Is the ruger scout worth it?


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Skillet
April 26, 2013, 09:41 PM
before I start I would like to make a small intro to myself. I recently joined the US Air Force, and have been a gun nut for a while, but being young, (19yrs old) most of the guns i shot before were my father's. I recently purchased my first lever action (wanting a model 94 since i was a fetus) and I am on the lookout for a good hunting rifle, (i don't have one of those for my own yet) specifically one that can take down an elk, maybe at long distances (I live in NM). I was in the gun shop the other day, and I noticed a Ruger Scout LH .308. It looked like an awesome rifle, with a pad on the stock that was like 55 inches long and it handled very well because of how small and light it is. But, It was 1000 bucks! I just want to know if it is worth it. It had a very short barrel and I didn't know if that would sacrifice accuracy. Maybe I should just stick to my original plan (savage 110LH in 30-06), but any input on THR would be appreciated, it would be nice to learn from all you old timers :neener:

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musicman10_1
April 26, 2013, 09:51 PM
I paid around $800 for mine after tax and I felt that it was a good buy at that price. That was last summer and so the market has changed where price is concerned. I love mine and feel that it will suffice for most of my rifle needs for hunting and range use.

ECVMatt
April 26, 2013, 10:28 PM
I have had for a while now and really like it. It is very accurate, has a decent trigger, and packs easy. I like to take mine on family camping trips and when I am off in the desert by myself. It is fast up close and hammers well at distance. It is an overall winner in my book.

Geno
April 26, 2013, 10:35 PM
There are dozens of real quality reviews of this rifle on YouTube. The reviews are very impartial. Well, the ones I have seen. I don't own one, and so I can say from experience, but the video of reviews in action, were very informative. Check out the reviews by "hickok45" and by "Nutfancy".

Geno

Jackal
April 26, 2013, 10:44 PM
I'd have a very hard time spending $1000 for a M77 with a box mag.....

baz
April 26, 2013, 10:53 PM
Here we go again. :)

Been a couple of lengthy threads on this in recent memory. (Here's one (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=707732&highlight=ruger+scout).) Folks either seem to love it, or don't get it. I'm in the first category. In fact, I had my GSR out to the range just this morning.

As for your questions, the short barrel doesn't seem to be a significant negative as far as accuracy is concerned. (Here's a classic read on the subject (http://www.tacticaloperations.com/SWATbarrel/).) The gun shoots better than I can. As for the price, I don't know if you could get one right now for less than list, but I got mine less than four months ago for $900 (that includes about $70 in tax), NIB, from a dealer, at a gun show. I jumped on it.

mdauben
April 26, 2013, 10:55 PM
I am on the lookout for a good hunting rifle, (i don't have one of those for my own yet) specifically one that can take down an elk, maybe at long distances (I live in NM). I was in the gun shop the other day, and I noticed a Ruger Scout
The Ruger Scout is by its design a compromise gun. Try googling "scout rifle" to find out more about the idea behind the design

As such, it's not an optimum choice as a hunting rifle. Not to say it can't do it and do it well, but for hunting there are better choices available for less money like Savage. On the other hand if you have the cash to spend for $800-1000 you can get a very good hunting rifle like the Winchester 70.


Sent from my KFJWI using Tapatalk HD

jmr40
April 26, 2013, 11:00 PM
Not to me. The 16" barrel is going to hurt perfromance more than I'm willing to give up. While you think it is light, it is actually pretty heavy. The short barrel and balance point make it seem lighter than it is. 10 round magazines are not needed on a hunting rifle and they are expensive.

$1000 is too much for that gun. All I've seen have been $750-$800.

A standard All Weather Hawkeye is several hundred dollars cheaper and a better hunting rifle. As would be many others.

http://ruger.com/products/m77HawkeyeAllWeather/models.html


If you have $1000 to spend I'd buy this. Street prices will be $900-$950

http://www.winchesterguns.com/products/catalog/detail.asp?family=001C&mid=535110

If you really want to experience lightweight and have just about $1,100 buy this.

http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/model-84m/montana

The Kimber is almost 2 1/2 lbs lighter than the Ruger, both will be far more accurate.

tomrkba
April 26, 2013, 11:02 PM
Not with those sights, especially that rear sight. I'd really like to see Garand or M1A sights on the gun. I'll probably get one anyways, but I really want to improve the sights.

TimboKhan
April 27, 2013, 01:44 AM
The rear iron isn't great, but it is robust and I was getting three inch groups at 100 yards, which is good enough for me. I love mine, and it is my main and practically speaking only hunting rifle. I have other rifles I have and could hunt with, but I genuinely can't imagine choosing one of those rifles over my scout to take afield. Not thats its a highly technical performance review, but of 5 shots in the field, I have taken four animals with it, and the miss was my fault. Obviously, thats highly indicative of my confidence in the rifle as opposed to a truly good review of how this rifle performs in general or in comparison to other similar rifles, but there you have it.

I do agree that a grand is too much. I paid 800 after tax for mine, though to be fair there was a sale going on at the time.

sent from my Galaxy Note II.

Cooldill
April 27, 2013, 08:20 AM
+1 for Nutnfancy's youtube review. That should be all the info you need LOL.

Personally I would rather have a Ruger American rifle instead. I think the Gunsite Scout would have features that wouldn't be useful for what you need a rifle for, and that is why it costs so much.

Roadkill
April 27, 2013, 08:51 AM
Here you go - Spend another $300 for a scope and mounts and start reloading for it. Lee Enfield #5 Mark I


http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg20/Chromepulse/Picture006.jpg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVO1Gp6BtJE


As with everything, get what you want but there are always alternatives.

Geno
April 27, 2013, 09:33 AM
Roadkill:

I came to the very same conclusion. That's a nice little rifle.

Geno

qwert65
April 27, 2013, 11:07 AM
When I wanted a light 308 and being a lever fan I got a BLR which is the perfect rifle for me

rodinal220
April 27, 2013, 11:09 AM
Its worth it if you like the Scout Rifle Concept. I like my GSR and it comes close to Col. Coopers concept,many have debated this to ad nauseum that its a little heavier or doesn't have a bipod,but I believe the Scout rifle is a concept in flux.
Gunsite and Ruger worked together on the project and yes,certain compromises were made,it was based of Rugers M77 action and their methods of manufacturing.They could not get the M77 action to work with M14 mags so a proprietary one was made.

