School Me on Henry Rifles


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Double Vision
April 20, 2013, 07:01 AM
Yesterday I wandered into one of my local stores to look at Sigs :) but instead ended up looking at a Henry in 38/357.
I had never held one before and was very impressed with the quality of construction - it's beautiful!
The weight of the rifle does get your attention, as does the price tage at $849.
I have no intention of carrying a Henry in the field, but like the idea of a lever action in a pistol caliber that I'm already invested in. Also very important to me is that it's 100% Made in USA.
I already have a Winchester 30-30 but would consider adding a Henry. I've read a number of comments and discussions here on Henry as well as other places and have found few negative comments beyond the weight and the front-loading magazine.
Thanks in advance for your comments and advice.

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Steve51
April 20, 2013, 09:53 AM
I have been looking for one of those for months - none are available. I have 3 Henry lever action rifles (two are .22lr and one is .22mag). Their actions are very smooth. The stocks are top quality walnut. They are accurate and fun to shoot. They are completely American made.
I ended up buying a Rossi .38/.357 lever rifle but I really wanted another Henry.

Double Vision
April 21, 2013, 07:17 AM
Thanks Steve. I haven't read many negative comments about Henry rifles and your post reinforces those comments.

Carl N. Brown
April 21, 2013, 07:25 AM
Check out two of the "reality" television shows, Swamp People and American Hoggers, featuring people who hunt for a living and it is not hard to spot Henry rifles in these shows, which are not advertising rifles but showing hunters using what they own.

Crunchy Frog
April 21, 2013, 07:33 AM
I know a couple of folks who have the Henry Big Boy. We are cowboy action shooters so I see the Henry through that "lens".

One criticism of the HBB is that it's not a replica of anything. Does that matter? It may or may not. It doesn't affect how the gun functions. If you like having the type of gun (many of the modern guns, especially the Winchesters, are reproductions) that was used in the old West, it may matter.

It has shortcomings as a competition rifle, one being the lack of a loading gate on the receiver. The magazine tube is loaded from the muzzle like a rimfire .22 lever rifle. Fine for field use if you follow basic safety protocols but in cowboy action matches were shooters stand shoulder-to-shoulder at a loading table it can be a bit clumsy. It can be done safely though.

In cowboy action we run the lever guns hard and very fast. Many of the rifles are slicked up and some have aftermarket parts. There is no aftermarket support for the Henry. This means it's about as good out of the box as it's going to get. For the casual participant it is fun but you don't see any of the top shooters using the Henry. You might say it has a speed limit.

It's not an inexpensive rifle so if it doesn't do what you want you get to make another big purchase. I wouldn't recommend it for cowboy action shooting, personally, but if you want a field rifle I'd say compare it to the Braztech/Rossi 1892, to the Marlin and to the Uberti Winchester replicas, then make your choice.

InkEd
April 21, 2013, 09:06 AM
I love mine. Extremely smooth action.

KimberLover
April 21, 2013, 11:01 AM
Well, I have two Henry 22's and two Rossi 38/357's
The Henry's are Perfect out of the box.
The Rossi's, well no where near perfect and in need of slicking up to run smooth.
The Rossi octagon is poorly made.
The front sight is cleearly set to the right, and believe it or not, it shoots nearly perfect.
It is my understanding that Rossi bores the hole then mills the squares. Somewhere that is not up to any quality that I expect. Micking the barrel at the muzzle there is a lot of difference in thickness from one side to the other.
Rossi's were less expensive than the Henry in 38/357.
I have a new Henry Big Boy in 38/357 ordered.
If I were you "Double Vision" I'd snap that HBB up in a heart beat and never look back.
Hey! If you don't like it, I'll buy it from you or swap you a slicked up Rossi with boot.

Bushpilot
April 21, 2013, 01:13 PM
Crunchy Frog, you're not the only dissenter here... (Sorry to all you Henry fans but...) I think Henrys, both the 22's and the Big Boys, are the most over rated rifles that there are. The OP's inquiry however concerned the "Big Boys" so I'll try and stick to those. The rimfires are a whole other subject..

First of all, I will give credit where it is due, the Henry's are nicely stocked and finished, are sans some unnecessary, lawyer inspired safety and are made in the US. Beyond that it's pretty much down hill from there.

