Lyme Disease


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MtnCreek
May 3, 2013, 12:00 PM
Maybe a little off topic, but it's something hunters, outdoorsmen and people in rural areas should be knowledgeable about. I'm very early in my studying on the subject, but will likely be pretty up to speed on it in short order. I have a child that's been unofficially diagnosed with lyme disease as of today. Bloodtests will tell for sure and we're expecting results of that within a week.

Check out the link below (CDC) and take a little time to know what it is and how to identify it. It's very important to diagnose this early.

http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

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Kingcreek
May 3, 2013, 12:46 PM
You will find there is a lot of controversy and a (growing) group of patients and professionals alike that disagree with the CDC testing and treatment guidelines. Check out the documentary movie "Under Our Skin".

Dryft
May 3, 2013, 02:08 PM
I was diagnosed and treated for Lyme a few years ago, and all I can say is attack it aggressively and get bloodwork regularly. I used to do a ton of mountain biking down in New Jersey with friends, and half of us acquired it one summer - one of us is still feeling the impact of it, but he did choose to combat it homeopathically...

Something to also be mindful of is Babesiosis - which is a sort of lightweight North American malaria. I did my three month antibiotic treatment for Lyme and a few weeks later started feeling lousy again - fortunately my doctor had had it and knew to order the tests. Treatment for that is shorter, but I'll admit to feeling that neither truly left my system, and I occasionally feel like I'm having a little bit of a "relapse".

Good luck! Be proactive is my best advice, and it looks like you are.

Patocazador
May 3, 2013, 02:40 PM
Lyme's can have latent effects years after the first encounter. I believe that severe arthritis and some heart problems are possible long after the initial bite. In a few individuals there are no detected initial symptoms but years later they find out that their problems are caused by Lyme's disease. A "bulls eye" red patch at the bite site is the most common initial symptom.

buck460XVR
May 3, 2013, 02:50 PM
I had Lyme's about 20 years ago. The area I live in has the second highest incidence of Lyme's in North America. The probability of having a dog, any dog that goes outside, over 2 years of age without Lyme's around here, is pretty slim.

Kingcreek
May 3, 2013, 04:09 PM
The bullseye rash may only appear in 50% of those infected and many don't even recall a bite.
I had many tick bites and a rash that would come and go but the CDC said no LD in our area and I didn't have a rash when I saw the dr so it couldn't be LD according to the neurologist. Until I lost a dog to Lyme and the vet told me our area was full of it. So after being told I had MS for almost 2 years, I found out it was actually Lyme. Fired the idiot neurologist after testing confirmed it and treated aggressively. Don't take Lyme lightly.

3212
May 3, 2013, 04:48 PM
A friend of mine contracted Lyme disease and developed severe rheumatoid arthritis.Years later he still has the effects.

Mobuck
May 3, 2013, 05:09 PM
I was diagnosed with Lyme's 5 years ago and went through a week's IV treatment. I improved quickly compared to some others who have had the disease but I also feel continued consequences such as joint and muscle pain.
Being a farmer, I get lots of tick bites and don't know which of the dozens of tick bites infected me. The disease manifested itself in extreme joint pain, lethargy, and weakness to the point of being unable to climb stairs or even rise from a chair w/o assistance.

351 WINCHESTER
May 3, 2013, 05:31 PM
I got a tick bite about 4 years ago and got the classis bullseye so I went to my Dr. I told her that I had lyme disease and she looked at me like how do you know. I told her about the classic bulleye and showed it to her. She googled it on her I pad and gave me a script for tetracycline as I recall. I have not had any problems since. Thank God I caught it early.