Mags are not just limited to 10 rounds,3 and 5 rounders are available for hunting or a more clean appearance.

I personally do not get people buying the GSR and running the optic over the receiver,why not get a regular rifle??I like the fact I have two mounting options should one fail,the Ruger system was already in place on the M77.

The GSR is not a sniper rifle,it is not a bench rest rifle,it is a Scout Rifle,for making hits out to medium range quickly and decisively with a full power cartridge.

Yes,you either like the GSR or do not. I love mine.

baz
April 27, 2013, 11:47 AM
+1 for Nutnfancy's youtube review. That should be all the info you need LOL.Yeah, well, "nutnfancy" doesn't seem to know what a scout rifle is all about, or even how to use a bolt action. Anyone who bases their opinion of the GSR solely upon this video is getting a biased opinion of the gun. Lots of people like the gun, for one reason or another. And others do not. To each his own.

back40
April 27, 2013, 12:29 PM
nutnfancy's review leaves a lot to be desired.

i really like my gsr. it's one of my current favorites, simply because it does so many things quite well. i've added an a2 flash suppressor, the xs full rail, and a good sling. i also have a 1-4x illum. reticle scope on quick release rings available, but generally shoot with irons. the accuracy is great (about moa), the trigger is really nice for a factory unit, and i like the stock. some claim it's too heavy, but the weight doesn't really bother me being that it's so compact and balances well.

the 1k price tag for the one you found is too steep. i paid $720 for mine, and just saw one in a shop the other day for $750. there's one on gunbroker for $850 right now.

Jackal
April 27, 2013, 12:36 PM
I am torn here. I love the M77 rifle series (really like the old tang safeties) but the GSR just does not cut the mustard for $1000. For that kind of money your getting into M1A territory (new M1A basic or used Scout). The M1A can do everything the GSR can, but better (higher capacity, likely more accurate, better sights, etc) . The GSR would be a great $600-$700 rifle.... Heck, even a Garand can be a viable alternative to the GSR. You lose 2 rounds, but gain semi auto fire, better sights, cheap clips, walnut stock and a battle/hunting proven rifle. Enblocs are easy to get and about $1 each while GSR mags are $60 each.... I'll take 60 8rd Enbloc clips over one GSR mag anyday.

back40
April 27, 2013, 12:46 PM
for my purposes, both the m1a and the garand take a back seat due to being semi auto. this is where one really needs to determine what they want from the rifle. some see semi as a plus, where as i see it as a minus.

Seventhsword
April 27, 2013, 12:48 PM
I am torn here. I love the M77 rifle series (really like the old tang safeties) but the GSR just does not cut the mustard for $1000. For that kind of money your getting into M1A territory (new M1A basic or used Scout). The M1A can do everything the GSR can, but better (higher capacity, likely more accurate, better sights, etc) . The GSR would be a great $600-$700 rifle.... Heck, even a Garand can be a viable alternative to the GSR. You lose 2 rounds, but gain semi auto fire, better sights, cheap clips, walnut stock and a battle/hunting proven rifle. Enblocs are easy to get and about $1 each while GSR mags are $60 each.... I'll take 60 8rd Enbloc clips over one GSR mag anyday.

I paid $29 for my 10rd Polymer GSR mags and $759 for the rifle. Why keep quoting the most expensive prices you can find on it? If you don't like it don't buy it....

Jackal
April 27, 2013, 01:05 PM
Why keep quoting the most expensive prices you can find on it?

The original post was priced at $1000. Mags are between $40 and $75 depending on steel vs plastic.;)

ECVMatt
April 27, 2013, 05:26 PM
I generally like nutnfancy, but that review was horrible. It was almost like he was trying to screw up with the rifle. I would not base my impression of the rifle off that. Here is an old review of mine. I will do an update this spring on a trip up near Death Valley.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


From another site I post on:

This is a follow up to my original thread posted here:

http://rugerforum.net/ruger-bolt-action/31410-first-impressions-my-ruger-gsr-i-finally-got-shoot.html

I now have about 350 rounds through the rifle with no problems related to the rifle. I have found it is very accurate and recoil appears to be on the mild side.

I have added a scope and finally got to shoot it for some groups. The scope has proved to be a challenge because I am used to a high magnification/fine cross hair varmint type scope. The scope is a standard Leupold Scout scope with heavy duplex. I am really warming up to this type of scope however. It is very fast and provided and good sight picture.

So I headed up to my range north of LA. I belong to a hunting club and we have a couple of trap ranges and a rifle range on our property so this provides a quiet and relaxed place to shoot.

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/bench.jpg

I got the rifle on paper at 50 yards and then moved back to 100. It was challenging for me to shoot at this distance because of the low magnification and the heavy duplex reticle. Here is a picture of a typical 100 yard group:

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/100c.jpg

I then came up with an idea to shoot a little bit tighter groups. I would first split the pie or cut the circle into four even pieces in the scope. Then I would cover the red dot in the center with the cross hairs and press the trigger. This is my best group using that method:

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/100b.jpg

I realize that this is not how the rifle was intended to be shot, but I need to confirm my zero and make sure my load was grouping correctly.

Next I went to 25 yards (top) and shot as quickly as possible from a low ready position and then moved back to the 50 yard line (bottom) and did it again. Here are the groups:

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/CloseRange.jpg

The one thing I learned from this is that beyond 25 yards, I need some type of rest or position change to hit. At 50 I knelled down and used a pipe for support. Although it slowed me down a bit, I was able to hit the target with much better accuracy. I have a lot of practicing to do.

Finally I loaded up the rifle and went for a walk to check the back fence to see if anyone has been coming on to our property. It took about an hour and I enjoyed hefting the rifle. It carries well for me and is easy to carry through the light bush we have up there. Here are some random shots I took of the rifle on this walk:

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/GSR3-1.jpg

http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n431/ECVMatt/GSR1-1.jpg

Final thoughts:

C-Products mags continue to suck. Do not buy them or any from the new company. They have bugs.

