Sighting in an old Marlin 336


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Stargazer65
May 9, 2013, 10:24 AM
I have this old rifle, no manual. Been sitting in my gun locker for a while and I want to start using it finally. It's a Marlin 336 RC .35 Rem. It's was a free hand me down, hasn't been used in a while obviously. It's in good condition mechanically, although the wood is well worn and there is surface splotches (oxidation?) on the metal. The ammo (Remington Core llock 200gr) that came with it looks good but must be old, the sticker price on all of them is $4.05 for a box of 20. It is drilled and tapped on the receiver, but I want to try it out with the iron sights.

My question is about adjusting the sight. It has a ramp on the rear sight. If I slide it back, the rear sight raises. Will that raise where it hits the target? Also, I'm not used to shooting more than 100 yds. Should I sight it in at 100 yds? Maybe I should try it at 50 to rough it in? Any suggestions...

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Eb1
May 9, 2013, 10:27 AM
What do you need to know? For shooting out to 200 yards sight it in @ 4" high @ 100 yards.

Drift the rear sight the way you want the bullet to move.

Stargazer65
May 9, 2013, 10:35 AM
For shooting out to 200 yards sight it in @ 4" high @ 100 yards.

Drift the rear sight the way you want the bullet to move.

That's probably the informationl I need to know. Thanks.

If you know where I can I pick up more boxes of .35 at $4.05 that'd be handy also.:D

Eb1
May 9, 2013, 10:37 AM
Sighting in 4" high will probably put you a little low @ 200, but keep you in the MPBR of the caliber and vitals for a deer. I don't know where to buy a one completed cartridge for under $5 these days. :(

jim243
May 9, 2013, 10:48 AM
Be sure to clean and oil it before use, if as old as you say. Personal choice, but I would skip the old ammo. Should be alright and may be hard to find today in current conditions. If you reload you may want to break them apart and redo the powder and primers.

Raise the ramp for longer distance, bring the ramp down for closer in. I have my scope set for 75 yards and should be good to go up to 150 yards.

Be sure to clean the barrel since they use non-standard rifling. Not sure about your model, but can not hurt to have a clean bore. Especially if the previous owner shot a lot of home cast bullets in it.

Good luck and have fun with it.
Jim

If you know where I can I pick up more boxes of .35 at $4.05 that'd be handy also

LOL, good luck on that one.

http://i620.photobucket.com/albums/tt284/bigjim_02/SAM_0319.jpg (http://s620.photobucket.com/user/bigjim_02/media/SAM_0319.jpg.html)

Stargazer65
May 9, 2013, 11:41 AM
I have a shipment of Hornady 200 gr on it's way. I'll probably use that to sight it in. I have tested it with the old ammo, it seems to work fine, but only two shots. It hit low at 50 yards, but I didn't want to mess with the sights yet until I get more familiar.

moxie
May 9, 2013, 12:01 PM
Here is your owners manual. It has sighting in info.

http://www.marlinfirearms.com/pdfs/manuals/MFC_Centerfire.pdf

Here's a decent deal on the new leverevolution ammo:
http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/product_info.php/pName/20rds-35-rem-hornady-leverevolution-200gr-ftx-flex-tip-ammo/cName/rifle-ammo-35-remington

or traditional ammo:
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shooting/Ammunition/Rifle-Ammunition%7C/pc/104792580/c/104691780/sc/104532480/Federal174-Power-Shok8482-Ammunition/728422.uts?destination=/catalog/browse/shooting-ammunition-rifle-ammunition/_/N-1100190/Ns-CATEGORY_SEQ_104532480?recordsPerPage=99999&avad=74383_b443ebe7&WT.mc_id=al56335&rid=12&WT.tsrc=AFF#productChart

Stargazer65
May 9, 2013, 12:24 PM
Thanks, that manual will be handy. I notice one difference though, the manual talks about a hammer block safety. This rifle doesn't have one of those.

moxie
May 9, 2013, 12:40 PM
Marlin started including a safety fairly recently. Otherwise very few changes except stock configuration.

Salmoneye
May 9, 2013, 04:28 PM
Marlin started including a safety fairly recently.

!983

moxie
May 9, 2013, 04:33 PM
That's fairly recently, from my perspective buying my 336T in 1968.

jmr40
May 9, 2013, 07:48 PM
Zeroing rifles with that type of rear sight involves a bit or trial and error. As you noted moving the rear sight up and down in the ramp will change elevation. If you need to change windage you'll need to lightly tap the rear sight with a plastic or wood mallet in the direction you need your groups to move. Be careful, it doesn't take much. Often you won't even be able to detect any movement and will move the groups 1" or more. Don't expect to get the elevation perfect. You'll often find your groups slightly lower than you want in one notch, and slightly higher than you want in the next. Pick one and live with it.

