So, Say You've Got A Safe Queen...


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Tophernj
April 25, 2013, 09:07 AM
How do you gents prep her for storage?

I have only one gun that I won't be shooting a lot. It's, to me, more of an heirloom piece. So, she'll be living in the safe. As of right now, I have cleaned her well and wiped down with WD-40 as I know it's a water dispersant. Is that basically it? I figure I'll take her out once every 3-4 months and give her a wipe down with a cleaner and then hit her with some more WD.

Unless you folks have any other suggestions. If the WD is a bad idea, please let me know asap. And, if so, what are your recommendations?

Thanks.

C

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JTQ
April 25, 2013, 09:23 AM
I think there are very few of us that use WD-40 on our guns. it has a reputation for hardening, especially after long term inactivity, and gumming up small moving parts. Those of us that do use WD-40 on our guns, may use it to displace water after a gun is dunked in the water as a short term water displacer, but the WD-40 gets cleaned off as soon as practical.

ku4hx
April 25, 2013, 09:27 AM
I've done exactly what you're done since about 1959 with my first gun. I've never had a problem with non cumulative surface applications of WD-40 although I've heard some people have. But every gun I own gets a wipe down every couple of months so that may be a factor. I can tell you, accumulated WD-40 will gum things up over time.

Lately, after initial wipe down with WD-40, I've been using various silicone cloths to wipe with. They were free, easy and come in a plastic bag. I also like Remoil for internal lube on some guns and Sheath/Barricade for occasional wipe down. The thing about Sheath is it dries to a non oily coating which is good for trips to colder climates.

The thing is, all oils and preservatives have a useful coating lifetime. I've seen studies on that and some do better than others. I just clean 'em good, lube as the makers suggests and periodically give 'em a good fondling. Safe queens need love too. That and dry air.

HOOfan_1
April 25, 2013, 10:16 AM
Breakfree makes a specific formula called "collector" designed for use on guns stored for over 5 years. Eezox also seems to be popular

Sam1911
April 25, 2013, 10:19 AM
Collector is said to be nice. I use RIG grease a lot, and it is a fantastic long-term protectant.

I would steer heavily away from WD-40. Used it a lot as a kid. We didn't know any better. Won't use it now except for water-displacement...and I don't even use it for that. Its worst problems seem to arise with long-term use, which is exactly what you're doing.

98Redline
April 25, 2013, 11:00 AM
Eezox is what I use. Spray on, lightly wipe down and allow to air dry. Good to go.

This is incidently what I use on my blued CCW pieces. I have yet to see even the smallest freckle of rust, even after a week riding around in a sweaty IWB holster in the summer heat.

Because of the spray on nature and the low viscosity, it tends to do a very nice job of penetrating into all of the nooks and crannies that tend to pick up corrosion during long term storage.

rklessdriver
April 25, 2013, 11:05 AM
I use RIG.

Olympus
April 25, 2013, 11:13 AM
By all means, lose the WD-40! It will work in a pinch in field conditions, but that's the only time is recommend it. Get yourself a true gun oil and protectant. It's not like the stuff costs a lot of money.

I have several safe queens. My method is to completely wipe then off with a dry cloth and then completely spray them liberally with protectant. I hold them by the grip only and make sure my hands never touch any metal after. They stay perfect for years without being touched again.

But I also use a golden rod dehumidifier in my safe also.

jmr40
April 25, 2013, 11:28 AM
Wd40 is better than nothing. There are better choices

Fishbed77
April 25, 2013, 11:38 AM
I think there are very few of us that use WD-40 on our guns. it has a reputation for hardening, especially after long term inactivity, and gumming up small moving parts.

Yep. WD40 is a no-no for firearms.

My brother inherited a Winchester 77 from my grandfather that had been stored with a liberal application of WD40. Over the years (maybe 15) the WD40 hardened into a hard lacquer-like substance that was next to impossible to remove from the trigger assembly and bolt (even with brake cleaner!).

I'm not sure if my brother ever got it completely removed.

bannockburn
April 25, 2013, 11:41 AM
I have always thought of WD-40 as being more of a solvent/water dispersement product that really doesn't offer any kind of long term protection to a gun. For long term storage I use RIG grease and a silicone cloth.

stonecutter2
April 25, 2013, 02:09 PM
I use Outers gun oil and I've never had a rust problem. I saw a great comparison of products sometime back and Eezox won hands down.

HOOfan_1
April 25, 2013, 02:34 PM
Yep. WD40 is a no-no for firearms.


WD40 is just fine...if used correctly. It isn't always the best option, but it won't instantly melt your guns like some people seem to think.