Muzzle blast is a non issue. It is not louder than the other two rifles I was shooting yesterday.

Accuracy is very good. With a conventional scope it would be possible to shoot some great groups. Don't believe the "Ruger's Can't Shoot" myth.

Overall this is a great little rifle and works exactly how I hoped it would. It is prefect for protecting my rural property and it very fun to shoot.

Hope this was informative.

Matt

baz
April 27, 2013, 07:48 PM
The gun shoots as well as I can (and could probably do better). The following "groups" were shot yesterday as I was sighting in at 100 yards:

http://oi41.tinypic.com/19kv82.jpg

The first group of five was pulling to the right, so I adjusted the windage on my scope (Leatherwood Hi-Lux ATR 2-7x, needed for my aging eyes) and then fired six more shots, five of which are in the "10-ring" (3 1/2"). I was shooting off a bench using a Harris bipod, but no rear bag or rest. I did change mags and ammo* during the eleven rounds shot. Since the goal was to tweak the sight picture of the scope, and not to shoot impressive groups (which I make no claim to be able to do), I was happy with the outcome. I'm shooting minute of deer and hog, and that's what matters.

-----------------------------
*The first mag had some Winchester NATO White Box 147 gr left in it, and the second mag was Wolf (which may account for the wider pattern). Next time out, I'll see how the sight picture holds using some .308 168 gr ammo.

ngnrd
April 27, 2013, 07:51 PM
... I am on the lookout for a good hunting rifle, (i don't have one of those for my own yet) specifically one that can take down an elk, maybe at long distances...

Regardless of whether people love or hate the concept of the scout rifle, that debate doesn't really address the OP's situation.

Regarding the original post... I would suggest that a 308 fired through an 16.5" or 18" barrel, while sighting your target with the typical low power scout scope, isn't exactly the optimal choice for a long distance elk rifle. Will it work? Maybe. But there are certainly much better choices out there for this use, especially in the $1000 range.

I would consider something like a Tikka T3, and a classic long action hunting cartridge, like a 30-06, in a 22" or 24" barrel. (I scooped up my T3-Lite in 270win when it went on clearance this past winter for $350 at my LGS, and I also took advantage of a rebate from Burris to mount a 3-9x40 Fullfield E1 scope on it for $150.) But, whatever brand you choose, there are plenty of rifles available that would be better than a Ruger GSR for long range elk hunting.

Geno
April 27, 2013, 08:19 PM
qwert65 said:

When I wanted a light 308 and being a lever fan I got a BLR which is the perfect rifle for me

Wow, I could not have said it better. The only reason I didn't purchase this dandy little Ruger was, it wasn't the right rifle for me. It is a very cool rifle, for some, just not me. Then, a lot of folks would say that they couldn't imagine carrying my M1A SOCOM...just too heavy. I like heavy. I like very heavy. :D So much of firearms purchasing is subjective. I think that is what most of us firearms aficionados would do well to keep in mind...what is the perfect rifle for me?

Well said, Sir.

Geno

henschman
April 28, 2013, 05:21 AM
I don't think it is worth it, being that there are still FR-8s out there for about a third of the price. I built my own Scout using one of those for around $400, and I like it better than a Ruger.

Manny
April 28, 2013, 08:59 AM
before I start I would like to make a small intro to myself. I recently joined the US Air Force, and have been a gun nut for a while, but being young, (19yrs old) most of the guns i shot before were my father's. I recently purchased my first lever action (wanting a model 94 since i was a fetus) and I am on the lookout for a good hunting rifle, (i don't have one of those for my own yet) specifically one that can take down an elk, maybe at long distances (I live in NM). I was in the gun shop the other day, and I noticed a Ruger Scout LH .308. It looked like an awesome rifle, with a pad on the stock that was like 55 inches long and it handled very well because of how small and light it is. But, It was 1000 bucks! I just want to know if it is worth it. It had a very short barrel and I didn't know if that would sacrifice accuracy. Maybe I should just stick to my original plan (savage 110LH in 30-06), but any input on THR would be appreciated, it would be nice to learn from all you old timers :neener:
The short barrel won't affect accuracy, but will cost a small bit in power due to velocity loss over a longer barrel, not enough that it should ever matter to any animal hunted with it though.

If you have need of the special features of the GSR the price is fair, and the rifle a dandy. For a hunting rifle though I'd look at the new Ruger Guide Gun. It has a similar stock, standard floor plate instead of the box mag, a 20" barrel, great iron sights and looks like a great hunting rig to me. Unforfunately I think the only LH version is chambered in .375 Ruger. Certainly a great hunting round, but maybe a bit much for your needs.

Here's a link to a review by Gunblast:

http://www.gunblast.com/Ruger-375GG.htm

chicharrones
April 28, 2013, 01:36 PM
I'd have a very hard time spending $1000 for a M77 with a box mag.....

and open sights, forward scope rail, user adjustable length of pull.

BruceB
April 28, 2013, 08:51 PM
For Fathers' Day 2011, my wife gave me MY CHOICE of the Ruger 1911 pistol, or the recently-announced left-handed Gunsite Rifle.

I opted for the GSR, which I didn't actually get until Christmas of that year.

NO REGRETS! My rifle arrived with a very smooth action, and a trigger sufficiently light and crisp that I've never even thought of removing the stock to work on it (almost unheard-of, for me).

Medical events have prevented much shooting with it, but the limited experience I have indicates a very satisfactory level of accuracy.

I have a number of other "service-type" rifles, but nothing that comes close to filling the niche occupied by the GSR.

Is it worth it?

YES.

baz
April 28, 2013, 10:48 PM
I don't think it is worth it, being that there are still FR-8s out there for about a third of the price. I built my own Scout using one of those for around $400, and I like it better than a Ruger.Have you owned a Ruger? If so, fair enough. Otherwise, the FR-8 is a fine platform to create a scout rifle with, and there is always some pride and satisfaction from creating something of your own. But there are some legitimate differences between the two that might lead some to think the Ruger is worth the extra $$$. Such as magazine capacity (not to mention detachable mags). Or greater flexibility in the ammo choices (since many caution against using commercial .308 in the FR-8). I really don't think the two are very comparable, and it certainly isn't the case that the FR-8 is "better." I have the GSR, and I also have an M44 in a scout configuration (at closer to $300 invested, than the $400 you spent on your FR-8). And while I like it a lot, it would never really occur to me to compare it to, or say that I like it "better" than the GSR. Now if you've owned a GSR, and there was some things that turned you off about the experience, then share them so that the OP can better determine if the GSR is for him. Frankly, I think there have only been two substantive responses to his questions. One has been to allay his concerns about accuracy, and the other has been to question whether this is the best gun for elk at long ranges. And the latter may be a relevant concern. But if the GSR is not up to that task, I somehow doubt that the FR-8 is somehow better suited to it.