Godsgunman
May 3, 2013, 05:49 PM
I've had a similar experience as most of the posters have. A few years back we would play paintball out at my pastor's farm. I had noticed a few ticks crawling on me after and a few that had already imbedded. Anyways about a month or 2 later I was in the hospital for gallbladder surgery and had a mystery fever of 103 degrees that they could not figure out why I had it because it was a seperate issue from my gallbladder. After a week of being stuck in the hospital they started treating me for lymes/erlichia/rocky mountain spotted fever. The treatment worked even though the early blood tests were negative. With most the tick-borne illnesses the initial bloodwork can show up negative because the body hasn't developed the specifics antibodies yet. I still everyonce in awhile feel the effect of whatever it actually was by getting achy joints and lowgrade fever if I overdo it and Im still fairly young in my early 30s. Never take putting on repellent when in the woods. Lymes is nothing to laugh at.

josiewales
May 3, 2013, 06:18 PM
My Mother and one sister both have Lyme disease. My mother is now, for all intents and purposes, a invalid. She can hardly sleep, has constant back pain, and is always very, very tired. And, yes, she is on treatment. One year ago she had more energy than I did. She loves to work outside in the garden, but now she has to sit inside all day long, hoping things will get better. CURSE THE ROTTEN LITTLE BUGGERS!! Now we are considering moving to a dryer climate to escape from the possibility of one of the rest of us contracting it. We live in PA.

Patocazador
May 4, 2013, 10:51 AM
I got a tick bite about 4 years ago and got the classis bullseye so I went to my Dr. I told her that I had lyme disease and she looked at me like how do you know. I told her about the classic bulleye and showed it to her. She googled it on her I pad and gave me a script for tetracycline as I recall. I have not had any problems since. Thank God I caught it early.
Sounds like you need a new doctor. When you have to tell the doctor .. or the mechanic what to do, it's time to change.

mountain_man
May 5, 2013, 09:32 PM
I was told if you get bitten by a tick, it is best to save the tick. That way if you have a reaction, they can identify it easier. I don't know if its true but that's what I have been told.

ZeroJunk
May 5, 2013, 09:48 PM
http://www.jemsekspecialty.com/lyme_detail.php


Hope this link works. My wife has been going here for a year and a half or so and she is back about 90%. She had gotten to the point she could not get out of a chair, tub, or even turn a door knob.

Good info.

MtnCreek
May 6, 2013, 08:16 AM
Thanks for all the info and links.

jbkebert
May 6, 2013, 08:25 AM
Sorry to hear of your troubles.

Find what is known as a Lyme Literate Doctor. The amount of false negatives for Lyme disease is very high. Yet the amount of false positives in almost zero. Like mentioned above there is a lot of controversy of the validity of Lyme. Here in Kansas a Dr. lost her license for over testing patients for the disease.

I just went to a couple hour seminar on Lyme disease a month ago. I will try and find the specific websites and post them later. Good luck and take this disease very seriously from the seminar it does not sound like fun.

Best of luck
Jeremy

Patocazador
May 6, 2013, 09:23 AM
The latest issue of OUTSIDE magazine has a lengthy article about tick-borne diseases. They state that you have only a very small chance of contracting any tick-transmitted disease if the tick is removed in the first 24 hours. It seems that once the tick attaches, it starts sucking blood for its only blood meal during that life stage. This takes the better part of a day. Then the tick injects saliva that may contain Lyme's, R.Mtn. spotted fever, babesiosis, and/or Erlichia. It states that the Lone Star tick's saliva can make people allergic to eating meat. In all, over half a dozen diseases are carried by ticks. They recommend bathing immediately after being out around shrubbery or in the woods. Washing and drying your clothes on HOT will kill the tick adults as well as the nymphs.

22-rimfire
May 6, 2013, 03:12 PM
I pay a lot of attention to Tics in the woods. Have had many on me over the years. One issue that is fairly new is this allergy that is developing. I have it. Pay attention to tics.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/11/21/165633003/rare-meat-allergy-caused-by-tick-bites-may-be-on-the-rise

Ken70
May 6, 2013, 03:54 PM
That's a nasty disease, friend had it for 10 years before the doctors finally figured out what she had. California has a lizard that kills the Lyme disease organism when the tick bites it. Antibody gets into the tick and no more Lyme...