Henry's Big Boys are over priced, over sized and over weight, almost 9 pounds. If I’m going to lug a 9 lb, iron sighted rifle around I might as well carry a 9 lb M1 Garand, 30/06 rather than a 9lb .357! The Winchester 92 and Marlin 1894 both weigh about 6lbs. Henry’s have boxy, bulky lines. Some this bulk maybe necessary to ensure that the somewhat gaudy, sold brass alloy frames are strong enough to handle the pressures of modern cartridges. Something that New Haven Arms Company (later renamed Winchester), the makers of the real Henry, were smart enough to begin using better alternatives for back in 1873. The OP and others already mentioned the Big Boy's slow and awkward tube magazine style loading, which incidentally Winchester remedied back in 1866. This would be acceptable if the Big Boy was a replica of the original Henry (like the Uberti) but it's not even close. Tube loading is just a cheesy, cost cutting feature. My point here is that the Big Boy isn't a Henry replica and yet it still suffers from issues that were solved long ago... Why?

Henry’s Big Boy is expensive. When Henry first came on the scene selling copies of the old Ithaca 72, a.k.a. the 22 Henry lever, they were at least reasonably priced. Now that has all changed. That giant block of shiny brass called a Big Boy comes with a big price tag, $899.95, retail. Retail on a new Marlin 1894 is $649.

Another thing that has always bothered me about Henry is the way their marketing is intentionally misleading, strongly implying that their rifle or company has some historical connection to a romanticized past where none actually exists. If you’re into “big and shiny” buy a Henry "Big Boy." If you want a pistol caliber lever action rifle that’s trim, handy and light with some actual style and history, buy a Winchester 92 (or a Uberti or Rossi clone) or a Marlin 1894. 1873's are great too and very fast if you're a cowboy action shooter, just not as trim, light or strong as the 92 or 1894.

dprice3844444
April 21, 2013, 01:21 PM
they were originally made by some guy named henry

Redlegvzv
April 21, 2013, 01:31 PM
Golly, some hard comments about Henrys!

I bought a Golden Boy .22LR for my son and the more basic H-001 for myself. Hey, what can I say? My H-001 is light, handy, shoots well, and will accommodate a scope if you want one and has decent iron sights if you don't. I upgraded the front sight to the Hi-Viz, and on a Henry, unlike many rifles such as the 10/22, this can be done by anyone with only a screwdriver. None of those awful dovetails that take a sledgehammer to remove the front sight.

The H-001 was only a little more expensive than a 10/22, so I would not say that it was overpriced. And you will not find a prettier gun or a smoother action.

Just sayin' .... :eek:

thralldad
April 21, 2013, 02:23 PM
My son's Henry is like glass. My Ross M-92 (.357) was not as smooth but it is slick now after a bit of shooting.

bannockburn
April 21, 2013, 04:56 PM
I have considered getting a Henry for quite some time now but have ultimately felt that they were a bit too heavy for their chamberings and a might too expensive for my wallet.

k_dawg
April 21, 2013, 06:05 PM
IMHO: way way over priced for their capabilities, and not authentic enough to support the price.

shafter
April 21, 2013, 06:59 PM
The fact that they try to claim their heritage goes back to the original Henry rifle of Civil War and Old West fame really turns me off. They have NO connection whatsoever and shouldn't mislead people.

It's really a shame, they make a good product that they stand behind and shouldn't need to be misleading.

exdxgxe4life
April 21, 2013, 07:22 PM
Made in USA! Extremely smooth action. However, I personally like Marlins looks, and I can't put my finger on it, but for some reason they feel like toys to me. I wouldn't buy one, but I wouldn't tell you not to.

Double Vision
April 22, 2013, 08:20 AM
Thanks for the responses folks. You have given me a lot of pros and cons to consider.

Chevelle SS
April 22, 2013, 08:27 AM
My neighbor bought a 22 Henry and when we were shooting at about 45 yards, it was shooting about 8-10 inches high. We moved adjusted the sight all the way but it was still shooting about six inches high.

DM~
April 22, 2013, 09:11 AM
My neighbor bought a 22 Henry and when we were shooting at about 45 yards, it was shooting about 8-10 inches high. We moved adjusted the sight all the way but it was still shooting about six inches high.

And one call to Henry, and they will send you the proper sight to correct the problem...

I have 3 Henry lever 22's, (one is a 22 magnum) they have worked perfectly from day one...

DM

eastbank
April 22, 2013, 10:05 AM
look around and talk to people in the real world who use them just about every day and then decide. i picked up a few used win. 94/22,s and marlin 39,s in very good condition for less that 400.00 over the last few years and i would put any of them up againest a henry any day of the week. eastbank.