GriNgOboNeZ
April 29, 2013, 12:40 AM
This rifle seems to bring alot of passion out of people. Love it or hate it, it's a handy bolt action thats accurate as well in typical hunting ranges scoped or with the iron sights. I paid $800 for mine and couldn't be happier. As for those who can't justify when there are other rifles available, some of us don't want a project or something used that might possibly be screwed up somehow. I wanted new and Rugers customer service sold me.

bolthead
April 29, 2013, 12:20 PM
Regardless of whether people love or hate the concept of the scout rifle, that debate doesn't really address the OP's situation.

Regarding the original post... I would suggest that a 308 fired through an 16.5" or 18" barrel, while sighting your target with the typical low power scout scope, isn't exactly the optimal choice for a long distance elk rifle. Will it work? Maybe. But there are certainly much better choices out there for this use, especially in the $1000 range.

I would consider something like a Tikka T3, and a classic long action hunting cartridge, like a 30-06, in a 22" or 24" barrel. (I scooped up my T3-Lite in 270win when it went on clearance this past winter for $350 at my LGS, and I also took advantage of a rebate from Burris to mount a 3-9x40 Fullfield E1 scope on it for $150.) But, whatever brand you choose, there are plenty of rifles available that would be better than a Ruger GSR for long range elk hunting.

I agree with ngnrd here. I have handled the rifle and I like it but this would definitely not be my optimal choice for an elk rifle. You have a .308 which is considered by many to be in the lowest acceptable tier for an elk cartridge. Add a short barrel which will rob the cartridge of the marginal kinetic energy it has. My understanding is that elk are often/always hunted at distances greater than 100 yards. A long eye relief scope and the limited selection of them would definitely hinder me on a hunting trip like that. Cooper designed this rifle to be a compromise for survival hunting and self-defense. I think a more specialized rig would do way more good in this situation.

baz
April 29, 2013, 07:07 PM
Cooper designed this rifle to be a compromise for survival hunting and self-defense. I think a more specialized rig would do way more good in this situation.Exactly right. That said, if one could only have one rifle, the GSR might be the more versatile choice. While it might not be ideal for elk, it could be pressed into service for that. I responsible hunter would probably want pass up the longer range shots, and do some stalking to get closer. But inside 300 yards, I wouldn't hesitate to take a shot with my GSR. Now I do have a 2-7x scope on it, and not just the more common 2.75x many have, and that would make a big difference to whether I would take the shot.

All we can do is just acknowledge the pros and cons, and then make the choice that works best for each of us.

As for:You have a .308 which is considered by many to be in the lowest acceptable tier for an elk cartridge.

Not all would agree:I think it might be wise to divide elk cartridges into three categories as follows:

1. Cartridges primarily intended for shooting deer and black bear (CXP2 class game) at woods ranges that are also adequate for elk at short range (100 yards or less). These cartridges are at the low end of the power scale as elk cartridges, due to their limited down range energy. Their advantage is that most hunters can shoot them more accurately than the more powerful elk cartridges. Included in this group are the .30-30 Winchester, .32 Winchester Special, .35 Remington, .375 Winchester and similar cartridges.

2. Combination CXP2/CXP3 cartridges that are more powerful than strictly necessary for deer size game. These are more powerful than the cartridges in the first category. Most are excellent all-around cartridges and adequate for shooting elk at medium to long range (200 yards or more). Many hunters find the muzzle blast and recoil of these cartridges intimidating, particularly when shooting the heavier weight bullets, but few will admit it. This category includes such stalwarts as the .264 Winchester Magnum, .270 Winchester, the .270 Magnums, 7x64 Brenneke, .280 Remington, 7mm WSM, 7mm Rem. Magnum, 7mm Weatherby, .308 Marlin Express, .300 Savage, .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield, .303 British and 8x57JS.

3. Ideal elk cartridges. These are good cartridges to consider if you are buying a rifle specifically for elk hunting and don't mind substantial recoil and muzzle blast. Their principle drawback is that most shooters do mind the recoil and muzzle blast, particularly of the magnums, and simply cannot do their best shooting with these cartridges. For long range elk shooting (300 yards) the list is basically limited to cartridges such as the long 7mm Magnums (7mm STW, 7mm RUM), .300 Magnums, 8mm Magnums and .338 Magnums. At short to medium range, the list expands to include medium and big bore cartridges such as the .338 Marlin Express, .338 Federal, .338-06 A-Square, .348 Winchester, .358 Winchester, .35 Whelen, .350 Remington Magnum, 9.3x62mm, 9.3x74R, .444 Marlin, .450 Marlin and .45-70.

If you really want a thorough weighting of the pros and cons of various cartridges for hunting elk, "read the whole thing (http://www.chuckhawks.com/elk_cartridges.htm)."

usurp31
April 29, 2013, 11:17 PM
If you ever have the opportunity to try one, I recommend highly giving it a go; very nice shooting scout.

4anedge
September 2, 2013, 11:19 PM
My reloads do not work in the Scout Rifle and don't know why. I've switched primers and still have dead strikes about every third round.
Been reloading for 40-years, never had this problem before.
Makes me want to sell my Ruger Scout Rifle. If interested in purchasing this Rifle please contact me.
Thanks
-Mike

tomrkba
September 3, 2013, 12:03 AM
My reloads do not work in the Scout Rifle and don't know why. I've switched primers and still have dead strikes about every third round.
Been reloading for 40-years, never had this problem before.
Makes me want to sell my Ruger Scout Rifle. If interested in purchasing this Rifle please contact me.
Thanks
-Mike

Rather than complain, call Ruger and ask for their advice. There may be a problem with rifle.

