How do you prefer to carry extra revolver ammo, a speed strip or a speed loader?


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vito
April 5, 2013, 06:22 PM
I guess it would be worth practicing reloading any revolver that is used for concealed carry, but I wonder what most folks use, a strip or a speed loader? The strip seems much easier to actually carry, but it appears that a speed loader is quicker to use. And I also wonder what percentage of folks who carry a revolver have ANY type of additional load with them routinely, or do they count on the 5 or 6 rounds to be enough?

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Naybor
April 5, 2013, 06:54 PM
If I use our .357 Ruger SP101

Two Speed Loaders.

If I use our LCP

One extra magazine

leadcounsel
April 5, 2013, 06:57 PM
Speed strip. Slim and affordable.

Admittedly a speed loader may be faster but with training both are fast enough.

I rarely carry a revolver anymore. I'm much better with a semi auto.

Sergei Mosin
April 5, 2013, 07:00 PM
I carry one of each with my GP100. The first reload I would go to is the speedloader. With my LCR, which is pocket carry only, I carry only a strip.

beatledog7
April 5, 2013, 07:10 PM
It depends on what I'm doing/wearing. If urban, or I'm wearing dress clothes, a strip. If rural, or I'm wearing jeans/khakis, maybe speed loaders. If open carry, then definitely speed loaders.

9mmepiphany
April 5, 2013, 07:55 PM
Speed Strip are much easier to carry, but Speedloaders are 3 times as fast...so you get to choose what you value more.

Be aware that you'll more likely need to reload if you carry a revolver than a pistol. You don't want to be asking yourself, "How many rounds have I fired?" after the initial exchange

Mango88
April 5, 2013, 08:50 PM
For ccw I carry a speed strip as it conceals easier and I can load less than an entire cylinder full if I need to. Its hard to top off with a speed loader. If I'm carrying a single action of any sort I have a couple of belt slides with cartridge loops that I use, they would even work for ccw purposes.

OptimusPrime
April 5, 2013, 08:57 PM
I've been carrying my snubbie 357 more and more lately, and I rely on the 7 rounds to be enough. I just never seem to get around to grabbing extra rounds for it. I don't feel under-gunned.

wheelyfun66
April 5, 2013, 09:12 PM
Speed strips.

much slimmer, and I do not plan on doing a speed re-load during some heated gunfight!
I do carry spare ammo, just so that I could top off after a shooting incident, in case of secondary threats.

sixgunner455
April 5, 2013, 09:15 PM
A speedstrip. Or two. Or three. Whenever I'm carrying the snubbie in my pocket, I rarely carry a speedloader, though I have one for it, but I always have at least one reload on me, and frequently more. They're small and light, so why not?

Revolver on the belt? A speed strip in a pocket, and at least a couple of speedloaders, too. Speedstrip for topping off, speedloaders for filling it fast.

Waywatcher
April 5, 2013, 09:31 PM
This sounds sounds positively old fashioned, but I will carry my reload in a Galco 2x2x2.

So, neither of the above.

leadcounsel
April 5, 2013, 09:41 PM
Also, imagining a situation where you fire a few rounds and take cover, with a speed strip it is easier to peel off 3 rounds and open the cylinder and reload just the three spend shells.

And a speed strip lays flat and takes up 1/2 the space. So you could carry 2, maybe 3 speed strips in the same space as a single loaded reloader.

Dave T
April 5, 2013, 10:10 PM
My favorite way to carry ammo is in a full moon clip. I have several 45 ACP revolvers that just love to gobble up moon clips.

Also have a couple 7-shot L-frames that are cut for moon clips and that's my preferred reloading method. With the 357s I sometimes back up the moon clips with a seven round speed strip.

Dave

9mmepiphany
April 5, 2013, 11:31 PM
Also, imagining a situation where you fire a few rounds and take cover, with a speed strip it is easier to peel off 3 rounds and open the cylinder and reload just the three spend shells.
Have you ever tried that under any pressure/stress?

We did in the academy, when they demonstrated to us why we shouldn't do it...we had guys with combinations of speed strips in dump pouches or leather loops (I regret that we did have the 2x2x2 then).

Before you can reload a partially expended cylinder, you have to pick out just the fired shells...which are going to stick in the chambers as they have expanded...leaving the unfired cartridges in place. With just a bit of pressure, you can partially push on the ejector rod and release it...this rises all the cartridges and allows the unfired ones to fall back down...then you can pluck out the empty cases. Now imagine doing that under stress and not just pushing the ejector rod all the way...allowing a case to fall under the ejector star and jamming the whole revolver. It is like a double feed jam in a pistol and is just as hard to clear

It is actually easier, and faster, to dump the unfired cartridges into your hand, eject the fired cases on the ground and reload the cartridges in your hand...then add new cartridges.