CharlieDeltaJuliet
May 6, 2013, 04:16 PM
Trust me tick born disease of any sort is bad. I have had RMSF (Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever) twice.... There are less than 3k cases of it a year. My Dr actually told me my odds were better at winning the lottery or being struck by lightning twice that having RMSF,twice....They are in the same family of disease. I had it when I was 9 and it had little effect on me other than being really sick for a week and a half. I caught it again at 30 and it dang near killed me. I have had back and joint pain ever since..

I wish your child the very best. I truly do.

T.R.
May 8, 2013, 08:20 PM
I was treated for a tick bite just 3 days ago. Rx was for Doxycycline hyclate 100mg. This should eliminate the opportunity for lyme disease to occur.

Praise God for modern medicines!!

TR

bandk
May 9, 2013, 05:22 PM
My dog had Erlichia.
Wow, he was sick. Impressive.
He got better with doxycycline. Fortunately its $4 for a month supply at Target.

r1derbike
May 9, 2013, 07:56 PM
I suffered a bout of Ehrlichiosis Chaffeensis for months and took Doxycycline for several months. I'm OK now, but it has left some lingering problems. Lyme disease and variants are more destructive, but I just couldn't shake this infection.

It was named for a soldier who died from the first known case of this strain, from a tick bite at Ft. Chaffee, in Arkansas.

CharlieDeltaJuliet
May 9, 2013, 08:05 PM
Anyone that says there are no long term side effects are wrong. My vision went from 20/25-20/35 to 20-200-20/325. I now have osteoarthritis in my joints and especially bad in my back. I am 36 years old, so this isn't normal. To be honest though, I did go too long before getting to the hospital. I waited almost a week and a half. A good friend who knew I was sick stopped in to check on me and found me in a comatose state in my living room floor. By then I had swollen so bad the Dr's thought I had spinal meningitis, so had a spinal tap and all that good stuff with a couple weeks in the hospital. I now have nerve issues and nerve pain.

I will be honest, after going through all of that I am just glad to be alive. There are some that are far worse off than I am from it. I am just thankful I had RMSF and not Lyme.

ApacheCoTodd
May 9, 2013, 10:49 PM
Outstanding thread for getting info in a "bullet statement" or anecdotal sort of way.
Thanks for starting it "Creek".

Osageid
May 9, 2013, 11:24 PM
I practice infectious diseases and I must say that there is one disease not mentioned that is/ can be tick related and that is Francisella tularensis or "tularemia" ,"rabbit hunters disease". So keep up barrier protection and repellant!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

22-rimfire
May 12, 2013, 07:04 PM
I have read that keeping a sheet of the fabric softener in each pocket will help retard tics from wanting to jump on you. Helps for mosquitos also. It works on blood sucking bed bugs.

PonyKiller
May 14, 2013, 11:51 PM
I've lived at the edge of the pine barrens in nj all my life. deer ticks and lyme disease are a constant everpresent threat. here its the deer tick's you have to worry about. they are tiny. if you have a big ugly tick on you, your generally ok. but our trips to the woods are always accompanied by deet and permithrin keep the buggers off, and if they climb on, dead

MtnCreek
May 15, 2013, 09:49 AM
here its the deer tick's you have to worry about. they are tiny.

Good point. A little more info. My son asked his teacher to check his back; he thought he had a bug bite. Teacher checked and didn't see anything. A few days later, he said something to me about possibly having a bug bite. I checked and found the tick; it was tiny and I see how it could have been easily missed by his teacher. It's my understanding it takes around 24 hrs for an infected tick to transmit the disease.

Had the teacher found the tick, this might have been prevented.

Had we talked to our son about the dangers of ticks (bug bites in general), he might have mentioned it to us in time to prevent this.