X-Rap
September 3, 2013, 11:01 AM
I like Ruger 77's but haven't ever paid over $450 for one, the features of the Scout won't likely change that.

AKMtnRunner
September 4, 2013, 04:05 AM
I considered the GSR for a long time. It was hard to leave it alone as it feels so nice in the hands. Then, I also considered that it is practically the only left handed bolt rifle with back up iron sights commonly available. So hard to not throw down a thousand bucks for one. But . . . I concluded that an intermediate cartridge semi auto fit my "scout" needs better and I should have a dedicated hunting rifle with a more powerful chambering for my hunting needs.

I think we don't want to admit that we don't need a "scout" rifle as Cooper envisioned. When we have a rifle with us, we have a specific need for it to do; and in the small chance we need it for something else, it's not like a more specialized rifle couldn't cover it.

X-Rap
September 4, 2013, 11:28 AM
I think that is the irony of the Scout Rifle. Reality says many of us don't need just one all purpose rifle and the few who, due to economics may have to get by with just one could buy 2 or 3 for the same amount as a single Scout. The closer one gets to the original intent the more individual guns one could buy.

DammitBoy
September 4, 2013, 11:30 AM
I've had zero issues with mine, I really enjoy shooting it, the accuracy is excellent and it's perfect for hunting in my region.

Who is paying $1000 for a a ruger scout? I paid $900 out the door, taxes and all.

Geno
September 4, 2013, 11:36 AM
Oh how times change. A little bit ago, I caved-in a bought a Ruger Gunsite Scout. :o Somehow it grew on me. Specifically, it was the peep sights, and the overall balance. I haven't put a scope on it, and probably won't. Given my change in attitude and affinity toward this rifle since post #25, I may just end up adding a scope in the future. Never say never, I guess. :)

Geno

mdauben
September 4, 2013, 12:01 PM
I tend to see-saw between (1) thinking its a flawed implementation of a questionable design concept and (2) wanting one really bad. :rolleyes:

captain awesome
September 4, 2013, 12:40 PM
I also think you can do a lot better for your purposes. 308 can take out an elk, 30/06 is a better choice, 300 winchester is a better choice than that. A longer barrel would suit you better. I doubt accuracy would be much of an issue but terminal performance might be. Elk are pretty large animals particular bull elk if that's what you're after. If I were hunting elk and expected potentially long range shots, I would take my 338win. ruger 77. If I expected a lot of walking and wanted lighter weight but serious knockdown power, it would be my tc encore 300win. Again, that Ruger scout is a very cool rifle imo, and COULD do what you are asking, but its not the best choice or the best price for whaT you want it to do.

rodregier
September 4, 2013, 12:45 PM
Years ago I had issues with my Ruger 77 MKII in .308 Win with NATO-spec ball ammunition (hard primers) and primer ignition.

Replaced the striker (firing pin) spring with a heavier Wolff unit and solved it.
Wolff claims the factory spring is 21 lbs, they sell 24 and 28 lb springs for the same application. My recollection is that I went with the 24 lb spring.


I believe the Ruger Scout is based on the same action design.

http://www.gunsprings.com/Rifles%20%26%20Shotguns/RUGER/77,%20MKI%20%26%20MKII/cID2/mID52/dID226

chicharrones
September 4, 2013, 12:49 PM
Oh how times change. A little bit ago, I caved-in a bought a Ruger Gunsite Scout. :o Somehow it grew on me. Specifically, it was the peep sights, and the overall balance. I haven't put a scope on it, and probably won't. Given my change in attitude and affinity toward this rifle since post #25, I may just end up adding a scope in the future. Never say never, I guess. :)

Geno

It's a sweet little adaptable rifle for sure. :cool:

If people have a hankering for a GSR and the money, they may like it. And they shouldn't worry about the "Scout" or "Gunsite" moniker on it. It is a rifle that can be many things to many people. That's why I just call it a GSR.

The way mine is currently set up, it's not exactly a scout. Maybe if it were called a Handy rifle . . . nah, that wouldn't work. H&R already has that name, plus it wouldn't sound cool enough for the Ruger marketing department.

Even though it outweighs the rimfire rifle below, it feels no heavier when shouldered for firing due to less metal that far out from the shooter. So yeah, it can be short and it feels downright handy.

http://www.lssdigital.com/lwpilot/gsr-39.jpg

chicharrones
September 4, 2013, 12:52 PM
Years ago I had issues with my Ruger 77 MKII in .308 Win with NATO-spec ball ammunition (hard primers) and primer ignition.

Replaced the striker (firing pin) spring with a heavier Wolff unit and solved it.
Wolff claims the factory spring is 21 lbs, they sell 24 and 28 lb springs for the same application. My recollection is that I went with the 24 lb spring.


Maybe Ruger did something to fix that problem. I have had no light strikes in my GSR with 7.62 NATO ammo so far.

Hummer70
September 4, 2013, 01:13 PM
rodregier is exactly right, Wolff Spring extra strength is the way to go for lots of rifles.

Insofar as the true purest Scout Rifle is concerned they are a bit light for me but Ruger has done some things that really make it neat:

They made it with shoot all the way through lunch magazine.

In the second generation they put spacers in the stocks so you can fit those of us with no necks all the way to the gorrillas.

They made it with laminated stock.

Installed a flash suppressor.

Improved the iron sights that are much more utilitarian over the ones Bill approved years ago.

The safety system on the MKII is probably the best in the industry.

There is a couple more things I would do to improve it even further. I would thread the end of the bolt knob and install a round phenolic ball about 1" in diameter to make it easier to work in rapid fire. You could also change it to the tapered knobs at your pleasure for about $2.00.

I would change the location of the lower sling stud to the side of the stock about 3" in front of the buttplate to allow the carry of the rifle muzzle down and close to the back so it won't hang on low branches etc. Take a look at Swiss rifles.

Redesign the rear action ring to allow for 1903 Springfield stripper clipes to be used for rapid reloading of the mags.

I have about five rifles set up as wannabee Scouts right now and they all have longer barrels and heavier barrels. I generally recycle target barrels to other rifles and set them back and rechamber them and I can have a very good trigger pull and a easily replaced scope system.

