The Screws on a "Three Screw Super Blackhawk"


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Billy Jack
April 7, 2013, 02:22 PM
Those of you shooting a "3 screw Ruger", do you Loc-tite the screws or just retighten every time you clean the revolver after a shooting session?

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Coyote3855
April 7, 2013, 02:25 PM
I check mine occasionally, but have never had a problem with them shooting loose.

murf
April 7, 2013, 03:00 PM
those screws are basically just pivot pins for the hammer, trigger and cylinder latch. if they come lose, parts are binding and should be fixed. hammer could be rubbing on the frame if the big screw keeps backing out.

luck,

murf

Drail
April 7, 2013, 03:43 PM
Screws on any firearm that has them should be checked for tightness regularly. On the big bores especially. On a Charter Bulldog you should keep a screwdriver in your back pocket.:rolleyes:

Billy Jack
April 7, 2013, 06:02 PM
They don't really come loose, they just need a tiny bit of retightening after a good shooting session.
I don't think I'll use loc-tite. Just touch them up when I clean it each time as I've been doing.

WardenWolf
April 7, 2013, 08:36 PM
Purple Loctite is just strong enough to keep them from vibrating loose. It won't make it hard to disassemble. That's my recommendation.

Billy Jack
April 7, 2013, 10:56 PM
If some of the 3 side screws are acting as pivot pins can they be removed, loc-tite'd, and reassembled without parts coming loose. In other words is it as easy as just taking them out and adding loctite and putting them back in or does the gun have to be disassembled,

tipoc
April 7, 2013, 11:40 PM
Have the screws on your gun been coming loose?

tipoc

Billy Jack
April 8, 2013, 09:24 PM
They don't really come loose, they just need a tiny bit of retightening after a good shooting session.

rcmodel
April 8, 2013, 09:35 PM
I have made it SOP for the last 40 years or so to degrease the threads and add a tiny drop of BLUE #242 Lock-Tight to all SAA screws, regardless of the name of the company on it.

You do that?
They won't ever shoot loose again.
But you can easily take the out if you need too.

As for taking them out and having loose parts fall out inside the gun??
Use a wood dowel slave pin, run in from the other side to hold parts in place while you take each screw out.


Ruger, at least used to put some sort of red thread-locker stuff on all the screws when they made them.

But once unscrewed?
You have to do it again.

rc

bergmen
April 8, 2013, 10:38 PM
Exactly what rc said. I would add that one way I do this is to back out the screw to where it is almost disengaged with the thread in the frame, spray the exposed threads in the frame with Powder Blast (or equiv) to remove gun oil, hit it with the air compressor to dry it out, add the 242 (just a tiny little bit will do) and run the screw back in and tighten.

Works for me.

Dan

murf
April 9, 2013, 02:17 AM
the red stuff is still on the screws sent out from ruger.

billyjack, if you don't want to pull the pivot screws all the way out, unscrew them a few turns, flip the gun over on the opposite side, put a couple drops of blue loctitie on the screw shank, and retighten. give the loctite a bit to flow down over the threads before flipping back over.

murf

rcmodel
April 9, 2013, 02:22 AM
the red stuff is still on the screws sent out from ruger. Well O.K. then.

Just be aware that the soft red stuff Ruger uses is not the same thing as the Red Lock-Tight that needs 400 degrees heat to break lose without stripping the screw slots!!

NOT the same stuff folks!!

And don't make the mistake of thinking it is!

rc

Billy Jack
April 9, 2013, 08:14 AM
All fantastic replies! That gives me just the right information to do the job with confidence.

Last question ......I have a small tube of LOCTITE that is blue that I have used often and it is removable without heat. It is not 242 but 82361 and is called TITE'N For Bolts. It is blue and it's LOCTITE brand (found it on their website.)
Anyone know what the difference is and any reason I should not use it for this purpose.

MikeJackmin
April 9, 2013, 08:53 AM
For reasons I cannot fathom, loctite uses different colors for the liquid, and for the tube it is stored in. The colors referenced here refer to the color of the liquid, not the color of the tube.

Do not put the red liquid on your ruger! That would be bad.

I'd strongly suggest getting a tube of exactly what was recommended from your local Walmart or autoparts store.

Billy Jack
April 9, 2013, 09:28 AM
Yes I was referring to the liquid color not the tube. The TITE"N liquid looks, and from my experience so far, works exactly like the 242 mentioned.
So much to learn ...so little time! I do know from working in an electrical/mechanical repair shop for many years that the red bottle stuff is about like soldering those threads.

bergmen
April 9, 2013, 12:20 PM
There are three commercially available general use thread locking compounds from Loctite:

1) Loctite® Threadlocker Red 271™. Description:

Loctite® Threadlocker Red 271™ is designed for the permanent locking and sealing of threaded fasteners. The product cures when confined in the absence of air between close fitting metal surfaces. It protects threads from rust and corrosion and prevents loosening from shock and vibration. It is only removable once cured by heating up parts to 500°F (260°C).

Recommended for:

Use on metal fasteners up to 1” (25 mm) in diameter such as bolts on decks, ready-to-assemble furniture, mounts, rings, gear bolts and frame bolts.

2) Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242®. Description:

Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners which require normal disassembly with standard hand tools. The product cures when confined in the absence of air between close fitting metal surfaces. It protects threads from rust and corrosion and prevents loosening from shock and vibration. Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is particularly suited for applications on less active substrates such as stainless steel and plated surfaces, where disassembly is required for servicing.

Recommended for:

Use on metal fasteners 1/4” (6 mm) to 3/4” (19 mm) in diameter such as bolts on small engines, swing sets and furniture.

3) Loctite® Threadlocker Green 290™. Description:

Loctite® Threadlocker Green 290™ is designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners. Due to it’s low viscosity and capillary action, the product wicks between engaged threads and eliminates the need to disassemble prior to application. Loctite® Threadlocker Green 290™ cures when confined in the absence of air between close fitting metal surfaces. It prevents loosening from shock and vibration and leakage from shock and vibration and protects threads from rust and corrosion. The product can also be used to fill porosity in welds, casting and powder metal parts. Localized heating and hand tools are needed for disassembly.

Recommended for:

Use on metal fasteners 1/12” (2.2 mm) to 1/2” (12.7 mm) in diameter such as pre-assembled fasteners, instrumentation crews, carburetors and electrical connectors.

Even though 242 is recommended for fasteners 1/4" diameter and up it still owrks satisfactorily for much smaller fasteners (such as those used in firearms).

Data here:

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/techdata-msds.shtml

Dan

CraigC
April 12, 2013, 07:23 PM
I have made it SOP for the last 40 years or so to degrease the threads and add a tiny drop of BLUE #242 Lock-Tight to all SAA screws, regardless of the name of the company on it.
Sound advice!

Blue 242 (not the only blue one) is the easiest to find and works fine. Purple 222(?) is the best for the application and green wicks into the threads without disassembling.

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