I can just hear chairs tip over as people recoil from their computer in fright when WD40 is mentioned on a gun message board.

X-Rap
April 25, 2013, 02:59 PM
My family has used WD-40 since it was sold to the public and I have never seen residue or crud built up from its use. There are some very good gun products and I use them as well. The guns that go in my safe all get a good rub down with a rag that is generously sprayed with WD-40, CLP, Rem Oil or what ever oil, lube, preservative is handy when it needs re soaked.
In a humid environment I would use desiccant or dehumidifier and give a shot of oil and wipe down every couple months. Since you say it is an heirloom, how has it been cared for up to now? If the gun is in good shape I would continue with what has worked.

Tophernj
April 25, 2013, 04:42 PM
Thanks all for the replies.

I am fully aware of the potential of WD to become very hard. That's why I asked about other products. I am going to look into the RIG grease.

As to the "heirloom" thing... the gun is new. It's a 1918 repop Colt. Absolutely gorgeous. I would like to leave it to my family as, the way things are currently going, it may be the most valuable thing I leave behind. Regardless, I would like to leave it in good shape for someone behind me, if you know what I mean.

Any other suggestions, comments are most certainly welcome.

C

This is "her" by the way:

rodinal220
April 25, 2013, 05:45 PM
Zerust bags have worked for me.

http://www.zerustproducts.com/firearms-weapons/?zenid=0a8b01db5ec0e2d545ba3a49777fa7aa

Fremmer
April 25, 2013, 09:32 PM
So after applying the rig do you store the pistol in a plastic bag or gun sock, or what?

ch45x7
April 25, 2013, 10:53 PM
WD40 is great for around the house but it turns to crud when it sits because it collects dust, so its not great for firearm storage.
Clean off the WD40 and give it a good cleaning with CLP. Get a good gun lube, I use kellube and it works amazingly well, and oil the few spots a 1911 need. Once done and the pistol is clean and wiped down, put it in a silicon impregnated gun sock or gun rug.
I've done this with rifles and pistols handed down to me and have yet to see a spot of rust on them. Some have been in storage for several years and I haven't had to do anything to them.

OilyPablo
April 25, 2013, 11:43 PM
Corrosion X. Most all True Value stores carry it. Spray it and keep the gun dry and it will be fine. Spray every 3-4 months if the humidity isn't controlled.

Sam1911
April 26, 2013, 08:35 AM
... put it in a silicon impregnated gun sock or gun rug.

Ooohhh, no no. Don't put it in gun rug! Those are for transporting only! They KILL finishes on guns all the time. The archives here have horror stories about folks who opened a gun rug to find their treasured firearm coated with rust with the fabric or pile of the gun rug adhering to the corroding metal.

The BEST thing for a gun is to place it on a hard, dry surface where air can circulate around it. A shelf or rack in a safe is perfect. Don't wrap it up, let it breathe.

Skillet
April 26, 2013, 09:24 PM
just put her in a ziploc bag filled with motor oil, that's what gun companies do nowadays anyhow hahaha

g_one
April 26, 2013, 09:30 PM
Breakfree (company that makes CLP) has a slightly altered formula specially designed for long term storage that I highly recommend. Either that or just good old fashioned 5w40. I'd stay away from WD40 even if it weren't an heirloom piece.

redneck2
April 27, 2013, 09:20 AM
Used to work part time at the LGS. Guy brought in a 50's vintage Colt. Never fired. We pulled it out of the original storage box and the backside was totally rusted and pitted. Never store anything in a soft case. Holds humidity.

I use RIG.

Ed Ames
April 27, 2013, 09:35 AM
I have often wondered what conditions cause problems with wd40. I don't doubt people have had issues with it but at the same time I've dealt with guns that received regular wd40 soakings since at least the mid-1960s - 50 years of wd40 exposure - and didn't have issues. What's the difference? I'm not sure.

Anyway...

For multi-year long-term storage:

Vacuum bags (tilla food saver type bags) will puncture themselves on the sharp edges of most guns.
If the bags don't start leaking from self-punctures, they will leave a pattern on the bluing that goes away with oiling but can be quite disconcerting.
Both of those concerns are eliminated if you put the gun in a "bore store" (http://www.borestores.com) before vacuum bagging.
Vacuum bags are still vulnerable to physical damage, but can be cushioned with an outer sock.
I have opened a socked/vacuum bagged/bore stored pistol after 10 years in a safe with zero human contact. That pistol was, as far as I could tell, unchanged after 10 years of storage. No rust, no cracking wood, no dings.
You can buy oxygen absorbing discs which are normally used in food storage. I didn't use them when I wrapped up a few guns many years ago, but might today.