InkEd
April 22, 2013, 10:36 AM
The Henry is "a little different" than a Marlin or Winchester. This may (or may not) be a good thing for you. If you want a lightweight lever action that can be tuned for SASS or inexpensive hunting rifle that you won't care about beating up, then a Henry rifle might not be what you want to purchase. However, if you want a 100% American made rifle with a smooth action and beautiful finish, you might be interested in a Henry.

I liken it to having a Stainless Steel Ruger Vaquero. It's not authentic to the Old West. However, it kind of looks the part. It's a bit heavy but really smooth right out of the box. It can be used for everything like similar guns. Customer service is outstanding.

BCRider
April 22, 2013, 01:47 PM
I dearly love my rimfire Henrys. Bang for the buck the basic H001 round barrel rimfire gun really delivers. But clearly those with a thing about the ZAMAC alloy receiver do not see it that way despite legions of happy owners that report high round counts and years of trouble free shooting.

The Big Boy lineup, on the other hand, does leave me scratching my head. As mentioned they are bulky, heavy guns with the needlessly awkward forward reloading setup. For my money I'd far rather have a Rossi and send it off for a modest slicking up job or find an older used Marlin 1894. But for those folks that find them decent to shoulder and don't mind the forward reloading setup I understand that they do work well and shoot well.

"Overrated"? That depends on if the design suits what the owner wants. I would not be one of them but clearly they sell enough of them to keep the rifles in their lineup. So some folks are fond of them.

j2crows
April 22, 2013, 02:09 PM
I want one in .44 mag. I don't care about the dissenters.

bhk
April 22, 2013, 02:56 PM
I think the Henrys are well built and I read that they run superbly. But I just can't get over the fact that the .22 'blued' actions are painted alloy rather that solid steel like the guns they are cloned after. This, in no way, has anything to do with their utility and is just a hang-up that I and some others have.

I don't mind alloy and plastic on guns of modern design but, by golly, something that is supposed to be a Winchester clone at least should have a solid steel receiver. Winchester 94s, Winchesters 9422s, Marlins of all types, Rossis, and almost all of the others do.

That said, most Henry owners know what they are buying and seem to love them.

mr.t7024
April 23, 2013, 05:45 AM
I have two,the Henry Golden Boy in17HMR and one in 22LR. The actions are buttery smooth & accurate. Wood to metal fit is fine.

I have a Winchester 9422 and a 39A. the Henry is equal in all respects.

I am not sure how the Henry name was acquired, but Anthony Imperato has said countless times the That the Henry's today are not the same as those of yesteryear. In my opinion they are better.

BTW, name a firearms company that when you call and the president of the company answers the phone, it happens quite often at HRAC. :) Cliff

eastbank
April 23, 2013, 06:40 AM
you have to be kidding, ten years from now you may be singing a different tune. eastbank.

az_imuth
April 23, 2013, 07:17 AM
look around and talk to people in the real world who use them just about every day and then decide. i picked up a few used win. 94/22,s and marlin 39,s in very good condition for less that 400.00 over the last few years and i would put any of them up againest a henry any day of the week. eastbank.

I see this remark all of the time. Yes, you may be able to get a used Marlin (not likely a Winchester) for near the price of a NEW Henry. That's comparing apples to oranges (Used/New). I have picked up a like new Henry for $160 recently. Get any like new Marlins/Winchesters for that price lately? I certainly doubt it. Go like your Marlins, Winchesters and Brownings all you want. I certainly like mine. I also like the Henry's I own. They sell an enormous amount of them for a reason. They look nice, they function well, they're much less expensive than the alternatives, and they're the smoothest operating rimfire lever actions on the planet. Be happy with what you have. You don't have to knock other peoples choice just to make your rifles seem better.

DM~
April 23, 2013, 09:36 AM
you have to be kidding, ten years from now you may be singing a different tune. eastbank.

You may be right?? (i've had one of my Henry levers more than 5 yrs. now though)

BUT, until then, i'll keep shooting mine almost daily, like yesterday. I shot a tube full at my swinging targets, then an hour later dispatched a problem racoon! It just keeps working perfectly, no complaints from me about my Henry levers at all.

I really like the "lightness" and how handy they are......also how smoooooth they are, and you can buy a new one and it will work right out of the box!

DM

Bushpilot
April 23, 2013, 11:34 AM
I have a Winchester 9422 and a 39A. the Henry is equal in all respects.

