Breaking down a BP revolver completely for cleaning


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ChasMack
April 24, 2013, 03:06 PM
I was reading here about cleaning methods and a couple of times read where people completely break their revolvers down once a year or so. Sounds like a good thing to do but is it actually necessary? I ask because if it is, I need to buy a cheap, very used bp revolver to practice. I have a Uberti 1873 and tried taking the grip frame and grips off and parts popped out and I had a heck of a time trying to get things back in the frame and finally took it to someone I knew who put it back together again :)

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The-Reaver
April 24, 2013, 04:29 PM
I strip my ROA down to the bone every time she goes out.

I scrub and scub. Soak in soap and water. Scub some more.

Dishwasher when wife not around. Scrub oil put back together. Bore butter reload no caps.

BSA1
April 24, 2013, 05:03 PM
It is not necessary to detail strip firearms that you shoot black powder out of.

The secret word you need to know when cleaning and oiling your gun is BALLISTOL. Just squirt some into the action every time you clean your gun and it will keep any gunk in it soft and rust free. I have shot many thousands, 11,000+, rounds and never had any problems.

Driftwood Johnson
April 24, 2013, 09:24 PM
Howdy

I agree, it is not necessary to take a gun apart every time you shoot Black Powder in it. BP fouling that has been saturated with oil will not absorb moisture from the air and will not cause rust. This is heresy to some, but it is true. I am one of those guys who shoots my Colts with Black Powder all year long in CAS, cleaning them every time, but I probably don't even take them apart once a year these days. I am sure to always squirt some of my favorite , rust preventing BP solvent down inside while cleaning, followed by a squirt of Ballistol.

I also recommend against cleaning guns in a dishwasher that you use to clean the dishes your family eats off of. You will be leaving some lead behind.

Every time I do take them apart, there is always plenty of oily black gunk down inside, there is never any rust. If you can live with oily, black gunk down inside, it is not necessary to take them apart.

However, you really should learn how to take your guns apart and put them back together again. It is not all that hard, there are plenty of resources around to help you.

Captain*kirk
April 24, 2013, 11:26 PM
I'm one of those who do a complete strip and cleaning each & every time I have a gun out.
Is it necessary?Maybe not. But my guns are clean, lubed, free of cap frags, powder deposits, rust, oil fouling and spider webs. They don't jam, misfire, or do squib loads.
Do I need to to a complete teardown each time? You be the judge.
One added thing; You might fumble and get frustrated trying to tear your gun now, but using my method you can tear them down blindfolded, in the dark, at night. You don't ask "Where does this go?" or "How does this fit/work/etc?" You take them apart and put them back together without incident, and you know they're gonna work.

swathdiver
April 25, 2013, 01:08 AM
We do complete teardowns unless we know they'll be shot again within a week.

Hellgate
April 25, 2013, 01:28 PM
I'm with Driftwood. As long as the fouling down inside is not interfering with gun function it is harmless. A few drops of oil du jour down inside and up the trigger slot will keep the innards rust free for years in spite of the oily black mush. I do the barrel, frame, & cylinder but the innards get a bath every year or two depending on how much it is shot.

Crawdad1
April 25, 2013, 02:35 PM
I unscrew and pull the brass trigger guard and backstrap off the revolver and soak the frame in a bucket of hot soapy water with a little dishwashing detergent added then scrub with an old toothbrush and brass clean brush to get it clean. A dunk in just a bucket of hot water then spray it liberally with WD-40. Then wipe it down with a rag to get the excess WD-40 off then oil it. Every so often I'll take it down completely and clean everything like the hand and cylinder bolt and spring and such, but only just so often.

Fingers McGee
April 25, 2013, 07:42 PM
What Drifteood and Hellgate said +1. I only do a complete teardown a couple times a year. After a thousand rounds or so. Balistol and fouling combine to make a pretty good grease in the actions.

cwo2lt
April 26, 2013, 03:17 PM
[QUOTE]We do complete teardowns unless we know they'll be shot again within a week./QUOTE]

+1. I've never used the dishwasher, mostly because she'd tell me to wash it my own d@#$ self, but I do use her hair dryer.

Cosmoline
April 26, 2013, 03:23 PM
I don't but on some of the ones I rarely shoot, I probably should.

jldee55
April 26, 2013, 07:23 PM
MY Colts not always, Remmys usually..

Driftwood Johnson
April 26, 2013, 08:02 PM
I'm one of those who do a complete strip and cleaning each & every time I have a gun out.
Is it necessary?Maybe not. But my guns are clean, lubed, free of cap frags, powder deposits, rust, oil fouling and spider webs. They don't jam, misfire, or do squib loads.

Howdy Again

Frankly, my guns do not jam, misfire, or suffer from squib loads either. Nor do they have spider webs in them. Fully stripping them down every time is not necessary to avoid those problems.

The other reason I do not tear down my guns any more often than is really necessary is because it puts extra wear and tear on the screws. An excellent opportunity to bugger up the screw heads and maybe even cross thread the screw holes if one is not careful.

The bottom line is, if you cannot abide some fouling deep down inside, then go right ahead and strip them down every time. If you understand the fact that BP fouling saturated with oil cannot cause rust, and you don't have to do a white glove inspection of your guns, then just tear them apart once a year or so.

woodnbow
April 26, 2013, 09:42 PM
I haven't done a white glove inspection since they invented CLP. When I started in BP, I used hot water and soap in the barrel and cylinder and then squirt CLP into the frame. The stuff says it cleans lubes and protects and it works just as advertised. These days I use cold water followed by one of a variety of protectants with equally good results.

ontarget
April 27, 2013, 09:31 PM
Don't know about the remmies, but the colts are so simple to strip completely, why not? Mine get the full tear down every time they go out.

J-Bar
April 27, 2013, 09:41 PM
"Honey, do you want to go the mall with me this afternoon?"

"No, sorry, you know I gotta get these guns apart and cleaned before they rust. Go on without me, dear."

(heh, heh, heh ....)

swathdiver
April 27, 2013, 11:33 PM
"Honey, do you want to go the mall with me this afternoon?"

"No, sorry, you know I gotta get these guns apart and cleaned before they rust. Go on without me, dear."

(heh, heh, heh ....)
Nothing like hours of peace and quiet after a relaxing day of making smoke! hehehe

Hellgate
April 28, 2013, 03:27 PM
Swathdiver,
I remember utilizing the aura of brimstone (BP smell) as a nice wife & kids repellent while cleaning guns after a shoot. I often look at gun cleaning (w/o a total breakdown) as "afterglow" from a good shooting match where quiet reflection/meditation is welcome.

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