Reloading kit vs. ala cart


PDA






Jcinnb
May 10, 2013, 09:13 AM
Been looking at a Rockchucker reloading kit since before panic. About ready to pull the trigger, and then started thinking.....uhoh.

In most of my other hobbies I would never buy a kit, I would assemble the best components I could afford and go from there.

What do you guys think about getting a kit, or shopping for each component?

The Rockchucker kit looks good, and I have no reason to think it is not the way to go, but as I have learned over the years....You don't know, what you don't know!

Thanks in advance.

jcinnb

If you enjoyed reading about "Reloading kit vs. ala cart" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
sbrader
May 10, 2013, 09:55 AM
I can't speak for the Rockchucker kit, but I can tell you about my experience with a kit from a different manufacturer. I have ended up replacing virtually every component in the kit except the press. I would have saved money in the long run by just buying ala carte.

I would buy one of Brian Enos' custom "kits" in a heartbeat if I had the money to do so, but that's quite a bit different than the manufacturers kits. I just found that I liked the scale from one manufacturer and the powder measure from another, etc. which led to my current set up that I am very happy with.

That's just my experience, though.

Blue68f100
May 10, 2013, 10:03 AM
The RCBS kit is very good. The scales have been around for ever and very reliable. As with all kits there are stuff missing that you will need. I would not hesitate to buy the RCBS kit, Lee YES.

Fall Guy
May 10, 2013, 10:20 AM
The Rock Chucker kit looks pretty good to me and is probably the only kit I would recommend to someone starting to reload. I have found it to be priced pretty well for what you get. I specifically like the press, scale, powder measure, and hand primer. I would prefer a different loading manual and case lube system. Even at that it is a good buy since it never hurts to have another manual and it includes some smaller items that can add up in cost quickly.

oneounceload
May 10, 2013, 11:03 AM
RCBS typically includes one of the better Ohaus-made scales in their kits. However, the older 5-10 and 10-10 are even better than the 505, so you might look around on Craigs List or similar for some of the necessary gadgets.

In reality, you need a press, scale, and dies to reload - everything else just makes the process a lot easier - loading blocks, bullet puller, case prep, reamer, trimmer, tumbler, etc. etc......like any good hobby along the lines of fishing or woodworking, there are hundreds of items available - which ones are worth it is up to you and your type of shooting. IMO, it is always easier to add stuff as you discover you need it than to get rid of it once you have it - I tend to put those items in a drawer and they seem to multiply as the years go on... ;)

aka108
May 10, 2013, 11:23 AM
I bought the Lee Anniversary setup when I got started. Everything in that kit has been replace with other items. Some from Lee, RCBS, Dillon and home grown. Lee case length trimmers are inexpensive, quick and easy to use.

ArchAngelCD
May 10, 2013, 11:29 AM
Not all kits are equal and that holds true for the company's products in those kits. Since you're talking about RCBS and you usually buy the best I think you are talking about one in the same. RCBS products are the ones reloaders usually upgrade to so if you're starting with RCBS, well...

bigdaa
May 10, 2013, 11:36 AM
I would have bought the kit if it were around back in 1980.

But...........I essentially have it and feel it would be worth it for your starting platform.

I do not use the lube pad or RCBS lube anymore. I have been using Hornady One Shot spray lube for years now.

The powder thrower is good and I have no issues with it. I use a compressor to blow out all remnants between powder changes.

The only issue with my 33 year old Rock Chucker is that I have busted about 5 or 6 primer arm springs. I ALWAYS keep a brand new one on hand.

bds
May 10, 2013, 11:45 AM
You may want to consider this also.

Currently RCBS is running a promotion where if you spend $300 on RCBS products, you get 500 Speer Gold Dot HP pistol or Grand Slam SP rifle bullets (http://www.rcbs.com/pdf/RC316_2013RCBSWebRebateCoupon_FNL.pdf) (Or you can also get $50 rebate).

Depending on which bullets you choose (say 500 45 cal 185 gr Gold Dot HP), you could save a few hundred dollars off the kit. You could either sell the bulllets or reload them for yourself. ;)

MidwayUSA has the Rock Chucker Supreme Master Kit for $320 (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/937051/rcbs-rock-chucker-supreme-master-single-stage-press-kit) so if you appled the "value" of 500 Speer Gold Dot bullets, it would be like getting the press kit for less than half price. :D

Clark
May 10, 2013, 12:15 PM
I got the RCBS rockchucker reloading kit when I started reloading in 1999.