The Henry 22 is far from being equal in "all respects." I bought a Henry .22 lever gun on a whim back when they were still reasonably priced, at about $180. I knew it wasn't a 9422 or a 39A but it had nice wood and it looked like it might be something cheap and fun to play with. The plastic front sight/barrel band wasn't molded correctly so it always leaned slightly to one side. Worst of all, the barrel actually "wiggled" in the receiver. You're not going to find issues like these that result from cheap materials and design on a 9422 or a 39A. The receivers on Henry 22's look like they are made from aluminum (standard) or brass alloy (Golden Boy) and "Zamack." The 9422 and 39A are made from steel. The barrel on a 39A is, I believe, threaded into the receiver, not pinned like the Henry. My Henry was quickly traded off and I was glad to be rid of it.

I am not sure how the Henry name was acquired, but Anthony Imperato has said countless times the That the Henry's today are not the same as those of yesteryear. In my opinion they are better.

First of all, the thought of comparing a real Henry rifle with today’s “Big Boy” is ridiculous. Real Henry’s were revolutionary, cutting edge technology and were made to a standard that was a good as could possibly be made at the time. A real Henry might cost the average worker or soldier the equivalent of 4 to 6 months wages but was deemed to be worth the price because it’s capabilities were so revolutionary that it might actually save the owners life. Today’s “Big Boy” is insignificant by comparison and is only “better” in that it is center fire and has benefitted from 150 years worth of advancement in metallurgy and manufacturing technology.

In the Henry H001 series owners manual it says "We are proud to have crafted this rifle for you in the great tradition of Henry Repeating Arms Company which dates back to 1860 when the first effective, lever-action repeating rifle was developed by our founder, Benjamin Tyler Henry".

That statement is a complete lie... The “Henry Repeating Arms Company” was founded in NY in 1996. The company Benjamin Tyler Henry founded was the “New Haven Arms Company” in CT whose name was changed to the “Winchester Repeating Arms Company” in 1866. The Folks at Henry must not have much respect for their gun buying customers to lie to them in this way... Or, they just assume that we are too ignorant to know any better.

BTW, name a firearms company that when you call and the president of the company answers the phone, it happens quite often at HRAC. Cliff

I care more about the lack of a loading gate, 3 extra pounds of useless metal and a company that lies to it customers than I do about who answers the phone.

InkEd
April 23, 2013, 11:50 AM
The current Springfield Armory has nothing to to do with the old government arsenal and new Rock Island stuff is from overseas. So, it isn't a new idea to use a defunct famous name. I don't care for the practice but it has become common.

Also, it's not like any of the "old regime" companies like S&W, Remington, et cetera are "really" the same companies anymore either.

In some ways, I think (if nothing else) it honors/keeps the history alive even if it is just in name only.

BCRider
April 23, 2013, 02:30 PM
You haters can hate all you want. In the meantime my two rimfire Henrys keep on shooting accurately and reliably.

I too had a thing about the Zamac alloy reciever. But based on the glowing reports from a couple of shooting buddy's I hesitently bought my H001.

Three years later and up around probably 3000 or more rounds through it I am one highly happy and enthusiastic camper. The Zamac issue has simply proven to be a non-issue other than the poor adhesion of the paint on the receiver. Somehow I've managed to produce two scratches in it. The feel of the action is as tight and smooth now as it was when it came out of the box.

To those reading in that want more opinions from the owners I'd suggest that they read the Henry subforum at Rimfire Central.

eastbank
April 23, 2013, 04:38 PM
my oldest 39 marlin made in 1957 shot several hundred rounds a week,week in and week out when my two boys were growning up and it still works like it should with no problems. very seldon did a brick last a week. being very conservitive i would say it shot over 3000 rounds a summer. eastbank.

DM~
April 23, 2013, 07:31 PM
my oldest 39 marlin made in 1957 shot several hundred rounds a week,week in and week out when my two boys were growning up and it still works like it should with no problems. very seldon did a brick last a week. being very conservitive i would say it shot over 3000 rounds a summer. eastbank.

Sounds like around here, when friends/family show up with a pile of 22 ammo and no guns. They all know i don't care how much they shoot mine, so when they show up, they grab the Henry 22 off the ATV, and then it's time to break out the second Henry too, and let them all get after it. lol

The one on the ATV get's shot the most, and neither one has ever been cleaned since new, so we will see how they do as the years pile up! At this point, they still work like new...