Here is how:

Take a target barrel, cut threads off and set back to new rifling and re-thread. About ten inches in front of action quickly reduce diameter of barrel down to .800" and run that to with 1 1/4" of muzzle. The last 1 1/4" turn it to .752".

Get a Weaver 92A base and drill and tap the barrel starting at the .800" diameter and mount a pistol or a scout scope on it. Base and rings can be had for about $25.00 and doesn't take anything fancy to mount the scope like $55.00 bases etc.

Put 11deg crown on muzzle.



Get black 3/4" chair leg protectors at Lowes (4 pack) and use as muzzle caps.

Go out and shoot up about 5000 rounds and set barrel back again.

If you want to get very exotic take a M16 birdcage flash suppressor and drill it out to just smaller than the theads and turn barrel down and thread 1/2X28 and screw on flash suppressor. The you can buy M16 muzzle caps for the bird cage on ebay for a few cents each and be set.

I suspect you will find you have a 22" barrel that shoots very well indeed.

Welding Rod
September 4, 2013, 01:28 PM
It's a Ruger. I wouldnt buy one without a thorough examination.

I was looking a GSR in a local store the other day and the flash arrester was mounted crooked as hell on barrel. Didnt surprse m a bit. While Rugers are sometimes a good value, from all their obvious mistakes I have encountered over the years I believe their QC is the most slipshod among the major US manufacturers.

chicharrones
September 4, 2013, 01:29 PM
I would change the location of the lower sling stud to the side of the stock about 3" in front of the buttplate to allow the carry of the rifle muzzle down and close to the back so it won't hang on low branches etc. Take a look at Swiss rifles.

I like that idea. There is a GSR owner that did that very thing over in this thread (http://www.ar15.com/mobile/topic.html?b=6&f=52&t=351451). Look halfway down for CoyoteGray's posts.

selector67
September 5, 2013, 09:06 PM
That is a nice rifle you have there Roadkill, I was thinking on getting one of those, how is the accuracy and does it hold twelve rounds or ten? :)

moxie
September 5, 2013, 09:36 PM
This is from an old Air Force guy. Welcome!

For your first hunting rifle, get something in a common format, such as the Savage you mentioned. The Scout is a wonderful rifle, but is a "niche" item, best suited after you've got several years and hunts under your belt.

And, at 19, you might want to save a few hundred bucks and get the Savage. Bank the difference for ammo, scope and other hunting equipment.

TexasPatriot.308
September 5, 2013, 10:59 PM
I love Rugers, but there are more reasonably priced options that may even work better. don't believe everything you read in gun mags, cause they are paid by the gun makers to give them a good review..."don't bite the hand that feeds ya"....doubt any gun mags will trash this or any other firearm...like I said, more reasonable options out there. your money.

dprice3844444
September 6, 2013, 12:39 AM
savage makes a scout rifle that is way cheaper

Elkins45
September 6, 2013, 08:23 AM
If I'm going to carry a gun with a protruding box magazine it won't be a bolt action. It also won't have a shortened barrel.

For the same money I would sooner have a BLR, or spend a little more and get an M1A. But what I would actually do is spend the same amount of money and buy a good conventional bolt gun with a good Leupold scope and mounts, plus reloading dies and supplies. You can get a perfectly serviceable bolt gun for literally half the price of the GSR and I wouldn't miss any of the added bells and whistles. Well, in fairness the open sights are nice, but you can still find rifles with a good set of irons.

Willie Sutton
September 6, 2013, 09:27 AM
"If I'm going to carry a gun with a protruding box magazine it won't be a bolt action"


Thanks for "getting it".

Cooper and the majority of the other Scout Rifle Conference(s) attendees felt that a flush box magazine to allow easy one handed carry at point of balance was an essential part of the design of the Scout. The protruding magazine is absolutely in contradiction with the spirit of the Scout Rifle as envisioned by the originators of the concept. (As is the flash hider).



Willie


.

Hummer70
September 6, 2013, 05:06 PM
Chicarones,

Man I never saw so much wood hogged out that wasn't covered by a buttplate. He could have done it much easier by using a 1903A3 stamped lower sling swivel and a 1/2" end mill on a milling machine and made it much smaller. I don't use Springfield Screws as they are too pricey. I use Phillips head wood screws and I first run screws in, then remove them and pour thinned ( w/ acetone) Devcon 2 Ton Epoxy in hole, let it soak in a bit and re-insert the screw. Never had to worry about screw backing out.

I had a phone repair guy give me a extra long 3/8" drill once. Its about 18" long. It is for drilling at a base board and making sure it comes out under the house even if it has to go to through several beams.

I was thinking about doing that and inserting a screw together M16 cleaning rod. Only problem is the Ruger buttplate would be a bear to get off so you would have to carry a screwdriver around your neck.

Assuming you are going to shoot it alot one needs to think about what the next barrel is going to be because it is going to have to be contoured alot to get it back in stock.

I would not put side swivel on front end because if you want to use the sling for long range prone shooting it won't work well. What would be better is several studs like on some bolt guns I see. One would be for Harris 6-9 bipod and other for sling swivel.

henschman
September 6, 2013, 05:10 PM
I can see not wanting a protruding mag for carry and whatnot, but I see no downside to a flash hider. I think it is a great feature on a rifle that sees lots of carry in the field, because it protects the muzzle crown... along with it's main intended purpose of course (keeping the muzzle flash from blinding the shooter). Seeing how it adds maybe half an inch and minuscule weight, I left the FH on my FR8 scout.

Welding Rod
September 6, 2013, 05:13 PM
Personally I think a flash hider is a plus on just about any rifle.

Elkins45
September 6, 2013, 05:28 PM
Personally I think a flash hider is a plus on just about any rifle.
I think a threaded muzzle is a plus, especially if you own a can in that caliber.

Hummer70
September 6, 2013, 05:35 PM
Had they used a m16 Birdcage (open slots all the way around) the owners could us M16 muzzle caps to keep crap out of bore etc.

I bet the design time and the cost of production is like 12.00 on them where the AR Bird cages can be had for about five bucks. Just drill them out so the 30 cal bullets clear.

would have shortened the rifle about a inch as well.

