Blood Work: Clint Eastwood


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45R
February 3, 2003, 11:44 AM
Has anyone seen this movie yet?
C.E. did a fatanstic job with the movie, but the gun handling was horrible.

Granted that he was holding a bad guy at bay, about 90 percent of the time he had his finger on the trigger of a cocked .357 mag/.38 revolver whether he was going to shoot or if he had it out for show.

Great ending though.

45R

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BigG
February 3, 2003, 11:55 AM
Maybe his safety is between is ears... :D

Mastrogiacomo
February 3, 2003, 12:05 PM
Gee folks, maybe Clint is just an actor. You think? I wasn't under the impression actors knew how to use their props, nor is it a big issue whether they know all the minor details of gun handling. They're more concerned with the lines...I wouldn't dwell on it. It was a great movie by the way.:D

yayarx7
February 3, 2003, 12:07 PM
The book was better, although it was a good movie.:D

45R
February 3, 2003, 12:13 PM
Gee folks, maybe Clint is just an actor. You think? I wasn't under the impression actors knew how to use their props, nor is it a big issue whether they know all the minor details of gun handling.

:evil: But Mr. Eastwood is a public figure. He should be a roll model to all future Dirty Harry cops. Still breaking all the rules of gun safety is a bad thing.:neener:

Joe Demko
February 3, 2003, 12:49 PM
Eastwood is nothing but an actor. Hitchcock said it best when he said that "actors are cattle." All of them. Their job is to perform by learning their lines and emoting in a believable fashion. it is up to the writers to provide them with good scripts and the director to, of course, direct them. If we are going to get all anal over the gun handling, I guess we should blame the director and/or producer for not having a technical advisor on the set to help Mr. Eastwood with that aspect of the performance. It wouldn't matter to you guys that he was doing something wrong with the gun except that, deep down, you want to believe he really is like the Dirty Harry character he portrayed. Just like a previous generation wanted to believe that John Wayne was really a hero.

BigG
February 3, 2003, 01:00 PM
I think the points about acting and directing are right on but I also think there are different things that work for different people. In other words, all the admonitions about keeping your finger off the trigger except when you are ready to fire is fine as far as it goes, but sometimes it's appropriate to have your finger on the trigger, despite what all the rangemasters and gurus say. It is up to the individual to decide when the finger on the trigger is appropriate, not some author or self-appointed guru. Gee don't you hate that? Personal responsibility.

jpwright
February 3, 2003, 02:20 PM
I greatly enjoyed Blood Work. Seems to me that Clint Eastwood is evolving into a real actor in his senior years.

I notice when someone in a movie handles a gun correctly, but unless it's really bad, I tend not to notice much when they don't. I did notice him firing a shot into a stack of newspapers at a newsstand. Not too likely, I thought.

I just watched Heartbreak Ridge again. It was interesting that some of the actors' guns rode up on full auto and some didn't.

mguffey
February 3, 2003, 02:36 PM
Sorry, but as a long time Eastwood fan, my opinion was that this film is proof his best films are behind him. One problem is his poor gunhandling tactics, another is the gunfight inside metal walls, but the major problem I had with him was his using another of his no-talent paramours as the female lead. I found the story predictable. Satisfying, but predictable. Wife had it figured as soon as Jeff Daniels' character was intro'd. Not THAT's predictable.

As a go to the moviehouse experience, nope.
As TV fare, pretty good.
As a gun savvy movie, nope. And though I didn't go back and rewatch it for a bullet count, it seemed he got more than 8 shots out of that .357 (which should have made him deaf and night blind from firing inside the boat.)

My biggest problem with the movie was Jeff Daniels as the bad guy. Man, that guy should be doing something else besides drama.

(Paramour? Yes, here in the South, we mow the lawn with those.)

Longbow
February 5, 2003, 03:20 PM
Good movie! ' just seen it today. I agree on gun handling comments.
8 shot .357 mag?! Must be a custom shop, eh?