Only one that's needed anything is the one on the ATV... I shot a racoon with it the other day and when i got up to it to poke it, it came to life and chewed the 0 ring off the end of the removable tube for loading. I got a finisher in before any more damage was done... lol I bought another 0 ring from NAPA.

BTW, the factory replaced the nylon/plastic front sight/bbl band with steel ones long ago, my ATV Henry has plastic and it still works just fine, so i never bothered to replace it.

DM

crestoncowboy
April 23, 2013, 08:03 PM
Growing up i used to shoot a brick every sunday through one of the west german Ithaca 72 rifles that got henry on the map, they last. however comparing one to the browning, marlin, or Winchester is laughable. Also I wouldn't go to a henry forum to ask about a henry, (or a glock forum to ask about a glock, or a Camaro forum to ask about a Camaro etc...) as someone suggested, you will most likely get a biased opinion,
In the book to one of my h001 rifles it says the new rifles draw from the heritage of the rifle given to president Lincoln. So yes they blatantly lie about their name, and that is my biggest problem with the company. However If you buy one im sure it will be a decent shooter, and give very little trouble.

BCRider
April 23, 2013, 08:56 PM
My "problem" is that I've simply got too many fun .22 rifles. Not to mention a bunch of other guns. And not to mention other hobbies that keep me away from the range. And they all need some time. Otherwise I'm sure that my Henry would see 3000 a summer.

Yes, the special intrest forums are biased. Asking how everyone likes their guns, motorcycles, cars, boats, etc is the very LAST thing you want to do. When I look at these forums I tend to look at the ratio of thead postings related to problems or difficulties vs happy experiences. One has to read between the lines a little with this sort of thing.

shafter
April 23, 2013, 10:15 PM
In the Henry H001 series owners manual it says "We are proud to have crafted this rifle for you in the great tradition of Henry Repeating Arms Company which dates back to 1860 when the first effective, lever-action repeating rifle was developed by our founder, Benjamin Tyler Henry".

That statement is a complete lie... The “Henry Repeating Arms Company” was founded in NY in 1996. The company Benjamin Tyler Henry founded was the “New Haven Arms Company” in CT whose name was changed to the “Winchester Repeating Arms Company” in 1866. The Folks at Henry must not have much respect for their gun buying customers to lie to them in this way... Or, they just assume that we are too ignorant to know any better.

Quote:
BTW, name a firearms company that when you call and the president of the company answers the phone, it happens quite often at HRAC. Cliff
I care more about the lack of a loading gate, 3 extra pounds of useless metal and a company that lies to it customers than I do about who answers the phone.

My sentiments EXACTLY!

Bushpilot
April 24, 2013, 12:04 AM
The current Springfield Armory has nothing to to do with the old government arsenal and new Rock Island stuff is from overseas. So, it isn't a new idea to use a defunct famous name.

Very true, but Springfield Armory (the company) goes on to explain what the original Springfield Armory was, that it closed in 1968 and that in 1974 the Reese family resurrected the name and the "philosophy" behind it. They don't however claim that George Washington and Henry Knox (who ordered the creation of Springfield Armory and chose the site) "founded" their company in 1777. Big difference compared to Henry...

eastbank
April 24, 2013, 09:37 AM
i don,t knock any one for buying what rifle they want and when the henry,s were cheaper by alot it may have made sense to some,but when they are as high or higher than other named rimfire or centerfire rifles that are made of steel the shine on them dims. eastbank.

jolly roger
April 24, 2013, 09:59 AM
I have an octagon 22 that is wonderful for it's purpose. I don't get the Big Boy either though. For something that heavy I want a cartridge with thump..like a Guide Gun

DM~
April 24, 2013, 10:06 AM
i don,t knock any one for buying what rifle they want and when the henry,s were cheaper by alot it may have made sense to some,but when they are as high or higher than other named rimfire or centerfire rifles that are made of steel the shine on them dims. eastbank.

I looked at 39's before buying a Henry, but one thing about buying a new Henry, at least i didn't have to go to the Marlin 39 forum to get the info to make it work RIGHT, right out of the box.

All three of my Henrys worked perfectly right out of the box and still do. Also, the Henrys are trimmer, lighter and smoother too and i like that a LOT.....so do the smaller kids that shoot them. :)

If i wanted to carry a tank around, i'd carry one of my 22 target guns...