Much like a pistol, it is faster and more reliable to completely unload and reload with fresh ammo

bannockburn
April 6, 2013, 12:10 AM
I use to practice and carry speedstrips for my Charter Arms Undercover. Even though I was never all that quick to begin with I eventually got better over time with the reloads. Then I started using speedloaders and it made enough of a difference time-wise that when I'm carrying my Model 638 I take a speedloader along with me.

Feanaro
April 6, 2013, 02:06 AM
Safariland speedloaders when available, HKS if not. No speed strips, thanks.

Speed strips are conveniently sized. That's about the only advantage. I'd rather have the speedloader because if six rounds aren't enough, I probably need the next six real, real quick.

As 9mmepiphany pointed out, if you want a partial reload you can just dump the good cartridges in hand, eject the rest and stuff all the pipes with a speedloader. You still come out ahead on speed. The only advantage I can see to the speed strip partial reload is that you keep all your ammo either in the revolver or in a "reloading device", rather than having it loose. I don't find this to be a compelling advantage, because I think it far more likely I will be faced with an empty revolver and a pressing need for more boom now than to find myself with a half empty revolver and a lull in the "action" with which to make a partial reload.

There's also the idea that you can get two rounds into the revolver quickly with the speed strip but I'd be willing to bet that in the same time you could have reloaded all six chambers with a speedloader.

The speed strip you have with you is better than the speedloader you leave at home... but it's better to have the speedloader.

leadcounsel
April 6, 2013, 02:14 AM
9mmephiphany said:
Before you can reload a partially expended cylinder, you have to pick out just the fired shells...which are going to stick in the chambers as they have expanded...leaving the unfired cartridges in place. With just a bit of pressure, you can partially push on the ejector rod and release it...this rises all the cartridges and allows the unfired ones to fall back down...then you can pluck out the empty cases. Now imagine doing that under stress and not just pushing the ejector rod all the way...allowing a case to fall under the ejector star and jamming the whole revolver. It is like a double feed jam in a pistol and is just as hard to clear

It is actually easier, and faster, to dump the unfired cartridges into your hand, eject the fired cases on the ground and reload the cartridges in your hand...then add new cartridges.


I've never trained like this, and that is very smart training technique. Thank you for sharing.

GRIZ22
April 6, 2013, 02:25 AM
A speed loader and a 2x2x2 pouch. Speed loader for complete reload, pouch for partial.

9mmepiphany
April 6, 2013, 03:04 AM
Safariland speedloaders when available, HKS if not. No speed strips, thanks.
Those are my preferences too...I'd even be tempted to get 5-Star speedloaders before HKS, because they rotate, to release, in the correct direction (into the window)


The only advantage I can see to the speed strip partial reload is that you keep all your ammo either in the revolver or in a "reloading device", rather than having it loose.
This is what my experience has shown also

There's also the idea that you can get two rounds into the revolver quickly with the speed strip but I'd be willing to bet that in the same time you could have reloaded all six chambers with a speedloader.
Yup, a speed loader will load 6 just as fast, if not faster (one less motion) as you can load 2 with a speed strip.

If you really wanted to just load 2, a 2x2x2 holder is also faster (also one less motion)

IlikeSA
April 6, 2013, 10:40 AM
An SKS clip conveniently carries 10 rounds of 38 or 357. That said, I carry 2 speedloaders.

Derry 1946
April 6, 2013, 11:17 AM
Usually rely on the 6 in the cylinder in my standard 38 sp.(DS). If I think I will need more, I carry either a second revolver in the same caliber, or switch to .45 APC with full moon clips. The .45 (1917) isn't conducive to deep concealment in warmer weather, but it is easy to reload. The plastic moon clips from Rimz are excellent.

L-Frame
April 6, 2013, 11:36 AM
My 3" GP-100 with 1 safariland Comp II speedloader. I find it do be comfortable, fast, and it's what works best for me. No speed strips or HKS's for me.

MountainBear
April 6, 2013, 12:48 PM
Speed strip, strong side pocket.

jdh
April 6, 2013, 01:06 PM
"If I think I will need more"

Clairvoyance is a wonderful trait that would be nice to have. Since I don't I'll stick with the It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it principle.

Speed loaders. If I just need to top off I can twist the knob on the speed loader while is is still in my pocket to release the cartridges and remove what I need to complete the Tactical reload.