We're not going to be doing any daily body searches, but a little time discussing it before hand and this would likely have been a nonissue.

climbnjump
May 15, 2013, 12:03 PM
but our trips to the woods are always accompanied by deet and permithrin keep the buggers off, and if they climb on, dead

Dog flea and tick collars - they're not just for dogs anymore... You can wear one around each boot ankle.

Back in the late '90's, there was a Lyme vaccine available and I did get it. However, since it is (was) only about 80% effective, I continue to take other precautions as well.

The vaccine was taken off the market after a few years - you can blame lawyers and money-grubbing "vaccine victims" for that.

This history of that can be read at the following link:
http://www.wbur.org/2012/06/27/lyme-vaccine

CharlieDeltaJuliet
May 15, 2013, 01:08 PM
MtnCreek, you are correct about the usual transmitting time for a tick born disease, but one thing the CDC told me is that if the tick is squeezed it can transmit upon bite. That's why they say having a Dr. remove them is best. But burning them to have them release works also using tweezers to pull the head or the tick out works.

Please everyone be careful. I have been down this road and it isn't a pleasent one to travel. Take precautions, use tick collars and repellents.

NormB
May 15, 2013, 01:09 PM
Dog flea and tick collars - they're not just for dogs anymore... You can wear one around each boot ankle.

Back in the late '90's, there was a Lyme vaccine available and I did get it. However, since it is (was) only about 80% effective, I continue to take other precautions as well.

The vaccine was taken off the market after a few years - you can blame lawyers and money-grubbing "vaccine victims" for that.

This history of that can be read at the following link:
http://www.wbur.org/2012/06/27/lyme-vaccine
I got the vaccine - Lymerix - twice. Had a booster maybe a year or so after the first shot. Figured why not, my dogs do.

Couple years later I started having migraine HAs. Neurologist says they're migraines, take Imitrex for them.

Having joint pains. Intermittent fevers, chills. Rheumatologist and other internist says don't worry, you have arthritis (long history of injuries), made some sense.

Then started having palpitations and shortness of breath. Anxiety, stop drinking coffee and alcohol my internist said, but she tested me for Lyme anyway.

Bingo. IgM AND IgG bands lit up all over. Oh, you had the vaccine, she said. Never mind, it's false positive.

Except it wasn't. I took a ten day course of penicillin anyway, wound up going on doxycycline a year later for adult acne (where did THAT come from?), palpitations stopped happening despite the caffeine, alcohol and job stress.

I'm a Family Practice Physician. I try not to treat my own medical issues, but a LOT of doctors don't know sh** about Lyme. Or other tick-borne diseases. ALL ticks can carry lyme, and several other infectious diseases. Deer, Dog, Lone Star ticks have all been found to be vectors for borrelia, babesiosis, HGE, RMSF and several other bugs. And "adult" ticks don't carry Lyme? Really? It doesn't kill them as nymphs and there may be other intermediate vectors for the spirochete besides white-footed mice and deer. I've trapped possum, raccoon and foxes here and they're usually covered with ticks. Think someone's vaccinating all the wildlife?

Oh, and the migraines went away while on doxycycline. Isn't that interesting. I added that to my diagnostic tool kit... meaning, no family history of migraines and you're just now getting them? Let's test you for lyme just in case. I've gotten several hits that way. You have lyme isn't a great way to start a follow up medical appointment but it has turned up when nothing else has.

Anyway, that was all ten years ago, I've been tested again. And again.

Look for a documentary called "Under Our Skin." Not going to judge it, just suggest you watch it.

Patocazador
May 15, 2013, 04:28 PM
Dog collars aren't very effective at preventing ticks. There is a special tick repellent dog collar called "Preventic" that I got for my dog from the vet. It is pretty expensive but it didn't keep ticks off my dog. I tried another one 'just in case' and it was no better. "Spotton" is a cow louse, tick preventive liquid that works but is dangerous due to its high toxicity. I think its the active ingredient in "FrontLine" products.

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