Sighting in 4" high is a good way to miss deer. I'd zero at no more than 100 yards and even 50 wouldn't be a bad idea. 99% of your shots will be at under 100 yards and with a zero of 75 the bullet won't be above, or below your line of sight by more than 2.5" out to 125 yards. Only 5" low at 150 yards which is about as far as the cartridge is good for. Being that high at 100 yards is a good way to shoot over a deer at close range, where almost all of your shots take place. It is much more natural to remember to hold high on long shots than hold low on close shots.

Good luck on ammo. The 35 is a decent round, but is slowly becoming obslolete. No one is currently making rifles chambered in 35 anymore. There are few places that carry ammo and most of it is pricey. I still prefer the older 200 gr Remington loads, but see more of the new Hornady LeverEvolution on shelves lately.

moxie
May 9, 2013, 08:30 PM
jmr40,
As I noted in post #7 above, .35 Rem. ammo is readily available, even the traditional offerings. More expensive than .30-30, but not prohibitively so. It's always been somewhat of a specialty round.

Eb1
May 9, 2013, 08:54 PM
125 yards is about all a .35 Remington is good for? You sure about that?

Salmoneye
May 10, 2013, 06:57 AM
It's always been somewhat of a specialty round.

Maybe down south, but it has been a standard in the northern New England deer woods since the Model 8 Remington...

336 has kept it alive and well...

Salmoneye
May 10, 2013, 07:05 AM
125 yards is about all a .35 Remington is good for? You sure about that?

Firing a 'standard' 200gr Core-Lokt with a scope 1" above bore line sighted at 3" high @100 yards, your maximum point blank range is about 185 yards...

Lever Evolution ammo extends that to over 200 Yards...

Hand loading certain 'other' bullets can get you a few more yards than that...

ADDING:

.35 Rem can also utilize any .38/.357 'handgun' bullet...158gr cast is one of my favorite plinkers when seated over low doses of 'pistol' powders...Not a lot of data out there, but enough to keep me shooting...Also have a (published) recipe for .360" round balls...

627PCFan
May 10, 2013, 10:27 AM
".35 Rem can also utilize any .38/.357 'handgun' bullet...158gr cast is one of my favorite plinkers when seated over low doses of 'pistol' powders...Not a lot of data out there, but enough to keep me shooting...Also have a (published) recipe for .360" round balls... "


If you got Cast with Ballard rifling, make sure its sized to .359+

Salmoneye
May 10, 2013, 02:29 PM
Even with Micro-Groove, you want at least a thousandth over bore diameter with cast, and .002" is better...

I said any pistol bullet would work...

But some 'work' better than others...

;)

03Shadowbob
May 10, 2013, 08:59 PM
Don't tell my Marlin in 35R that it is only good to 125 yards. If it had known that I wouldn't have been able to kill that deer way past that.

Maj Dad
May 10, 2013, 09:48 PM
Be sure to clean the barrel since they use non-standard rifling.
Unless your barrel has "Micro Groove Rifling" stamped/engraved on it, the rifling is standard and there are no special caveats on lead bullets. Marlin started using the Micro Groove in the early to mid-70s - my M1895 was made in 74 and has Micro Groove, but one made in 73 has standard (some say it is Ballard style, I don't know that for sure) rifling. Today, the M1895s do have Ballard cut rifling, don't know about the other calibers.

Zeke/PA
May 10, 2013, 09:50 PM
That's probably the informationl I need to know. Thanks.

If you know where I can I pick up more boxes of .35 at $4.05 that'd be handy also.:D
$ 4.05 for a box of .35 Remington ammo?
Those days are LONG gone my friend.
The Marlin 336 is a great rifle and the .35 Remington a great older chambering.
I own an older Marlin .35 Remington that is a great shooter and a fine deer rifle to boot.

Salmoneye
May 11, 2013, 08:08 AM
Marlin started using the Micro Groove in the early to mid-70s

Micro-Groove rifling started on Marlin .22's in mid-1953, and all 336's by end of 1954...

The 1895 indeed had Ballard rifling when introduced in '72, and then switched to MG, and then back to Ballard, though I am uncertain of the change dates...

Maj Dad
May 14, 2013, 12:48 AM
Thanks for the fact-check, Salmoneye. I was thinking of the 1895, just didn't realize it started so early on the 336s...

foghornl
May 14, 2013, 08:53 AM
Hey, if you can find .35Rem ammo for less than $4.05 per round.......

Once you get the sights set to YOUR eyes, etc, you're gonna find that you REALLY like that Marlin in .35. A serious thumper down range, not too bad on the shoulder of the shooter. A bit more 'kick' than a .30/30, but very manageable.

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