If I could just manage to find a 5 shot Centennial type in 41 mag for my back up.

Hondo 60
April 6, 2013, 04:32 PM
None of the above.
I carry one revolver.
If I need more, I don't think a reload will help.
I'll just bend over & kiss my behind goodbye.

JERRY
April 6, 2013, 05:03 PM
if i carry my J frames it is two at a time. if its one of my other revolvers its with Safariland Comp speed loaders.

that said ive resigned myself to carry my department issued G17 to make things more simple. but if i make it to retirement my ccw guns will rotate.

Derry 1946
April 7, 2013, 10:53 AM
"If I think I will need more"

Clairvoyance is a wonderful trait that would be nice to have.

I prefer to call it Precognitive Situational Awareness. ;-)

PedalBiker
April 7, 2013, 11:10 AM
I prefer to have it in a speed loader, but only if I have a suitable pocket (carpenter jeans) otherwise it's in a strip, which is most of the time.

Fiv3r
April 7, 2013, 01:08 PM
Depends on what I'm wearing. If it's jacket weather, then a speed loader in my pocket is easy enough. If I'm not wearing a jacket, then I just use a couple of dump pouches.

Actually, neither is for dedicated self-defense. I just like to carry other rounds for my gun that I might need. When I bum around the woods, I usually stoke my Blackhawk will hottish .357 and carry a pouch of .38 with me for plinking. Obviously a speed loader wouldn't be all that speedy for THAT gun in question;) However, even carrying a double action .357, I don't really worry too much about a fast reload.

5 or 6 shots with 6 more available is better than nothing. I could carry 4 or 5 speedloaders. Or I could just carry a semi-auto, or I guess I could just sling my AR over my shoulder and vest up with 5 or 6 30 round mags...just in case.

Most days, 1 would be more than enough. Others, 30 wouldn't save your hide. However, I don't think it's unreasonable to carry at least one reloads worth of ammo in some form or fashion.

Backpacker33
April 8, 2013, 12:05 PM
When working law enforcement I could carry speed loaders on a belt, until we were issued semi-autos, of course! However, as "just a citizen" I found them too bulky and I didn't have the same imperative as when I was a LEO. Starting way back I was taught the best reload is a second gun, and that's how I did and do it, with "extra ammo" carried in the strips and/or a dump pouch because they are flat. I found this important for concealed carry because there are just too many people who want to cause you trouble by reporting "man with a gun." It's also too easy to inadvertently enter a building in Wisconsin that has an anti-self-defense sign that is hard to see. This almost happened to me a couple weeks ago. I went to a building I've entered a half-dozen times or more. They did not have the sign. Then, a legal firm in it decided they prefer victims and harassed the building owner until a sign was put up. The glass door and surrounding windows are heavily tinted, making the sign almost invisible. In addition, workmen were moving furniture in and out and had propped the door open, putting the sign out of the line of sight. As I entered, a yellow splash caught my eye and I turned to see the sign, opaque from the back. Concerned it might be an anti-self-defense sign, I stepped back outside and squinted through the tinting to read it. I have no doubt that members of that law firm would have been quick to chastise me or even report me.
So, speed strips. And a New York Reload.

PRM
April 8, 2013, 03:25 PM
Hum...Old School

Handful of cartridges in my right front pocket :-)

Fuego
April 9, 2013, 01:00 PM
I carry two speed strips in my Carlisle Bandage pouch. But I am old fashioned.

asia331
April 10, 2013, 01:08 AM
Speed strip always for the SP101 back-up. When a revolver is primary I'll throw an additional speed loader or two in the suit coat or jacket pocket

Green Lantern
April 30, 2013, 10:27 PM
Main carry gun for me currently is a Ruger LCR, in a Tuff products pocket holster with a built-in pocket for speed strips - so no excuse not to carry at least one reload in a speed strip.

Yes, I practice with the speed strips - no, probably not as often as I should.

I do own one speedloader, made by 5-Star and designed to work much better for it than the (sadly, much less expensive) HKS J-frame speedloaders. I'll sometimes toss the speedloader in a jacket pocket.

Swing
April 30, 2013, 10:31 PM
Couple o' speedstrips.

kbbailey
April 30, 2013, 10:48 PM
I have both but really like the strips.

YJake
April 30, 2013, 11:20 PM
Speed strips for my J, K, and L framed guns.

I want to try an HKS speed loader but unless it's during our 2 week winter here in FL and I'm wearing a jacket I'll be carrying my reloads on a speed strip.