They did this on some M60s and it worked fine.

krupparms
September 6, 2013, 06:11 PM
I have a GSR and think it is great for what I need it for. But I would NOT recommend it for what you want! You can buy a much cheaper rifle that will fit your needs. Several have already been suggested. Pick one of them like the Savage or a surplus gun like the 2A1 Enfield in .308nato . You can pick up a used Ruger GSR down the road if you still want one. But it's your money in the end! By the way I got mine for $800 . And I thought that was a little to much! But at $1000 I would wait!

tahunua001
September 6, 2013, 08:44 PM
well think about it. a remington 700 with laminate stock will run you more than $700,

scout scope mount/picitini will cost a couple hundred dollars
magazine upgrade will cost a couple hundred
cutting the barrel and getting flash hider will be another couple hundred....


... I would say that the ruger is worth it compared to building your own.

I just wish it came in 243.

DammitBoy
September 6, 2013, 09:18 PM
I have the 3, 5, and 10 round mags - so I can configure the profile as I see fit.

musicman10_1
September 6, 2013, 09:36 PM
Exactly. With a 3 round mag in the GSR takes on a very different feel.

chicharrones
September 6, 2013, 11:56 PM
Chicarones,
Man I never saw so much wood hogged out that wasn't covered by a buttplate.

Yeah, a lot of wood had to come out for that set up. I do like the final flush fit and the appearance ain't too shabby once done. I won't take that on since I don't have anything but a couple hand tools for wood. Mine would look a bit butchered, I'm sure.

chicharrones
September 7, 2013, 12:16 AM
One thing about that flash suppressor on the Ruger GSR, is that it seems Ruger puts it on everything they make that has a flash suppressor. The 10/22 tactical, SR556, Mini14/30, and the GSR. They just change the bore and threads to suit the barrel.

Even though the flash suppressor works from a bystanders point of view, I don't notice the flash without the flash suppressor from the shooters point of view in any light. I mean it is a one-bullet-at-a-time gun after all. Of course, I haven't fired it night.

For me, I'd rather lose 1.5" overall rifle length by removing that 2.25" long generic Ruger flash suppressor. (about 0.75" is the threads on the barrel)

back40
September 7, 2013, 12:23 AM
Of course, I haven't fired it night.

isn't this one of the primary times a flash suppressor becomes useful?

one can always swap out the ruger unit for any other. i put an armalite a2 style on mine. the ruger unit haveing slots all the way around, kicks up a bit of dust and dirt when fired from prone.

chicharrones
September 7, 2013, 01:46 AM
isn't this one of the primary times a flash suppressor becomes useful?


Yep, if I had a situation that I'd fire the GSR at night, it'd make sense for my use. Since I don't have optics on it for night use, well . . . :D

greyling22
September 7, 2013, 12:30 PM
308 and a short barrel is just so loud... now with a can or with the 18" version maybe. I wish they would just take that 18" threaded barrel and left handed action and drop it in a regular laminate stock. I'd buy one then. I'm just not into the whole detach mag and scount mount and iron sights on an long range caliber rifle (yes, I know 308 isn't truly long range, but it is not meant to be a short range round like a pistol round either). Don't get me wrong, I LOVE the scout setup on a short range gun like an m1 carbine, and marlin 1894, and if I can figure out a GOOD way to do it on my 10/22 without a lot of costly upgrades I'm there. But a 308 is a long range cartridge, and that wants a long range scope, and that does poorly as a scout setup.

stubbicatt
September 7, 2013, 01:15 PM
My son has one. I got to shoot it. Now I want one. I think it is a great rifle.

Meeteetse
September 7, 2013, 08:09 PM
I have two Scouts, one RH, one LH. One cost $990 and one cost $775. The lower priced one was purchased recently after the craziness wore off. I think it is a great rifle for lots of things; hunting, personal protection, fun shooting or whatever else you can think of. It is a good general purpose rifle and one of the few on the market that still has iron sights, which I like. It is a great truck gun if you want a little more power than a 30/30 lever gun.

I would not buy the GSR as my first or "only" hunting rifle because of the price. I would buy a Ruger American for half the price, but I like Ruger products. If you don't like the American, and have more money, I would buy a Ruger Compact in .308. Both of these require a scope. I am sure there are others out there for less money than the GSR.

Like it or not, the GSR is a fun rifle and I enjoy mine.

TwoWheelFiend
September 7, 2013, 08:18 PM
I have one. Bought it a cpl years ago. Its accurate, handy, relatively light, fast to get on sight, and has a decent trigger, and if I can see it I can hit it with my GSR.

The GSR like other scout rifles does not excel at one thing. It is an all around rifle for multiple purposes. If you want to shoot tiny groups buy a benchrest rifle. If you want to shoot a ram at 600 yds in the pump station perhaps its not the best rifle. But if you want an all around good rifle that you can hunt and defend yourself with, ill take my GSR.

Ignition Override
September 8, 2013, 02:41 AM
Roadkill: You might have realized this after you posted that photo in April: it is a Gibbs in 7.62 Nato/.308. A friend has one and he really likes it. The sight is a rear leaf, in contrast to the Enfield #5 "Jungle", which has the adjustable rear aperture. I have two original Enfield #5s.

Your idea is excellent, and how many of you guys know what the Spanish FR8 actually is? Three of the four sight settings are apertures. Many FR8s have the original matching bolts and really bright bores.
The weak(er) Spanish 7.62 ammo was produced for either the small-ring 7mm Mauser conversions and/or the select-fire CETME.
Unlike the weaker FR7 (converted from the small-ring 7x57 mm), the FR8 is built on the large-ring 8mm Mauser action, and is quite strong.

They are sort of like a heavier "Jungle Carbine", but use a round which is easier to find, with bullets much easier to find for reloading. My FR8s have several of the benefits and features of the CETME G-3, without the risks associated with so many Century semi-autos.