DM

Hagen442
April 24, 2013, 10:56 AM
Old 2 Cents:
I am referring to Centerfire Calibers not 22 Rimfire.
Ck Out a Uberti before you decide on a Henry Arms.
The 1860 Henry Clone from Uberti is a beauty with a lot of heart not just a name.(Been using a 45 Long Colt 1860 Uberti Henry for a bunch of years)
(We Run a lot of Rounds with Uberti Long Guns in Cowboy Action)
http://i1022.photobucket.com/albums/af341/HAGEN442/1860_henry_rifle.jpg (http://s1022.photobucket.com/user/HAGEN442/media/1860_henry_rifle.jpg.html)

00

blueskyjaunte
April 24, 2013, 03:17 PM
I don't own a Henry, but I have played with a few of 'em.

I'd trade my jam-o-matic Marlin 1895CB for a Henry--any Henry!--in a heartbeat. :banghead:

shafter
April 24, 2013, 06:55 PM
If I was going to buy a "Henry" that's what I'd go for Hagen.

black_powder_Rob
April 24, 2013, 07:56 PM
Hagen that is also the Henry I would want, i just wish they made one in 357-38 spec.

I do however have a Henry 22mag frontier rifle that I love.

mr.t7024
April 24, 2013, 09:48 PM
I like all three of the rifles,To me they all function equally,shoot just as accurate.

Keep in mind made in the tradition of, is not the same as made the same way. If one does not like a rifle because of the name...do not buy it. I refuse to buy a Remington rifle because of the fiasco they had with the 597... . We all have opinions, it is what it is. But we can all have fun shooting!

BTW my go to gun is my Marlin 60, made in the early 60's.:) Cliff

Searcher4851
April 25, 2013, 10:14 AM
The Henry is a nice looking, well put together, smooth functioning out of the box, rifle. They are currently high priced for me, but my price point may be different than yours. I own one but acquired it when they weren't so high priced. It's a really nice rifle, shoots well, and weighs more than I like to carry for long periods. It is not a reproduction of anything, but that doesn't make it bad.
I also have shot a couple of Marlin 1894's (pre Remlin) and own some Rossi 92's. The Rossi's get shot the most, and considering the price, I can purty near buy two Rossi's for the price of a Henry nowadays. Next lever purchase will probably be another Rossi.
It all boils down to what do YOU want and like? The Henry is a nice rifle. I also have a Henry .22lr that I shoot all the time. It works for me.

alman
April 25, 2013, 05:15 PM
Just a word about the ZAMAC alloy receiver ; Bought a new H001 , out the door under $300 . Stripped the reciever cover , polished it sealed it & called it good . Looks great , functions flawlessly and is ACCURATE . Im a Marlin fanboy but would not spend $600.00+ on a new "Remlin" 39a & the vintage ones are just as expensive if not more . Great value with the henry rimfires ...

mountain_man
April 25, 2013, 06:29 PM
I may be wrong but I was under the impression that the receiver is steel, and the only ZAMAC parts are the receiver covers. Is that correct? A quick test with the covers off and a magnet will tell.

alman
April 26, 2013, 03:11 AM
Yes , reciever cover only .

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

eastbank
April 26, 2013, 07:34 AM
the henry,s with the steel cover remind me of the german erma .22 levers ithica sold and i think iver johnson sold them and a pump made the same way. i wonder if the newer henry,s are one in the same. eastbank.

Double Vision
April 28, 2013, 07:20 PM
Thanks for your input guys.

The local store actually came down from $849 to $799, but I was still a bit hesitant to drop 8 bills on the Henry in 38/357 at this time.
I'm to pick up an XD in a week so when I'm feeling more flush with funds I'll likely spring for the Henry.

Thank you.

InertiaDriven71
May 23, 2013, 10:06 PM
The plastic front sight/barrel band wasn't molded correctly so it always leaned slightly to one side.

Mine had the same issue, but not too bad to where it affects shooting. I also asked for a replacement metal barrel band to replace the plastic one. They did so for free--great customer service. I am not a hater, because I want to support the company.

That said, my Henry 16" .22 lever carbine (H001l) hangs up from time to time-- way too often for a "critter rifle"-- the nose of the round coming from the magazine gets thrown up too high (above the chamber) where it jams in the receiver. I would love to know how to fix it without having to use a pocket knife to work the round into the chamber each time it happens.

Plus, the receiver looks cheap-- the scratches on the receiver look worse that typically is on blued steel. Not equal in all respects. Not even close to a 9422.

HOWEVER, I love the 16" barrel, cowboy loop lever, and I will say that it is accurate and affordable. However, I would drop it and pay double for a 9422 if Winchester made a 16" carbine.

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