylon, teflon, or bronze washers.

Yep.....a little out of focus. But you can see the bronze washers.

http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/h340/dayhiker1968/004586x640_zps3b8ae425.jpg

zhyla
April 2, 2013, 02:51 PM
Looking at my (G10) Manix 2, I'm not so sure it's a great design for dealing with drywall dust. There's gaps between the liners and the blade, perfect place for dust to get in and difficult to get out. The washer design above looks a little better. Lower-end designs where the blade and the liners are flush may be better.

Really seems like a job for a small fixed-blade though. I love folders but if you're going into the muck you wanted something with no moving parts.

SleazyRider
April 2, 2013, 10:20 PM
Yes, muck indeed. Fixed blades are not an option here: http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2013/02/the-tunnels-of-nycs-east-side-access-project/100462/

Bix
April 3, 2013, 11:57 AM
Manual openers like the Spyderco Sage II Ti and the waved Endura and Delicas, CRKT Shenanigan Aluminum and Lake Thunderbolt, ... are out there with washers that help keep grit out.

Note that the screw construction on the Gen 4 delica / endura models allows you to disassemble for cleaning, as well. I've had a few occasions where my Endura or trainer got dirty enough that disassembly was warranted. Spyderco even sells a parts kit for when you loose the washers in the process :)

SleazyRider
April 3, 2013, 01:21 PM
I tried disassembling my SOG Blink for cleaning. What a nightmare! There were ball detents and springs the size of a grain of rice. Had to send it back to SOG who, to their credit, reassembled it for free.

Bix
April 3, 2013, 03:32 PM
The Endura and Endura trainer come apart fairly easily and don't have many parts. There are numerous tutorials online that walk through the process. I'm not especially handy and have no problems with it.

Tirod
April 4, 2013, 02:15 PM
A knife is going to have dust and dirt thrown at it. The real issue is, will it stick? My new Benchmade Risk was shipped with some oil on it, and presently collects lint worse than a dryer trap. It simply needs to be degreased - non chlorinated brake cleaner being one simple and cheap method. Then, not hosing it down in some other oily or otherwise attractive substance. It just makes the problem come back.

That's the issue - applying more of something that makes dust and dirt stick. It would be better to apply something that reduces it. Like aluminum alloy wheel treatments. If the black goo from cheap disc brake pads won't stick, then everyday dirt and dust won't do well, either.

The knives I've cleaned and left dry collect much less muck. A stainless knife with stainless or titanium liners and synthetic grips of whatever composition doesn't need much in the way of lube, and a hot water rinse disposes of what does stick.

rcmodel
April 5, 2013, 02:02 AM
Λ Λ Λ Λ
What he said.
A dry knife is a clean dust-free knife.

And any modern knife made of modern materials can be a dry knife and survive quite nicely.

If you need lube?
Use powdered lock graphite, or Remington Dry-Lube spray.

As far as cleaning a folder in a NYC under-ground tunnel operation??

Don't yous guys have air compressors with blow nozzles fairly close at hand to blow the tunnel sand off yous Gyro clam sandwiches before lunch???? :D

PS: Just joking you!
What does an old Kansas farm boy know about NYC?
Except the time I was there on a weekend pass for the 1964 Worlds Fair while going through Basic at Ft. Dix NJ.

That weekend scared me enough, I ain't never been back!! :what:

rc

lemaymiami
April 5, 2013, 12:00 PM
Funny how everyone has different approaches to keeping their tools in good working condition. My folder is exposed to serious saltwater corrosion (understatement) along with the usual dust/dirt from riding inside a front pants pocket at all times. My solution is to periodically open the blade and run the entire knife under a strong hot water stream while opening and closing it repeatedly to exercise spring, lock, and hinge. Works like a charm, the tool is then carefully dried off (including a cloth or paper towel folded up around a small slot bladed screwdriver that's run up and down every portion of the slot that blade, spring, etc rest in). Once I'm satisfied that the knife is clean and dry then a tiny drop or two of fine gun oil (Gunslik or Break Free) for hinge, spring, and blade then every last bit of it removed with a soft cloth and you're ready to go.... My current EDC is a full sized Benchmade Ascent, in the past it's been AlMar Eagle, Cold Steel push blade, and others. All have survived corrosion and other hard use issues if I don't lose them...

SleazyRider
April 5, 2013, 09:49 PM
Λ Λ Λ Λ
What he said.
A dry knife is a clean dust-free knife.

And any modern knife made of modern materials can be a dry knife and survive quite nicely.

If you need lube?
Use powdered lock graphite, or Remington Dry-Lube spray.

As far as cleaning a folder in a NYC under-ground tunnel operation??

Don't yous guys have air compressors with blow nozzles fairly close at hand to blow the tunnel sand off yous Gyro clam sandwiches before lunch???? :D

PS: Just joking you!
What does an old Kansas farm boy know about NYC?
Except the time I was there on a weekend pass for the 1964 Worlds Fair while going through Basic at Ft. Dix NJ.

That weekend scared me enough, I ain't never been back!! :what:

rc
Hey, RC, I was at the '64 World's Fair myself---but I was just a little kid! :D (The Unisphere was restored a few years ago, and it's still there in Flushing) But things have improved a great deal since 1964, and I assure you that the city is a safe and thoroughly enjoyable place to visit.
I see you're in eastern Kansas, and it might seem strange to you that this ol' city slicker has spent a great deal of time traipsing around in the Flint Hills. I love the openness, and I understand completely why NYC feels so confining---it is for me as well.

I'l be in Denver for a convention during the first week of May, and I plan to drop in at the Spyderco Factory outlet in Golden. I think I'll pick up an Endura, and do my best to keep it clean and dry.

Gyros? Faggetabouit ... we eat pizza, the best in the woild!

rcmodel
April 6, 2013, 11:59 AM
That sounds like the plan!!

You will love the Spyderco I betcha!

rc

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