M1GarandDeerHunter
September 8, 2013, 05:41 AM
I think its a nifty rifle. I have a New Frontier that was a gift with a forward mounted 2 1/2 scope. Much to my surprise almost everyone in my family loves it. It is neat and efficient. Quite accurate. Not surprisingly it has taken a number of deer already. I looked at the GSR about 2 weeks ago, and really like it. I view these rifles more as general purpose utility rifles. Much as I utilize a Garand or an 1903 Springfield. I think this is a design concept that is either liked or not liked. Hummer70 had some very interesting ideas as to improvements and changes he would make or suggest. I like some of his ideas. If I remember right, Jeff Coopers thoughs on rifles at that time, was that much time had been spent on cartridges and marketeering and not enough time on the launching pads themselves as far as innovation goes. A rifle that gets shot alot, is usually one that is enjoyed for various reasons and gets the job at hand, done. The GSR, to me seems as though it would be both fun to shoot, and capable. Hope this helps.

jlucas45
January 6, 2014, 07:03 PM
I first saw the Ruger Scout and loved it, but I could not justify coming up with the $700+ for it, and then I saw a sporterized Enfield No.4Mk1, and was intrigued that it had virtually all of the features of the scout, though not as "fancy". The Enfield cost $289 and had a very tight bore that allows the use of .308 bullets, and often prints 1MOA with them. Additionally, the Enfield is very "field servicable", so I picked up some spare springs, firing pin, screws, extractor and springs, and threw them all in a kit box. I don't miss the Ruger, and am completely satisfied with the old 303.

chicharrones
January 6, 2014, 07:46 PM
I first saw the Ruger Scout and loved it, but I could not justify coming up with the $700+ for it, and then I saw a sporterized Enfield No.4Mk1, and was intrigued that it had virtually all of the features of the scout, though not as "fancy". The Enfield cost $289 and had a very tight bore that allows the use of .308 bullets, and often prints 1MOA with them. Additionally, the Enfield is very "field servicable", so I picked up some spare springs, firing pin, screws, extractor and springs, and threw them all in a kit box. I don't miss the Ruger, and am completely satisfied with the old 303.

That sounds like a good fit for you. I like Enfields myself, but have only fired them not owned them.

Be sure to post more otherwise we might think you're a lurker. ;) :D

jimherb
January 6, 2014, 09:08 PM
To me, it depends on what kind of hunting you want to do. Your 94 has taken more deer than any other rifle, and I would say for 100-200 yards it is more than adequate. If your tastes run to longer ranges and heavier rounds, I would really suggest a Ruger 77est Ruger American, Savage 110 or the new Thompson/Center Dimension (which you can easily switch out to other popular calibers. Scout rifles are cool, but I really don't know what I would use it for.

huntinfool87
January 7, 2014, 12:34 AM
I dont own one butvi have considered buying one but you said you where after a hunting rifle and a scout rifle is NO hunting rifle. You can get twice the hunting rifle for half the price but if your dead set on spending that kind of cash look into a wby rifle. If you want to save money the Ruger American rifle for the press and the Remington Model 783 is also a great rifle for the price.

Art Eatman
January 7, 2014, 12:14 PM
huntinfool87, with a short mag, the RSR is as good a hunting carbine as any other .308 shorty.

huntinfool87
January 7, 2014, 03:30 PM
Art the point I was trying to make is why spend that kind of money for a hunting rifle when you can go buy a model 77 that was made for hunting for half the price instead of buying a scout rifle that wasn't made for hunting for twice the price.

BruceB
January 7, 2014, 05:48 PM
I believe Art's point is that the GSR fills BOTH roles in one rifle.... it's a serviceable hunting rifle AND a Scout rifle in the same package.

GSRs are also serving some owners of my acquaintance as steel-silhouette rifles, as "mobile" (walkabout) varminters, and as who-knows-what-else-rifles.... just as the original concept envisioned. I see it as a rifle that can be taken from the rack on any given day, and have it perform ANY rifle duties I might need on that particular day.... even as I leave home with no specific goal in mind.

I have a couple dozen wildly-varied rifles here, and any of them will probably serve its intended purpose better than will the GSR..... but the GSR will perform at least decently in almost any role a man could wish. I'd hate to be without mine!

THAT is the proof of the concept and the package, as far as I'm concerned.

Art, my apologies if I've misunderstood your intent.

Corn-Picker
January 7, 2014, 08:08 PM
If price were all that mattered we would all be shooting a mosin-nagant or an SKS, and there would be no Blasers, Coopers, or other fancy rifles. There'd also be no need for single shot rifles, because repeaters and semi-autos are more capable.

One things for sure, you can use a scout scope while wearing ski goggles, which is something that would have been useful the past two days :D

john wall
January 8, 2014, 01:09 AM
Seems that most of the nay sayers do not have one, have not shot one, or are too cheap to buy one.

As an old fellow with health problems, I can say there are no pockets in a shroud. If you want the gun, buy it. If you want to carry it like a gun with an internal mag, get the three round mag for it.

I don't buy at retail, but many gun stores sell at that level. Find a pawn shop who will do cheap transfers and buy it online, save several hundred. Buy mags online, they are not $70+ unless you do not comparison shop.

Folks who have them like them, except for a fellow who cannot reload correct ammo, and one who did not read the manual that says to shoot domestic commercial ammo.

When I bought mine, I sold FIVE rifles that it totally outclassed, out shot, and out performed. I also use the iron sights, which I prefer.

I load mine with no issues, the gun has a typical 7.62 NATO chamber. Measure the headspace on your gun and load proper ammo set up for YOUR rifle.

If you want it to shoot crapola ammo, get the extra power striker spring.

My Stainless Scout with standard spring, 18" barrel, and 1.635" headspace shoots everything. It is a keeper.

Art Eatman
January 8, 2014, 11:49 AM
My only real negative about the GSR is the hang-down mag, since when hunting I like to occasionally carry my rifle at the balance point. (That's why I don't do walking hunting with my AR.) But, as I understand it, a shorter mag is available, so that gripe goes away.

I put a box of shells through a friend's GSR. Plenty accurate for deer or coyote hunting.

Price? For me, as a certified Olde Phart, the whole blinkin' world is a case of sticker shock. I thought I was paying an arm and a leg at $315 out the door for a Wby Mark V, back in 1971. Now? Yuck!

So, I guess the GSR is plenty good for casual paper punching, plinking and hunting. Short and handy enough to have as a truck gun.

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