Elmer Snerd
February 5, 2003, 03:50 PM
it might have been one of these (http://gunsrus.net/catalog/taurus__608_-__357_mag___8_shot_revolver_907882.htm).

jmbg29
February 5, 2003, 04:42 PM
If we are going to get all anal over the gun handling, I guess we should blame the director and/or producer for not having a technical advisor on the set to help Mr. Eastwood with that aspect of the performance.Eastwood was the director.

Big Al
February 5, 2003, 04:51 PM
I liked Blood Work. My fiancee and I figured it out at the same time, when the little boy figured out the code.

Jeff Daniels is a versatile actor. I can't wait for Dumb and Dumberer.:D

Longbow
February 6, 2003, 01:32 AM
Elmer,
He specifically said S&W, nice try though!:)

Kahr carrier
February 6, 2003, 06:47 AM
Yep it a S&W PC gun.:)

mguffey
February 6, 2003, 11:23 AM
S&W does make an 8 shot 357. I just can't recall (or find) the model number just now. But does it make a difference?

And as to the technical aspects of the gun play... this was one of the hallmarks of Eastwoods cop flicks. And the inaccuracies and the inane shoot-em-ups were a serious flaw. A mark of a the serious decline in Eastwood quality this film represents.

mguffey
February 6, 2003, 11:49 AM
Here is a page on the S&W 8-shot .357 similar to (or the same as) the one used in Bloodwork:
http://matrix.dumpshock.com/raygun/firearms/pistol/sw_627pc.html

cratz2
February 6, 2003, 03:36 PM
Poor gun handling aside, I enjoyed the movie. I'm somewhat of a movie snob and I find most mainstream Hollywood to be predictable. But it came across as a mature movie, not as good as Pale Rider and certainly not as good as Unforgiven, but very watchable. Maybe not a second time. ;)

VictorLouis
February 6, 2003, 06:00 PM
... the major problem I had with him was his using another of his no-talent paramours as the female lead. ....Wife had it figured as soon as Jeff Daniels' character was intro'd. Not(sic) THAT's predictable. If you're referring to Wanda DeJesus, she's involved with Jimmy Smits, not Clint.:) The "no-talent" is open for debate, but I like her on CSI: Miami.:cool: It came to me the same as with your wife, and my wife just couldn't understand how I got it so fast.:eek:

vitiaz
February 6, 2003, 06:09 PM
"his best films are behind him"

Mguffey...I thought so too. Too much of a 'formula' movie. I long for the days of 'Coogan's Bluff', 'Play Misty...' etc. This one was just waaaayyy too predictable.

hansolo
February 6, 2003, 10:32 PM
At least there aren't any Orangatans in the flick.:uhoh:

waterdog
February 7, 2003, 12:08 AM
Eastwoods wife was in the movie. She was the hispanic news reporter who stuck her mike in his face and asked a question.

The scene with the little boy touching the 357, was pretty good. He didn't turn it into an anti-gun message, like most flicks do.

waterdog

Longbow
February 7, 2003, 02:01 AM
I agree!:) :)

Kahr carrier
February 7, 2003, 07:59 AM
Yup.:)

geegee
February 7, 2003, 09:58 AM
One of you folks may correct me on this, but wasn't there a scene in the original "Dirty Harry" where one of the bad cops is threading a silencer onto a revolver? :confused: :rolleyes: Needless to say, don't try that one at home (or anywhere else you're hoping for a .357 to go "pooof" when the trigger is pulled). geegee

VictorLouis
February 7, 2003, 11:36 AM
Eastwoods wife was in the movie. She was the hispanic news reporter who stuck her mike in his face and asked a question. My wife pointed that out to me, however, she was in no way a "female lead" by any means.

Kalvan
February 7, 2003, 05:30 PM
One of you folks may correct me on this, but wasn't there a scene in the original "Dirty Harry" where one of the bad cops is threading a silencer onto a revolver?
In Magnum Force, the second one "Dirty Harry" flick, there was a cop putting a silencer on his Python.

