How do you know when your not a newb?


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Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 05:58 PM
i figured everyone could have a good time with this one...feel free to laugh at my expense...how does one know when theyve crossed the line from "newb" to rookie (or whatever the stages of development are)...i do think i can not accidentally shoot myself now..is that enough? Been shootin 3 months, 3 range trips... feel free to share any newb storys.....someone i know tried to insert ammo into the clip backwards...i swear it was just someone i know :)

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OptimusPrime
April 25, 2013, 06:00 PM
As soon as you regret buying or selling something.

JohnBT
April 25, 2013, 06:07 PM
Or when you sell something and later buy it back.

Or when you reassemble your first 1911 and take out 2 overhead 4' bulbs with the recoil spring plug. :o

There are lots of different ways.

larryh1108
April 25, 2013, 06:18 PM
When you call it a magazine instead of a clip. That means you've graduated to firearms 102

mljdeckard
April 25, 2013, 06:20 PM
If it means you have learned all you need to know and you can stop training.......never.

Lex Luthier
April 25, 2013, 06:22 PM
I was taught that we should always be "in the middle". That means to me that I should always have a mentor while being a mentor. Approaching all our life interests this way helps us remain not only a teacher, but teachable.

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 06:28 PM
Ahhh...wise you are Lex

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 06:31 PM
i havent done anything to stupid....well i do know someone who caused about 6 people to duck at the range when they turned around and swept the line with the barrel of the gun after shooting at the targets...it was my sister...yea

USAF_Vet
April 25, 2013, 06:36 PM
When you can identify the differences between a barrel shroud and the shoulder thing that goes up, you are no longer a newb.

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 06:41 PM
what the heck is that LOL (but really)

bikerdoc
April 25, 2013, 06:42 PM
When you start answering more questions than you ask.

Neo-Luddite
April 25, 2013, 06:42 PM
When you cease to believe stool-sitting gun shop BS stories....but are somehow kind enough to listen and nod if it's a store you like to shop and hang out in.

USAF_Vet
April 25, 2013, 06:44 PM
what the heck is that LOL (but really)
Ask Representative McCarthy
http://youtu.be/ospNRk2uM3U

EddieG54
April 25, 2013, 06:50 PM
When you stop telling your gun buddies at double barrel shotgun is all you need for home defense.:neener:

Lantern
April 25, 2013, 07:03 PM
Hmmmm... newb story. I got the one that FORCED a lifelong respect for guns and treating them as if they are always loaded....annnnd to keep my finger off the trigger annnnd to keep the end pointed in a safe direction.

I was about 12 and squirrel hunting with a 22/410 over under. I had a few squirrels and there was lull in the action. So I started the sit down stand up game of fidgeting. Got tired of holding the gun and rested it on its butt while I was resting MY butt while holding it near the "middle". Decided to stand back up and used the gun for extra leverage and BOOM! Fat hand squeezing around the trigger guard pulled the trigger down. Muzzle was right beside my head. Nobody was hurt except my pride. It was dead as a doornail.:uhoh::uhoh:

Since that day I've been called out for being "too cautious". I LIKE being called out for it. Tells me I haven't forgotten what can happen.

CarolinaChuck
April 25, 2013, 07:07 PM
Interesting question, I grew up around them so I don't really remember feeling like that. I still learn and forget things, relearn and retrain, if that is what you want to call it. I would say it is a life long learning experience.

I will say I had friend whom I grew up with that shot himself with a sidearm that was not working properly. I remember taking a hunters safety course as a teen where one point was made not to use a firearm that wasn't working properly. My friend was the older brother of the kid I took the course with, so we both knew better.

My point is, don't learn lessons the hard way while on your trip to old age. It was hard to make the call to his father, a man I grew up respecting, that I brought his son to the hospital because we were stupid. In the end only my friends' pride was hurt. Funny thing was, the father knew me and could read the tone in my voice concerning the matter and knew eveything was well in hand; the only question the man asked me was, "was he quick drawing?"