That's what I did. Of course I had the vacuum bagger on hand and there may have been a bit of, "everything is a nail," going on.

If you will want to take out and fondle the gun every few months, RIG works.

loose noose
April 27, 2013, 08:23 PM
Until CLP became readily available I used WD-40 on a rag and wiped my firearms down, note I've had many of my weapons for 45 Years and never did I detect any rust or finish destroyed nor did I ever notice any build up of varnish type substance. Believe me I have quite a few "safe queens" in my collection and until recently that was my main solvent/perservative. I now reccomend CLP or a silicon rag to wipe down a firearm. Just my thoughts, as I can't believe the number of people that say WD40 is evil.:D

wally
April 28, 2013, 01:10 PM
Break-free CLP has never let me down and I've guns in the safe I haven't shot in 30+ years.

5-SHOTS
April 28, 2013, 02:26 PM
For long term storage I slightly prefer Ballistol over WD40; I cover all the internal and external of my blued guns with Ballistol and I put them in little transparent plastic shoppers, just like many guns are shipped to gun shops. That works well for me. However I check all my guns at least once a month.

OilyPablo
April 28, 2013, 04:26 PM
In Europe does Ballistol have a different formula for storage? I would never in a million years trust my guns to Ballistol for storage. It's probably good that you check them once a month and keep them wet with it.

Ballistol doesn't do very well in rust testing and when it dries, it's pretty nasty. Gels, then hardens. But is cleanable.

5-SHOTS
April 29, 2013, 11:03 AM
In Europe does Ballistol have a different formula for storage? I would never in a million years trust my guns to Ballistol for storage. It's probably good that you check them once a month and keep them wet with it.

Ballistol doesn't do very well in rust testing and when it dries, it's pretty nasty. Gels, then hardens. But is cleanable.

I use the classic (since 1904) Ballistol (it smells like grass) and what I like is that it gels and hardens. But if I touch it, it suddenly becomes liquid again. I also use it when I want a gun ready to go at the range after months, because it keeps all the internals lubed for long time. I didn't use my Weihrauch revolver for 4 or 5 monts and when I finally took it at the range it was still wet and lubed; I was checking it with regularity but not re-lubing it after inspections. I think however that the plastic bags I use are 50% of the result. This is my experience, others may vary. Using the WD-40 I had a similar experience, I only think the Ballistol works a nail better.

tercel89
April 29, 2013, 04:33 PM
I use RIG for preserving my best guns.

Collects
April 29, 2013, 07:54 PM
Eezox, followed by Renaissance Wax.

First, unload the revolver and remove the stocks. Next, liberally spray Eezox into every opening - up the gripframe, into the area around the hammer and the trigger (both hammer up and hammer down). The Eezox should run out of various openings, and most likely you will see brown "gunk" coming out of the revolver. I then wait for the Eezox to dry, and carefully wipe down the revolver. Eezox, when wet, is a solvent. Eezox, when dry, is a pretty good lubricant as well as rust preventative, so there is no need to apply any grease or oil. I like to finish the cleaning with one to three coats of Renaissance Wax.

While the stocks are off, consider washing them in warm water using Murphy's Oil Soap, let dry, then saturate with Pledge Furniture Revitalizing Oil (or other good wood care product), wipe down, let dry, then apply one to three coats of Renaissance Wax (wipe on a small amount, let dry, then wipe or polish off) and finally reinstall the stocks. Make sure to use the right size hollow ground screwdriver for stock removal/installation.

This cleaning regime will clean and protect the revolver from rust, and will frequenlty make a heavy/stiff trigger operate the way a Colt trigger is supposed to operate, or a stiffly rotating cylinder rotate freely, or a tight crane made to operate properly. If something is wrong mechanically with the revolver, of course a cleaning and lubrication regime will not fix the problem.

Fishslayer
May 2, 2013, 02:26 PM
Corrosion X. Most all True Value stores carry it. Spray it and keep the gun dry and it will be fine. Spray every 3-4 months if the humidity isn't controlled.

I'm also a fan of CorrosionX. It's kept my fishing reels from rusting in a saltwater environment for years. When I take one apart that's been sitting a long time the stuff is still where it should be and hasn't turned into a gummy mess.

Also a "No" here to gun rugs and foam cases for storage. I like the silicone socks though, mostly to prevent handling damage going into & out of the safe.

The owner of my LGS has been into guns a looooong time & he swears by WD-40. I would agree with the other poster that there are better products. :shrug:

Stevie-Ray
May 4, 2013, 01:29 AM
CLP and RIG.

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