Checking Your Scale


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Tamitch
April 13, 2013, 08:23 PM
Do any of you reloaders have a weight gage set to check your scale and powder measure?

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clutch
April 13, 2013, 08:28 PM
Yes I do. Lyman makes an inexpensive set of check weights. I can't believe it took me 30 years to get a set.

zxcvbob
April 13, 2013, 08:28 PM
I have a designated dime with '35' written on it with a Sharpie. It weighs exactly (by my decree) 35 grains. ;) It works because I use the same one every time.

cwbys4evr
April 13, 2013, 08:33 PM
Good idea ^

Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

higgite
April 13, 2013, 08:34 PM
Yes.

rg1
April 13, 2013, 08:45 PM
Yes I have Lyman's Scale Check Weight set and use it. Makes me confident that my digital electronic scale is accurate at all charges from .380 pistol to large rifle loads. I also check my balance beam RCBS when I do get it out of storage. For what it's worth, my Pact Precision has always been accurate and it's about 17-18 years old.

rcmodel
April 13, 2013, 08:48 PM
IMO: A 35 grain dime works great.

Unless you are weighing 3.5 grain powder charges.

So does a 55 grain Hornady V-Max bullet.
Unless you are weighing 5.5 grain powder charges.

Buy a check weight set.

rc

Reloadron
April 13, 2013, 08:49 PM
Yes, been bringing home test weights from work for years. Retiring soon so time to pop for my own set and check them in the lab at work before I am out of there. :)

The Lyman set seems a good well priced set for the buck (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/612694/lyman-scale-weight-check-set).

I also do have assorted test weights that came with scales.

Ron

gamestalker
April 13, 2013, 08:52 PM
I can seem to find a reason why a good beam scale would suddenly start throwing bad weights? I still check mine every time there is a blue moon, but it's right on the money, even after several decades of reliable service.
GS

rcmodel
April 13, 2013, 09:22 PM
It won't change.
Unless you drop it.

Or the bearing pivot pin finally cracks the beam while setting in its storage box after 40+ years like my old RCBS scales did a couple of years ago.

No matter what you use for a check weight, be it a bullet, a dime, or a known weight of belly button lent.

Use something.

rc

clutch
April 13, 2013, 09:59 PM
I can seem to find a reason why a good beam scale would suddenly start throwing bad weights? I still check mine every time there is a blue moon, but it's right on the money, even after several decades of reliable service.
GS

I had a loose pivot in my Lyman scale. It took me a long time to figure out why my zero would shift a few tenths from time to time.

mtrmn
April 14, 2013, 12:51 PM
I had a loose pivot in my Lyman scale. It took me a long time to figure out why my zero would shift a few tenths from time to time.
I knocked my RCBS 1010 off a shelf recently and had trouble with it zeroing. When I investigated further, the pivot was loose in the beam like you mentioned. I sent it to RCBS for "evaluation" and repair. When I returned home from work 3 weeks later I found a brand new 1010 scale with an invoice that said it was free of charge. Never expected to get it replaced, just wanted to see if it was repairable. THANKS RCBS!!!

Joatmon
April 14, 2013, 01:00 PM
I check it every time I use it (new session). It only takes a minute or two to check 2 weights (low and high mass) to calibrate and see if there are issues. A problem could be caused by a simple bit of dust or dreck on the pivot point. Maybe I am OCD but thats me.

dickttx
April 14, 2013, 07:20 PM
Every time I start to load I check the level of my beam scale.
Then I throw a charge from my PAD and see that it still weighs the same as previously.
You could say I use my scale to check my powder measure and use my powder measure to check my scale. Everytime.

Outlaw714
April 15, 2013, 06:49 AM
A dime is an inexpensive way to check.

daboone
April 15, 2013, 10:11 AM
American science and surplus http://www.sciplus.com/p/BRASS-WEIGHTS_3097 has a set of gram scale weights for 18 bucks.

Jitterbug
April 15, 2013, 10:17 AM
Each and every time...I wouldn't reload without confirming.

tbob38
April 15, 2013, 01:14 PM
I just got a check weight set, after 45 years of reloading.