CarolinaChuck

c4v3man
April 25, 2013, 07:14 PM
someone i know tried to insert ammo into the clip backwards
It's ok if you have a HK... They're so reliable it doesn't matter!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v318/BiggBore/badHKbrochuresmall.jpg
http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/590631/fullsize/img_0523.jpg

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 07:21 PM
When you start answering more questions than you ask.

Thats a good one there doc. Since ive joined this forum ive asked about 8 and answered ZERO. Guess i havent crossed the threshold yet!

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 07:25 PM
Ask Representative McCarthy

Hilarious..sad too

Texan Scott
April 25, 2013, 07:28 PM
When the only glaringly obvious mistakes in your posts are usually the misuse of "your" and "you're"...

And you can shrug it off when people point this out. ;)

bigfatdave
April 25, 2013, 07:30 PM
When you know the magazine/clip difference.
When you know your/you're. (also there/their/they're)
When you've seen most of the questions. (congratulations on a new question, actually)

Snark aside,
When you start answering more questions than you ask.
is a pretty good answer.

"When you know the internal workings of most of your guns well enough to troubleshoot them"
Might be part of the answer

Uttering the phrase "oh crap, I need a bigger gun container"

c4v3man
April 25, 2013, 07:33 PM
Go observe an IDPA/IPSC/USPSA competition, then compete at the next one. If you make it through a match without any safety critiquing from the RO, then you're not a newb. You'll be a grinning novice who can't wait to come back.

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 07:33 PM
When you know the internal workings of most of your guns well enough to troubleshoot them

yikes!! i'm a long way from there!

Akita1
April 25, 2013, 07:34 PM
When you're helping others at the range, if not for benevolence...for your own safety!

Potatohead
April 25, 2013, 07:38 PM
When you know the magazine/clip difference

There's a difference? LOL (but really, whats the difference)
Also: did i get my "there's" right? Just making sure im moving in the right direction:)

ball3006
April 25, 2013, 07:38 PM
when I pulled my first trigger on my Dad's 16 ga Model 12. It gave me a bloody nose. I felt a nube when I sat on my first deer stand at 10 years old and whined I was cold. That was a long time ago. I am 69....chris3

316SS
April 25, 2013, 08:11 PM
If you have to ask ... your a newb ;) And their you have it. :D

Agsalaska
April 25, 2013, 08:30 PM
When you have to buy a second safe;)

bri
April 25, 2013, 09:01 PM
When you stop calling newbs, "newbs.". :)

hunttheevil
April 25, 2013, 09:18 PM
When you learn how to use the search function! :neener:

Theraztastic
April 25, 2013, 09:48 PM
I think gun safety and being a "newb" are two different things. Whether or not you claim to be new to guns or an expert everyone needs to practice safety when dealing with any kind of firearms. I have shot with people who didn't know anything about guns and always checked the chamber/used trigger discipline, etc. I also have a friend who knows a lot about guns that shot his roommate in the chest with his AR in their house. That being said, if you have a lot of interest in guns than eventually you will cross the "newb" threshold due to experience from shooting and knowledge gained from talking with other shooters or researching topics that you are interested in. But there are a lot of different opinions on what products are the best or what strategies work better. Take those with a grain of salt and form your own opinions.

tyeo098
April 25, 2013, 09:59 PM
You're no longer a newb when you built your first firearm.

AR/AK/DP-28

If you understand it enough to BUILD one, you are no longer a newbie.

Teachu2
April 25, 2013, 10:00 PM
i do think i can not accidentally shoot myself now..is that enough?

Nope - when you realize that anytime you have a firearm you can accidentally shoot youself, then you are not a newb....

CapnMac
April 26, 2013, 03:30 AM
When you call it a magazine instead of a clip.

Dunno, I remember watching a person attempting to fill a Garand en bloc backwards. The near-by attempting to offer assistance being some flummoxed by the erstwhile shooter protesting that eight rounds was "Too many bullets!"

Which ranks right up there with the person who kept trying to load their SKS magazine by removing it (no, it had not been fitted with an AK mag adapter). it was sad. I tried to explain, too--"But, tha' ain' the way theys do's it on TV!" I even had been clip-loading the M1A I was shooting that day. Clues were for sale, cheap; but Sparky was not buying any.