1) Rockchucker press .. don't use it anymore, I now use Forster and Bonanza Co-ax presses with shellholer jaw housing I redesigned and made on my mill, and an RCBS Partner press.
2) "Speer 12" reloading manual... loads in it are a joke, I find my start load with Quickload software.
3) Bottle of glycerin for lube... don't use it any more, now use Redding imperial die wax.
4) Pad for applying glycerin... don't use it, I use my fingers.
5) Brush for lubing inside of case neck.. don't use it any more, I remove the expander ball so I don't need inside lube.
6) Loading tray made of plastic... don't use it. I seat bullets as soon as I charge the case, with a second press.
7) Wire brush for cleaning primer pockets. Don't use it.
8) case trimmer, don't use it anymore. I now use a Forster case trimmer or RCBS 3 way in the vertical mill
9) Funnel, don't use it, I use a Frankfort Arsenal or MTM funnel.
10) 5-0-5 scale [Ohaus OEM]... I still use it.
11) Uniflow powder measure.... I still use it.
12) Inside outside neck chamfer [ Wilson OEM] I still use it.

Other stuff I use not cross referenced to the kit:
1) Wilson Case gauge
2) Sinclair concentricity gauge
3) Lyman Moly coating kit, but with steel BBs and magnetic separation
4) Vibrators, ultra sound, and stainless steel media in a tumbler for cleaning
5) Forster and Lee priming tools
6) Lee Collet neck dies polished in my lathe.
7) Forster FL dies with necks honed out in Forster's Hardinge lathes.
8) Forster seating dies with seater stem polished on my lathe
9) Dial calipers
10) Enco set of pin gauges .0610" to .2500"
11) Enco set of pin gauges .2510" - .5000"
12) Optivisor magnifier headset
13) Dillon Super Swage 600 military crimp remover
14) Lux lamp magnifier
15) Bullets, brass, primers, and powder
16) Berry's bullets plastic ammo boxes
17) 3M Post-its for labeling.
18) Forster headspace go-gauge

mdi
May 10, 2013, 01:16 PM
I personally don't purchase kits, at least not the kind one would use for reloading equipment. I think the marketing people decide what one "needs" when buying a kit, not the user. I like to research each piece of equipment/tool I buy as some manufacturers make a better specific tool than others. I have Lee presses, but I believe C-H makes a better powder measure than Lee. I have dies from most but believe Redding makes a superior crimp die. I research and purchase each tool for what it is, nor necessarily what brand it is.

oldpapps
May 10, 2013, 01:45 PM
"getting a kit, or shopping for each component?"

For a person just getting started a 'kit' may be the way to go.
The other side of this is some/most kits may have some lesser items.

I don't need any more equipment but I often get asked what should be bought. So I look at the 'kits'. I have yet to find a 'kit' that I would want 75% of what is provided.

My opinion, buy the items 'you' want. Use the listings of 'kits' to try to not miss anything. If what you want is close to one of the kits to make the cost viable, go for it. If not, put together your own list.

Certaindeaf
May 10, 2013, 01:50 PM
Back not too long ago a "non-kit" was easy to do. You'd get on a good site like Natchez and click on anything to your hearts content.. fun! Now, it might be an effort in frustration, what with many things being out of stock, one might have to go to many different sites to get a widget and the additional shipping costs/hassles. ug

Jcinnb
May 10, 2013, 03:24 PM
Thanks for all the excellent comments. I appreciate your time and expertise!

Jcinnb

readyeddy
May 10, 2013, 04:45 PM
Check out the sticky "reloading library of wisdom". There's a link called "READ THIS FIRST". Kits will inevitably contain tools that are inferior and also will not include parts that are essential. It's not complicated as you should be able to get by with maybe a dozen or less reloading tools.

Elkins45
May 10, 2013, 07:04 PM
Is the Rockchucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit what you're considering? I see it has the hand priming tool included, which is a very handy addition. The scale and Uniflow powder measure are also good solid pieces of gear that will last a few lifetimes. All you need are dies and a shellholder and you would be ready to go.

You will need a trimmer for rifle cases, but the little Lee cheapie system is the way to go IMO unless you're loading something really unusual.

Dontkillbill
May 10, 2013, 07:11 PM
Nothing but good luck with the Lee single stage press anniversary kit. Its not for everyone but I find it good and I reload enough to give a fair opinion.

twofifty
May 10, 2013, 07:29 PM
I went 'a la carte' because I had the chance to try two other reloaders' setups before purchasing my own stuff. Without that prior experience, it would have been hard to select tools from the various brands out there, so I probably would have gone for a kit.

41 Mag
May 11, 2013, 05:53 AM
When I started loading I was very young, and I used my Pop's set up. It was VERY basic, a Well's press, powder measure similar to the Uniflow, and a scale. Our dies were all C&H, and everything we did was one step at a time.

I used that same equipment from the early 70's until I started to purchase other items in my early teens. I added a tumbler, a trimmer, and calipers. During this time I was mainly loading rifle rounds for hunting and limited target practice. When I was 17-18 I got into handgun pretty hard and heavy and that is when I needed production and started looking for a progressive.

The bottom line is I now have a LOT of different equipment. What I actually use on a regular basis are a Rock Chucker, a 505 scale, the Uniflow, calipers, small Midway brand tumbler, Lee hand primer, Lyman trimmer and what ever caliber dies I need, most of which are Hornady or RCBS. I can load plenty of rounds on the single stage to get me through a weekend of shooting or hunting or even target practice. Even moving them through in stages, I get done relatively quick.

