.22WRF rifle identification/value


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jschneider93
April 4, 2013, 09:51 PM
Hello,
I'd like to get some help identifying my Stevens Buckhorn chambered in .22wrf.

I'm not even sure of the exact model, but it does say Stevens Buckhorn Rifle on the bottom of the barrel just infront of the stock. It's a single shot, and has .22wrf on the left side of the barrel just below the sight. It has a brass bead front sight. It's a takedown rifle with one big screw on the bottom to take the stock off. On top of the barrel just infront of the sight, it says "J. Stevens Arms Company." and just below that, it says "Chiocopee Falls Mass. U.S.A.". At the back of the barrel on the left side, if says "14" in a circle. On the bottom side of the bolt handle where it meets the bolt, it also says ".22WRF". That, combined with the fact that the patina is even on the barrel and receiver makes me believe that this the rifle came in this configuration from the factory, and wasn't re-barreled for .22wrf. I thought that maybe it could have been re-barreled, at first, because I couldn't find any info on a Stevens single shot in .22wrf, save for someone on another forum saying he had one.

I'd like to know if this was a standard configuration for a Stevens Buckhorn, or if it was something that had to be custom ordered? I ask this, because that's what someone on the forum with the other guy with one in .22wrf suggested, and I can't find a single other one.

As far as condition to determine value, the metal all has what I consider a nice darkish patina. The bolt looks chromed, but much of the chrome is worn off, especially on the bolt handle. Bore looks great. No cracks in buttplate. Stock is a pretty wood, with some scratches and dents, but they seem old, as they are dark in color. There are some drops of cream colored paint in a couple places. There is a long crack along the stock starting at the front on the left side, going about 8 or 10 inches back. Also, the wood, and the metal look a good bit lighter in the pics than they really are.

I'd like to know how which model this is, how old it is, and a value, if possible. Is it worth less than 100 like a regular single shot in .22LR, or closer to the value of the .22wrf Winchester 1890? Or maybe in between the value of a .22LR single shot and a .22WMR single shot?

Thanks in advance,
-Jake

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jschneider93
April 4, 2013, 09:52 PM
Pics

jschneider93
April 4, 2013, 09:54 PM
Pics 2

rcmodel
April 4, 2013, 10:10 PM
Or maybe in between the value of a .22LR single shot and a .22WMR single shot?Maybe that.

It certainly is not worth as much as a 1890 Winchester .22 WRF in like condition.

And it isn't worth as much to a shooter as a .22 LR chambered .22 RF you used to be able to buy ammo at Walmart for.

And it appears the stock has been sanded and refinished with high gloss bar top finish leaving the scratches & cracks under the finish?

So?

Either find a Steven collector with low standards willing to pay top dollar for a refinished relatively rare rifle?

(There are only two Stevens collectors known to be still alive in the USA, and they both have higher standards) :D

Or figure it is a $100-$150 buck rifle, if it still works and shoots good.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but that is what I see in the photos.

rc

jschneider93
April 4, 2013, 10:37 PM
Thanks for your quick response. That's kind of what I figured. I'm happy with that, though. I only spent $100 on it, and I was considering buying a more powerful rimfire than a .22LR, and a .22WMR or a .17HMR would have cost a lot more than that.

I'll be testing it on Saturday, so we'll see how she does.

Have any idea of which Buckhorn model it is?

rcmodel
April 4, 2013, 10:53 PM
No, sorry.
I'm not up on the Buckhorn model at all.

I am up on the .22 WRF though.

I have an 1890.
And I have old & new ammo.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/22WRFAmmo_zpsfa79c18b.jpg

The old ammo from the 1930's, 40's, and 50's barks & bites almost like a .22 Magnum.

Todays ammo from Winchester & CCI is downloaded to about .22 LR standard velocity performance.

Bottom line is, Find some old ammo priced so you can shoot some of it.
Even if just once!!!

Only then can you truly apprecite what the .22 WRF was all about way back in the late 1800's when it came out.

rc

jschneider93
April 4, 2013, 11:16 PM
No, sorry.
I'm not up on the Buckhorn model at all.

I am up on the .22 WRF though.

I have an 1890.
And I have old & new ammo.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/22WRFAmmo_zpsfa79c18b.jpg

The old ammo from the 1930's, 40's, and 50's barks & bites almost like a .22 Magnum.

Todays ammo from Winchester & CCI is downloaded to about .22 LR standard velocity performance.

Bottom line is, Find some old ammo priced so you can shoot some of it.
Even if just once!!!

Only then can you truly apprecite what the .22 WRF was all about way back in the late 1800's when it came out.

rc
Wow. I didn't know that. I'll keep an eye out for it.

So it looks like you prefer the new Winchester to the CCI? I picked up two boxes of CCI, and haven't seen any Winchester around.

Also, do you buy online when the companies make a run of it? Or just buy it as you see it in person? Because I can't hardly find any locally, and I think Midway's website says they should have it back in stock 6/26/2013, and I might just buy a bunch unless I see some in stores.