Which only caused me to remember, back in my noob days, just how long it took in my stubbornness, to learn that the Enfield Nr 4 is a rifles with many virtues, but a tactically-removable magazine is not one of them.

Now, to my thinking, you start to stop being a THR noob about the time you stop having to go look up acronyms and initialisms. Or, about the time you recognize "who" a person is by their THR handle before reading any of the content.

Blackstone
April 26, 2013, 06:25 AM
When you don't try to chamber a 9mm in a 7.6521mm gun.

When you don't accidentally shoot a 9mm out of a .40

When you don't try and stick .40 into a 9mm (how do you even fit the .40 into a 9mm mag)

These are all the things my friends have done ;). In their defence, they had a few Sphinx 2000/3000s in the group that were chambered in various calibres so they easily got confused.

tomrkba
April 26, 2013, 06:50 AM
It is probably when you start teaching. This can be as simple as pointing out a bad grip to showing someone their gun is accurate (just not in their hands) and you show them the trick of it. Correct their technique. If their group sizes drop during the remainder of the session, you did well.

Take five or more two to four day gun courses. Spend at least one hour a night studying shooting and perusing manufacturer websites. Read lots of gun forums, books and articles. Reload large amounts of ammunition. Attend a few competitions and pay attention to the "tech" talk. Be able to shoot tiny groups with your favorite gun (or consistently break 20+ out of 25 targets). Teach others about your favorite gun related topic. Get one NRA instructor certification. Buy a handgun that looks interesting, setup the reloader and see how fast you can put 5,000 rounds through it while documenting every step. Ten years down the road, you will look back and wonder why it took you so long to shoot 100,000+ rounds.

MichigammeDave
April 26, 2013, 08:33 AM
I'm with 316SS. If you're wondering if you're still a newb, you probably are. At some point, you begin to realize you fit in and are one of the group, and then you're not a newb anymore.
Welcome aboard.

JFtheGR8
April 26, 2013, 10:54 AM
As far as the majority of this crowd goes I'll always be a newb. The wealth of firearm knowledge here is staggering.


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rdhood
April 26, 2013, 11:07 AM
1) You handle a weapon without committing a major safety violation (muzzle pointed in the wrong direction, finger on trigger, etc)
2) You know the difference between: a bullet and a cartridge, a magazine and a clip. When you know all the major parts of your firearm.
3) You can field strip and clean your firearms without a manual
4) You can troubleshoot your firearms.
5) You can feel the trigger. You display trigger control both in the pull and release. You can feel the reset.
6) For rifles, you can shoot expert on AQT. I believe nearly anybody can do so if they practice and try. I am sure that their are corollary skills for pistols and shotguns.


I no longer consider myself a newb for rifle. I have built 3 AKs from kits (including bending my own receivers), 2 ARs. I shoot expert on AQT (I have done three weekend courses) . I reload rifle rounds. I plan to do a carbine course soon.

For pistol and shotgun.... I am still fairly green. Sure, I know the ins and outs of my guns, but shooting skill is just not there... YET.


I have been shooting for about 6 years.

Certaindeaf
April 26, 2013, 11:22 AM
The cool thing about knowledgeable shooters is that they are helpful.. in real life and not, not boastful, and know they'll never know it all. Keep on keepin' on without shooting yourself or others accidentally and have fun (and hit the target)!

Comrade Mike
April 26, 2013, 11:23 AM
When you go to your first IDPA match ever and win the unclassified bracket by a 15 point margin, and then qualify expert. With a borrowed gun ;)

Missed master by a couple points... That pissed me off.

Or when you don't shoot your mosin firing pin through your drop ceiling in the basement later that day.... Did I mention I collect mosins? Even the best of us have oopsies.....

MagnunJoe
April 26, 2013, 11:30 AM
When u no longer care about powder burns in your revolvers cylinder.

jmace57
April 26, 2013, 12:08 PM
When you can identify the differences between a barrel shroud and the shoulder thing that goes up, you are no longer a newb.
Usaf_Vet You Are My hero

22-rimfire
April 26, 2013, 12:25 PM
When you stop believing everything you read in the forums as fact and accept it for what it is, opinion. You can be well versed in one area, but pitifully ignorant or dumb in another.

dprice3844444
April 26, 2013, 12:28 PM
when the snap of a rubber glove makes you run

ThePenguinKnight
April 26, 2013, 01:02 PM
I tend to hold the view that there are three general types of beginner-level people in any given area.

