how'd you force a patina?


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DNS
April 28, 2013, 09:43 PM
Using my new Opinel Carbon 12 tonight and its starting to pick up a little patina from onions, papaya and tomatoes. I got one hot spot from a standing drop of tomato juice it looks like. I might try some vinegar or mustard; which one though...

Suggestions on forcing some more?

Btw, it was cutting tomatoes darn near paper thin. :cool:

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Deltaboy
April 28, 2013, 09:46 PM
Mustard or Lemon juice.

JShirley
April 28, 2013, 10:58 PM
I would probably use mustard to make an interesting pattern.

hso
April 28, 2013, 11:28 PM
Blot with mustard and rinse after 5 hours and check the appearance.
Use 0000 steel wool on the blade to remove any weak patina and rinse thoroughly. Dry the blade and reapply mustard in blobs to any weak areas of patina. After 5 hrs. rinse and wool again.
Reapply more mustard and repeat the process a 3rd time and then a 4th. You'll reach a point of diminishing return on the effort (and you'll get bored by it) so going for a 5th or 6th or... will be a greater waste of time.

Sam Cade
April 28, 2013, 11:44 PM
Soaking a towel (paper or otherwise) in vinegar and then wrapping the blade is a good way to get a purty pattern.



This is a Hyde 510, wrapped overnight in a shop towel.

Done by my 7 year old. Scales too. :-)

P.B.Walsh
April 29, 2013, 12:09 AM
Is patina purely cosmetical or does it have a practical use?

Sam Cade
April 29, 2013, 12:19 AM
Is patina purely cosmetical or does it have a practical use?

If you give a good long soak and have a thick even patina (an oxide coating) it will act as a slightly protective layer against corrosion.

...the primary function is to keep oneself from looking like a noob.:D

P.B.Walsh
April 29, 2013, 02:17 AM
Cool, I'll have to try it out on the next one I make!

Fiv3r
April 29, 2013, 09:26 AM
Unless you've got a specific pattern in mind, just using a carbon blade will create an interesting and unique patina. I just used my brand new Fiddleback Hiking Buddy to cut up a dozen lemons for lemonade and quartered some spare ribs. Went from shiny and bright to a slight dull gray. Looks great:)

I have made several swirled patterns by wrapping a blade in a muriatic acid soaked towel, rinsed, buffed, and repeated several times before neutralizing the acid with sodium bicarb, finding, drying, and giving a final oil. Really deep, dark, etch.

HiWayMan
April 29, 2013, 09:30 AM
I like to microwave coke so it is about 120*-150*F. Suspend the blade in that for a while. Heating it seems to make it react better.

mdauben
April 29, 2013, 04:14 PM
I don't worry about "forcing" a patina on carbon steel blades. I just use them for slicing fruits and vegetables and they develop one all on their own. ;)

Piraticalbob
April 29, 2013, 07:16 PM
I don't worry about "forcing" a patina on carbon steel blades. I just use them for slicing fruits and vegetables and they develop one all on their own. ;)
+1. Forcing a patina is like buying pre-ripped jeans. Marks you as a poseur.

Sol
April 29, 2013, 08:01 PM
Liver of sulphur

Bartholomew Roberts
April 29, 2013, 08:47 PM
I left a carbon steel Mora sitting in a glass of grapefruit juice overnight. This gave it a nice even charcoal grey patina; but it wasn't very deep or very useful as a protective coating. It is now a mix of use patina (various spots from cutting things, rust) shinier spots from cutting fibrous things/having light surface rust cleaned off, and the original charcoal grey. I mainly use it as my gardening knife, some of the plants I cut with it etch the blade and apparently our soil is slightly acid since it will leave marks on the blade if not immediately cleaned off.

Sam Cade
April 29, 2013, 09:12 PM
A nice long vinegar soak can also useful to get a look at the heat treat and remove surface rust.

I plunked this wee axe into a bath last night to illustrate:

Deltaboy
April 29, 2013, 09:25 PM
Looks good Sam.

Sam Cade
April 29, 2013, 09:59 PM
Looks good Sam.

Would you believe I found that while cleaning out a sinkhole full of garbage?

The bit is haaaaaaard. It will skate a file like Johnny Weir.:D

http://dc.guestofaguest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/weir.jpg

mgmorden
April 29, 2013, 10:57 PM
+1. Forcing a patina is like buying pre-ripped jeans. Marks you as a poseur.

I'll agree. Some nice wear can look good on something, but to me its only good if the item has "earned" that wear.

Valkman
April 30, 2013, 03:44 AM
Forcing a patina is like buying pre-ripped jeans. Marks you as a poseur.


I agree in that I've always let it develop naturally - I like the look of doing it that way.

25cschaefer
April 30, 2013, 09:37 AM
For steel, hang in a box above a bowl of bleach, observe often.
For brass, hang in a box above a bowl of ammonia.

DO NOT PATINA BRASS AND STEEL AT THE SAME TIME!

Depending on the size of the project, a foot locker on end works well.

The problem with liquids and pastes is that they can look splotchy and it is easy to tell. Vapors patina evenly and look authentic.

conw
April 30, 2013, 10:13 AM
I disagree about forcing patinas being lame. I love wearing my Levis 501s to death and that's half the fun but when it comes to knives in my experience a patina that is forced can help prevent light rust.

I use my sodbuster Jr for food prep a lot and the occasional (inevitable) light rust gets cleaned off but without the deep, relatively even patina it seemed harder to clean off, as if the rust penetrated farther.

Zeke/PA
April 30, 2013, 04:15 PM
I like to "patina" carbon steel blades and French's yellow mustard is my choice.
I wipe the blade with Acetone to remove any oil/fingerprints, coat the blade with mustard and let set 15-20 minutes, Rince in VERY hot water,dry and repeat the process 3 or 4 times.

DNS
May 1, 2013, 03:08 PM
Muratic acid you say...

I use caustic soda at work.
Sounds like I found something new to do tonight.:cool:

bolthead
May 1, 2013, 04:38 PM
I use rust remover (naval jelly whatever) and a little bit of zinc added. For zinc I use either scraps of plated steel or hot dipped nails. You dont need a lot of zinc. The mix works fast but I do several reps with rinsing in water in between. Sorta like cold Parkerizing. Very durable finish and works fast so I watch it closely not to overdo it

whetrock
May 1, 2013, 04:58 PM
On my smaller, traditional pocket knives, I just fill a cup with vinegar to the point it leaves nearly the whole blade submerged, and let it set overnight. The result is a blacker than night patina, that'll ward off rust like crazy. I've found the patina can "crawl" though, and usually I leave about half of the tang stamp exposed so, I don't corrode the bolsters. Opinels are awesome by the way, and everybody needs to try one IMO.

SniperStraz
May 1, 2013, 05:01 PM
Generally vinegar is good for a total patina and mustard is good for making designes.

lobo9er
May 12, 2013, 12:43 AM
Use it in the kitchen. Cutting meats and oranges will put a nice patina on a carbon blade. I prefer a patina from use rather than forcing it.

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