Longbow
February 7, 2003, 08:15 PM
On the history channel they showed an episode about spy/special weapons and they showed a revolver w/ a suppresor. The British guy said its a Dan Wesson screw on barrel. The barrel actually screws all the way in and seals the cylinder gap, thus making it a true silenced revolver. So I gues its possible.

Keith
February 8, 2003, 03:21 PM
That's another one of those urban gun legends that people accept as gospel - that you can't put a suppressor on a revolver.

Of course you can, and of course it will work! 95% of the noise comes out of the end of the barrel and that noise will be suppressed.

Both British and Russian intelligence people used suppressed revolvers for their "terminatory services". It makes sense because it takes an awful lot of tinkering to get a semi-auto to perform well with a suppressor.

With a revolver you just mount it and go. It won't be as quiet as a semi beacuse SOME noise will come out of the cylinder gap, but it will be quiet enough.

The British used Dan Wessons because the screw-in barrel system easily lent itself to the modification. No milling or threading or what have you was required to stick a suppressor on a Dan Wesson.

Keith

106rr
February 8, 2003, 04:10 PM
There were many errors in gun handling in "Blood Work." I understand that Clint is more of a businessman (Malpaso Productions) and a very ambitious actor from the days of Rawhide and the spaghetti westerns. He is also a passably good jazz musician. He grew up in Oakland during it's peaceful era, probably not much into guns.
He was however influential in getting California DFG to investigate and prosecute a poacher. It was the first use of PCR DNA to solve a poaching crime. It seems someone came onto private property near Hat Creek, CA (his new ranch is there) before the deer season opened and popped a major mule deer buck. They beheaded it and took off. DFG took a DNA sample from the carcass and matched it to a trophy rack. If you are thinking that the DFG will come to your property and help with prosecution you better get a few million bucks first.

Vladimir Berkov
February 8, 2003, 05:55 PM
Still, Eastwood always seem to play the same character, much like Wayne.

I have seen his movies, but once you have seen a couple you have seen one or two you have seen them all. Just like John Grishom novels.

HS/LD
February 8, 2003, 06:12 PM
He also turned the shotgun upside down to reload it from the side saddle.

It is a pity they couldn't hire someone to show them the "right way" to handle the firearms.


Regards,
HS/LD

lapidator
February 16, 2003, 12:41 PM
Well what about the kid-see's-the-gun scene? I thought it was done pretty well -- he tell him, "just look, see ... but don't touch" and doesn't try to scare the hell out of the lad. Basically, though not exactly, NRA Eddie's line.

lapidator

BigG
February 16, 2003, 03:34 PM
Here's my take on Blood Work:

Blood Work (http://www.epinions.com/content_90006064772)

gwalchmai
February 17, 2003, 11:18 AM
I avoided this thread until I saw the movie this weekend. I knew something was up with Buddy from the start. Why have a big name actor like Daniels playing a supporting role unless it was important? Once he said his name was Jasper Noone I said "No One? Or is he one of Herman's Hermits" But did "Jasper" signify anything?

4MUL8R
February 17, 2003, 07:39 PM
Model 627-3, reportedly. Performance Center made for Lew Horton, a major S&W distributor. Some folks say it has a fluted cylinder, which was not standard on that model. It is 8 shots, and comes with full moon clips for speedly reloading.

BigG
February 17, 2003, 09:21 PM
It had a fluted cylinder because I was looking at the flutes to see if it looked different than a six shot. The flutes were a little closer together than a six shot but not really that noticeable.

4MUL8R
February 18, 2003, 07:43 AM
I've wondered if it is another model of the 627, but there aren't that many. I guess I'll have to rent the movie to see!

BigG
February 18, 2003, 08:58 AM
It had the flat bbl sides and so on that characterizes the newer Scandium models. It also had the black pebble grained rubber grips.

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