John3921
April 15, 2013, 03:19 PM
I'm thinking about a check weight now. I have a Lyman 500 beam scale that I've used for the last 20 odd years. Loading for the 45 I'm looking at 4.2 gr of clays. When I zero out the scale and adjust the throw to drop 4.2 consistently, then I will throw 10 and weigh it. I rather consistently get about 43.5 for 10 drops. I'm thinking I want to make myself a 4.2 grain check weight and use that to zero the scale.

16in50calNavalRifle
April 15, 2013, 09:12 PM
Just to throw out another option, based on a post here in this forum I learned of check weights from McMaster-Carr, an industrial tool and parts supplier. Ordered a 1-gram and a 5-gram weight, for a grand total of $11.88 (incl. shipping). Delivered in less than 24 hours. I figure these two weights will provide confidence in my RCBS 505 at the lower- and upper-range of weights relevant to my reloading. (www.mcmaster.com)

Sure enough, the scale indicated what looked to be exactly the right reading for the two check weights. Oh - and mtrmn, to echo your account, I bought a 505, used. Seemed squirrelly, didn't seem right, first time I went to reload. Contacted RCBS, they said send it in, sure enough 10 days later a brand-new 505 was delivered free of charge. Ended up paying $20 for an $80 scale.

steelerdude99
April 15, 2013, 09:53 PM
A poor man's check weight is a BB, they are supposed to be 5.1 grain.

edfardos
April 15, 2013, 10:13 PM
some lead shavings in a ball of masking tape. Make one for each of your favorite loads.. Always zero first, then verify your selected weight with hour tape/lead check weight.. Write the grain value on the tape.

edfardos

Searcher4851
April 15, 2013, 10:20 PM
Yes I have and use check weights on my scale. I use an Ohaus 10-10. I guess I just figure if I'm going to use a precision piece of equipment, it just makes sense to make sure it IS precise. JMHO

Geno
April 15, 2013, 10:27 PM
I sure do, and I use it. Better safe than sorry.

Geno

BYJO4
April 15, 2013, 11:03 PM
A set of check weights is a good investment. They don't cost alot and will insure your scale is accurate.

Kernel
April 16, 2013, 08:34 AM
IMO: A 35 grain dime works great.

Unless you are weighing 3.5 grain powder charges.

Then throw 10 charges into the pan. Should weigh exactly 35 grains.

I always average my charge weights with multiple throws.

threoh8
April 16, 2013, 10:07 AM
"... supposed to be ...". Those are big words when it comes to measuring powder, where being just a little off can cause bad things to happen.

Check weights are cheap insurance, especially when compared to the price of some of the gadgets reloaders and shooters buy.

HOWARD J
April 16, 2013, 10:43 AM
lyman scale check weights

Dframe
April 16, 2013, 11:19 AM
Yes I do. Not often but every once in a while. Lyman and others have inexpensive check weights and they provide peace of mind. I'm meticulous about my reloading. I've never had an accident in well over 40 years and would like to keep it that way.

jim243
April 16, 2013, 11:41 AM
Yes

steelerdude99
April 17, 2013, 10:00 AM
"... supposed to be ...". Those are big words when it comes to measuring powder, where being just a little off can cause bad things to happen.

Check weights are cheap insurance, especially when compared to the price of some of the gadgets reloaders and shooters buy.

I just put a Daisy BB on my old REDDING Powder and Bullet balance beam scale. It showed that it’s a little over 5.1 gains. I took two BBs and it put them both on and they are 10.3 grains. This is within the implied tolerance of the scale of +/- 0.1 grain. Having 0.1 grain increments is what I mean by “implied tolerance”.

I looked and could not find a Crossman BB. From what I remember, Daisy BBs have a tiny little flat spot on them while Crossman BBs were perfectly round. That may have changed with new ones, but these Daisy BBs are from the 70s or 80s.

This scale is so old it costs a whopping $14.00 and that’s printed right on the box that.

Chuck

Comrade Mike
April 17, 2013, 10:24 AM
I use the two gram check weights that come with my RCBS charge master and I also have a designated .45 bullet that's exactly 185 grains. No problems so far. Ill get tiny fluctuations of +\- a tenth of a grain occasionally but that's close enough for government work. I'm not hot rodding anything.

J2FLAN
April 17, 2013, 02:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by threoh8
"... supposed to be ...". Those are big words when it comes to measuring powder, where being just a little off can cause bad things to happen."

I like that-- cause, check weights are "supposed to be" dead on. :)

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