1. Noobs/newbs. These folks do not take what they're doing seriously, make lots of mistakes while claiming it either didn't happen or was somehow not their fault, refuse to listen to instruction, tend to be very loudmouthed about what they think they know, and often present safety risks to those around them. They are arrogant, and are especially dangerous when they try to teach other people about what they think they know, especially because their arrogance is often mistaken as being confidence by those who know even less. Noob is a derogatory term, because nobody likes to be around that kind of person.

2. Newbie. The difference between this group and the last is all in the attitude. These folks tend to be more willing to learn, more willing to admit their mistakes, much softer spoken about topics they don't yet have business talking about, and are generally pleasant to be around and offer instruction to. Newbies are ALWAYS welcome, unless the mission of the group specifically requires experience the newbie doesn't yet have (competition shooting teams, etc.).

3. Amateurs/novices. These folks are just newbies who have a little experience under their belts, but take the field more seriously. They show serious interest, and are very conscientious of safety and learning. They aren't arrogant, but they are confident in what they've learned, while still being open and eager to learn more/better.

I consider myself pretty much a permanent amateur when it comes to firearms and shooting; at least, that's what I strive for. I like learning.

Don't be a noob :neener:

Potatohead
April 26, 2013, 01:33 PM
If you have to ask ... your a newb And their you have it.

thats pretty good

Potatohead
April 26, 2013, 01:36 PM
Originally Posted by colonel kernel View Post
i do think i can not accidentally shoot myself now..is that enough?"

"Nope - when you realize that anytime you have a firearm you can accidentally shoot youself, then you are not a newb..

very true

Potatohead
April 26, 2013, 01:40 PM
Now, to my thinking, you start to stop being a THR noob about the time you stop having to go look up acronyms and initialisms
still doing this in a major way

Potatohead
April 26, 2013, 01:43 PM
As far as the majority of this crowd goes I'll always be a newb. The wealth of firearm knowledge here is staggerin

great point JF

TheSaint
April 26, 2013, 04:29 PM
When you join the NRA, GOA and other pro-freedom groups. You join the ranks of responsible gun owners that realize that we are locked in a fight to the death that would no longer have us own anything we currently do if they had their way. You must be pro-active in fighting for our collective and individual rights if you really want to be no longer considered a noob. It took me a short while to realize this, but the money I spend towards the NRA-ILA or other good efforts is money well spent. Consider it "maintenance" for your firearms. :)

SabbathWolf
April 26, 2013, 05:17 PM
You are no longer a newb when you realize the "pretty RED ones" are not always 12ga shells, and that you cannot get 17 shots out of a 6-gun without reloading, no matter what John Wayne did in that movie you watched.

THe Dove
April 26, 2013, 05:25 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by colonel kernel
what the heck is that LOL (but really)

Ask Representative McCarthy
http://youtu.be/ospNRk2uM3U

That is one of the funniest vids I've seen. Thanks for sharing!

The Dove

SabbathWolf
April 26, 2013, 05:55 PM
LOL....

We are going to ban it!
What is it?
I don't know.......ha ha ha

Frank Ettin
April 26, 2013, 09:07 PM
Some things you really don't decide for yourself. One is not really an expert until others call him an expert. One is not a curmudgeon until others call him a curmudgeon. One stops being a "newbe" when others with experience start respecting his judgment and treat him as a "peer."

Like many things, that's an imperfect formula. But I tend to care less for one's self declarations than for the assessments of him by others who I respect.

CZguy
April 27, 2013, 03:55 AM
One is not a curmudgeon until others call him a curmudgeon.

Can I be a Curmudgeon in training?

Blackstone
April 27, 2013, 04:46 AM
I tend to hold the view that there are three general types of beginner-level people in any given area.

...

Don't be a noob :neener:
Are you a gamer by any chance? :D

TheSaint
April 27, 2013, 04:59 AM
Are you saying he's a n00b? :D

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