303tom
April 4, 2013, 11:20 PM
Hello,
I'd like to get some help identifying my Stevens Buckhorn chambered in .22wrf.

I'm not even sure of the exact model, but it does say Stevens Buckhorn Rifle on the bottom of the barrel just infront of the stock. It's a single shot, and has .22wrf on the left side of the barrel just below the sight. It has a brass bead front sight. It's a takedown rifle with one big screw on the bottom to take the stock off. On top of the barrel just infront of the sight, it says "J. Stevens Arms Company." and just below that, it says "Chiocopee Falls Mass. U.S.A.". At the back of the barrel on the left side, if says "14" in a circle. On the bottom side of the bolt handle where it meets the bolt, it also says ".22WRF". That, combined with the fact that the patina is even on the barrel and receiver makes me believe that this the rifle came in this configuration from the factory, and wasn't re-barreled for .22wrf. I thought that maybe it could have been re-barreled, at first, because I couldn't find any info on a Stevens single shot in .22wrf, save for someone on another forum saying he had one.

I'd like to know if this was a standard configuration for a Stevens Buckhorn, or if it was something that had to be custom ordered? I ask this, because that's what someone on the forum with the other guy with one in .22wrf suggested, and I can't find a single other one.

As far as condition to determine value, the metal all has what I consider a nice darkish patina. The bolt looks chromed, but much of the chrome is worn off, especially on the bolt handle. Bore looks great. No cracks in buttplate. Stock is a pretty wood, with some scratches and dents, but they seem old, as they are dark in color. There are some drops of cream colored paint in a couple places. There is a long crack along the stock starting at the front on the left side, going about 8 or 10 inches back. Also, the wood, and the metal look a good bit lighter in the pics than they really are.

I'd like to know how which model this is, how old it is, and a value, if possible. Is it worth less than 100 like a regular single shot in .22LR, or closer to the value of the .22wrf Winchester 1890? Or maybe in between the value of a .22LR single shot and a .22WMR single shot?

Thanks in advance,
-Jake
It`s a Stevens Model 55.......................

rcmodel
April 4, 2013, 11:42 PM
So it looks like you prefer the new Winchester to the CCI?No, actually, I think I prefer the CCI.

But there isn't a whole lot of difference.
They are both pretty anemic compared to what could have been.

I just fell into a real deal on a couple of bricks of the Winchester the last time they made some.

rc

jschneider93
April 5, 2013, 12:00 AM
It`s a Stevens Model 55.......................
Okay, thanks. Do you know if the .22WRF was a regular option, or did it have to be custom ordered?

Jim K
April 5, 2013, 02:25 PM
The Stevens Buckhorn was the Model 53 or O53. You have the former, the latter has a rear peep sight. I can't find any record that they were made in .22 WRF, but many times companies produce special runs that are never cataloged.

In any case, they were a low-priced boys rifle, introduced in 1935.

Jim

jschneider93
April 5, 2013, 03:22 PM
The Stevens Buckhorn was the Model 53 or O53. You have the former, the latter has a rear peep sight. I can't find any record that they were made in .22 WRF, but many times companies produce special runs that are never cataloged.

In any case, they were a low-priced boys rifle, introduced in 1935.

Jim
That's what the person on the other forum thought his was, the 53. What makes mine the 53, and not the 55 like someone else on here suggested?

And if it were a special run gun, it wouldn't really be worth more for that reason, would it?

Jim K
April 5, 2013, 10:57 PM
Going by Phil Sharpe, who was writing in 1938 when those guns were still current production, yours is a Model 53. The Model 55 was very similar but the bolt handle turned down into a notch in the receiver instead of ahead of the receiver ring like yours.

I honestly don't think your gun has any special value because of the chambering. As rcmodel says, Stevens collectors are thin on the ground, and mostly interested in the old falling block rifles rather than the bolt action models.

Jim

Ron James
April 6, 2013, 12:01 AM
Just a little OT, A few months ago I was able to pick up Sharp's " Rifles in America " The NRA reprint at a small used book store, 8 dollars and tax. A boo-tee-full hard bound book in new condition. Very interesting read.:)

Jim Watson
April 6, 2013, 06:12 AM
There was a whole series of Stevens Buckhorn rifles, single shot, box mag, tube mag, and semiauto. They had the deluxe black (painted) foreend tip and cost about a dollar more than the plain versions.

In the 1939 Stoegers catalogue, the Model 53 was available in .22 LR, .22 WRF, and .25 Stevens for $5.70.
$6.45 got you the Model 053 with peep and globe sights.
$10.45 would buy the Model 53T with scope sight but only in .22 LR.

Prices were no less than similar Winchesters, $5.65 for a Model 67, $6.40 for a Model 68 with less refined peep sight.

Carl N. Brown
April 6, 2013, 06:31 AM
Adjusted for inflation 1939 $5.70 would be 2013 $94.08.

Still not a bad price for a bolt action hunting or "garden gun".

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