-Jake

herkyguy
May 1, 2013, 07:47 AM
usually speed strips. in my shoulder holster, the off side has two pouches for rounds that i carry loose.

kbbailey
May 1, 2013, 02:12 PM
I keep at least 6 speed strips loaded and at the ready. It doesn't matter which gun I grab, the strips will work. I have 5-shot, 7-shot, single action, a lever rifle, and two 6-shooters of different cylinder sizes in .357mag.

Also have speed strips for .45colt that work for .30-30 and .410 also.

Deaf Smith
May 1, 2013, 04:10 PM
For a J .38 I prefer a Airweight .38 as the speed loader.

Nothing beats a 'pre-loaded' gun.

Deaf

camsdaddy
May 2, 2013, 01:32 PM
I carry 1- speed strip in my strong side coin pocket of my jeans loaded 2 space 3 with 158 gr lswchp. In my strong side back pocket I have a strip with 4 fmj for recreational use and two shot shell in case needed.

hariph creek
May 2, 2013, 06:23 PM
Speedstrip, unless I'm wearing a coat (big pockets).

CarbineWilliams
May 2, 2013, 11:19 PM
I got an HK speedloader and for the load, it is awesome. Unload, kind of tough.

BulletshooterNJ
May 3, 2013, 12:11 AM
Speed strips are good for the range, but they take quite a few very deliberate motions to complete. Eject shells from cylinder, whip out speedstrip, and while keeping your focus on the gun and removing your danger scanning abilities, line up cylinder, pluck in 2 rounds, rotate the cylinder by thumb a 1/3 turn, pluck in 2 more rounds, rotate the cylinder by thumb a 1/3 turn, pluck in 1 or 2 more rounds (if its a 5 shooter or 6 shooter), knock the strip away, close cylinder, and reassess the situation.
Gee, that's quite a bit of work. It works best when standing still because of the dexterity involved, but imagine trying to retreat and do all of the above steps.

Speedloader: bang bang bang bang bang, [empty], eject spent shells, whip out HKS or Safariland unit, take a second to line up the noses of the rounds into the chambers, twist or press the knob, knock the loader away, close cylinder, and reassess the situation.

A Speedloader means your eyes are focused on the reloading task for fewer seconds than with the speedstrip. Of course with either you can fumble a round or two, but in all honesty the speedloader is the better tactical option. Speedstrips: too many microsteps involving rotating the cylinder and thumbing and twisting rounds into the chambers, and more seconds will go by in which you are a non-combatant / target. But they do work great at the range in that they give your speedloaders a break from some wear and tear.

Jim K
May 4, 2013, 09:47 PM
As a deputy sheriff, I carried speed loaders. But at one time I carried five round for a Chiefs Special in a M1903 Springfield clip. I trimmed the spring down, pinched in the sides and it worked fine for .38 Special, as well as being flat. The drawback was that it took two hands to strip the rounds out for reloading. Maybe I was young and foolish at the time, but I figured that if five rounds hadn't stopped the problem, I was probably in very deep trouble and running like hell really was an option.

Jim

Merle1
May 5, 2013, 10:40 AM
I carry two HKS speedloaders, unless I want to burden myself with my M625. Then I carry two full moon clips.
I just can't use a speed strip fast enough to be comfortable with it.

Merle

Gaucho Gringo
May 5, 2013, 08:15 PM
What all of the previous posts are assuming a person in peak physical abilities and speed. Me I was born with a mild case of Cerebral Palsy which has always made me a step slower than I would like and a little shakier than most. And 62 years of age and severe degenerative arthritis has not helped any either. I have held jobs until my health forced me to retire, have been married 30 years with 2 children and 2 lovely grandchildren. This said I have been shooting since I was 7 thanks to my father and have had a gun in my possession since age 12. I have learned over the years how to somewhat compensate for my disabilities, but offhand I have never been that good, but give me a rest and a heavy, long barrel in a rifle or revolver and I used to be able to hold my own. I guess where this is going is in my case case if I ever have to stop a threat I had better be able to do it with the gun I have without reloading because if I don't I think it will make any difference. Don't get me wrong, I will fight tooth and nail to protect my loved ones and always have been that way but for me the options are more limited. Around the house I have multiple firearms stashed for easy access, but away I am vulnerable and realize it. I have come to the conclusion that a small auto with extra mags is the option although I really prefer revolvers. I recently bought a CZ 50 but haven't been to the range to fire it. If anyone has any better suggestions in a revolver that will be remodeled slow please chime in. Thank you.

beag_nut
May 5, 2013, 08:41 PM
When pocket carry, I carry no extra rounds. One five-shot snubbie is enough, because I can hit what I aim at. And I pocket carry only in cities or suburbs.
When woods carry, in a waist pack, I carry two Safariland speedloaders, because they ARE speedloaders, and each is loaded differently. Outdoors in the boonies the potential threats are more varied, hence the variety in my cartridges. And no snubbie in that environment.

EddieG54
May 5, 2013, 09:04 PM
I normally carry a HKS speedloader for my J Frame but sometimes it's a Ruger LCP in my left front pocket. At my age the New York reload is much faster!

Rexster
May 5, 2013, 10:11 PM
I guess it would be worth practicing reloading any revolver that is used for concealed carry, but I wonder what most folks use, a strip or a speed loader? The strip seems much easier to actually carry, but it appears that a speed loader is quicker to use. And I also wonder what percentage of folks who carry a revolver have ANY type of additional load with them routinely, or do they count on the 5 or 6 rounds to be enough?
I cannot say what "most folks" use. I generally carry two guns. As one is usually an SP101 snubby, I usually carry at least one Bianchi Slow Strip along with it. If my second gun is also an SP101, or another .357 revolver, I will add more Slow Strips. If one of the revolvers is a larger weapon, I am likely to add one or two speedloaders, for the larger sixgun, depending upon the anticipated threat level.

If the outer clothing is conducive to it, I like to use a 2x2x2 loader on the front of the belt. These are quite fast, with a bit of practice!

Back to Slow Strips; these are quite slow for a full reload, but actually a very fast way to get TWO cartridges into the cylinder, and those two cartridges just might save one's life. I believe that in some of the infamous incidents in which LEOs, without speedloaders, have been killed while reloading, the LEOs might have survived had they not tried to do a complete six-round reload. I believe it is important to practice a two-round reload. I do not mean, in this case, a "tactical" reload, but loading two rounds into a just-emptied cylinder. These two rounds can come from a Slow Strip, a 2x2x2 pouch, a cartridge loop slide on the belt, or any other system that holds cartridges in line next to each other.

dakotasouth
May 5, 2013, 10:20 PM
I have used both loaders and strips. The strips are much easier to carry around and are admittedly slower than the speed loaders.

After months of fiddling, I chose the strips to feed my M&P 340... simply because they were pretty quick and much easier to carry.

Now days, I stick with a 9mm Shield in my pocket and a single extra magazine. Flatter firearm is easier for me to carry.

JVaughn
May 5, 2013, 10:51 PM
When I carry revolver, I carry 2 speed loaders. I think mine are HKS, not sure the difference.

kmrcstintn
May 14, 2013, 12:58 AM
hunting sidearm -- speed loader
ccw -- speed strip
hiking/woods walking/scouting -- speed loader
derringer -- speed strip

ICE1210
May 14, 2013, 01:28 AM
I use the Safariland speed loaders appropriate to the revolver being carried. Usually it is the small 5shot ones for my S&W640. I have found them to be faster than speed strips and not at all difficult to hide in my front right pants pocket. Usually I'll have three.

Target008
May 14, 2013, 04:17 PM
I can't tell you how much i personally love the safari land comp II it is by far my favorite speed loader. I have always been interested to try moon clips but have never gotten around to sending a revolver off to have the mod done. I have heard/read/researched extensively on moon clips and the common consensus is the shorter the over all cartridge length is the easier they are to use. also lead nosed bullets can cause some minor issues.

Green Lantern
May 14, 2013, 04:34 PM
I was thinking about starting a new thread on this, but this seems as fair a place as any to put it....

I usually wear cargo pants of some sort, so it's not like I have much of an excuse not to carry more reloads. But I was also unsure how wise it would be to just carry loose speedloaders in a pocket. I only own one, 5-Shot brand. Gave my other one to a relative who is going to get a Ruger LCR as well. Mode of dress pretty well limits me to pocket carry, and I can't really carry anything on my belt without it drawing attention.

Here locally I see fabric speedloader cases, I think I could manage them in the cargo pockets but they're pretty thin and don't really seem like they'd offer much in the way of protection. I've seen rigid ones online, don't think they'd be too much bigger than the other ones.

Maybe I'm over-worrying about carrying loose speedloaders as far as the rounds falling out or something, but having a case of some sort to keep them oriented upright would seem to be a plus too.

45crittergitter
May 20, 2013, 02:42 PM
I prefer to carry in a strip. I prefer to load (when reloading quickly) from a loader.

DeepSouth
May 20, 2013, 02:59 PM
Moonclips.

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