If I were just getting into this I would certainly shop out everything individually, but after considering the added shipping or availability, I would probably go ahead and pick up a kit especially one like the RCBS in order to get most of it in one shot. Once you get up and running and actually learn what your doing, you might see areas of improvement with other tools. I would spend more on adding loading manuals for cross reference and loads than I would on the specialty tools at this point.

splattergun
May 11, 2013, 11:47 AM
IMO, the most basic NEEDS to start loading;
a press
a manual or 3
a scale
a powder measure
calipers
dies
lube

If there is a kit that supplies these minimum needs at the quality you wish to use, buy it. If not, buy a la cart.

FROGO207
May 12, 2013, 07:40 AM
I always tell the new reloader to seek out a reloading mentor if possible. The first and foremost reason is to get "hands on" experience with the various tools and processes that the mentor uses. Also they have a lot of things that they have learned that you can not find in the books---how it feels to seat a primer correctly and how to "feel" if a casing is going to stick are but a couple things of the many that I have never found well explained in any text. When using someones tools you see how they work and any shortcomings without having to buy first. If you end up like me there will be several "extra" or even duplicate things on your bench over the years. I own several presses, multiple ways to prime, multiple ways to clean, and at least two die sets for most calibers I reload.

To answer your question, buying a kit may be the easiest way to get started with the limited supplies these days but assembling your dream kit from multiple sources the first time around will be the goal if possible.

cowtownup
May 12, 2013, 10:48 AM
I bought the single stage Hornady LNL kit and it has done well for me.. I added Lee dies and a couple reloading trays and I knock down 1000 rounds a month with no problem..

TexasShooter59
May 12, 2013, 11:20 AM
I started reloading about 3 years ago and had the same question as you. I decided to go the individual pieces route. Since then, I have upgraded case trimmer, funnel and added a few tools to make life easier or faster. I also added a powder measure, and got a better press, as I started on the cheapest press I could find to see if I liked reloading or not. The first press is dedicated to depriming now.

Magnum Shooter
May 12, 2013, 11:21 AM
You can’t go wrong with the Rockchucker kit, it has the beam scale that is the standard by which others are jugged. The powder measure it as good as they come. All with great customer service and lifetime warranty.

Potatohead
May 12, 2013, 11:31 AM
Hey thx for posting this thread jcinn. I'm watching it closely.

Katitmail
May 12, 2013, 01:24 PM
Currently RCBS is running a promotion where if you spend $300 on RCBS products, you get 500 Speer Gold Dot HP pistol or Grand Slam SP rifle bullets (Or you can also get $50 rebate).

Depending on which bullets you choose (say 500 45 cal 185 gr Gold Dot HP), you could save a few hundred dollars off the kit. You could either sell the bulllets or reload them for yourself.

MidwayUSA has the Rock Chucker Supreme Master Kit for $320 so if you appled the "value" of 500 Speer Gold Dot bullets, it would be like getting the press kit for less than half price.

I almost jumped on this one because I still need scales and my press (Dillon) is on B/O. I have some dies so with this kit I can start playing. Rebate wording stopped me.. They say that demand is high and they may do $50 instead of bullets which is killing a deal for me.

918v
May 12, 2013, 02:01 PM
In most of my other hobbies I would never buy a kit, I would assemble the best components I could afford and go from there.

It should be no different with this hobby.

RCBS makes some good tools, the operative word is some. Lee makes some good tools as well. Redding tools are generally superior. Then you have the high end tools like Sinclair, K&M, Neil Jones, etc. Go with your gut. Your gut is right.

clutch
May 12, 2013, 02:29 PM
That looks like a decent kit to start with. I'm still running a old Lyman turret kit I bought 30 years ago. I've added stuff, I still want a Rock Chucker press for case forming.

Go for it. It will be fine.

westy16925
May 12, 2013, 02:35 PM
My wife got me a Lee Breech-lock Challenger kit when I was starting out. Now, the only thing I use out of it is the primer pocket cleaner,the funnel, the hand primer, and the shell holders for the primer. The press was replaced with a Redding Big Boss II. The scales were replaced with an older Lyman D7. The lube was replaced with Hornady Unique case sizing wax. The powder measure has been replaced by a Redding and a Hornady Auto-charge. The trimmer has been replaced with a Wilson/Sinclair micrometer trimmer. The case deburring tool has been replaced by a Forster. If I had it to do over, I would buy each piece individually. But my wife was more interested in the initial start-up cost.

Lost Sheep
May 12, 2013, 02:53 PM
Been looking at a Rockchucker reloading kit since before panic. About ready to pull the trigger, and then started thinking.....uhoh.

In most of my other hobbies I would never buy a kit, I would assemble the best components I could afford and go from there.
That tells me a lot about you. I agree completely with your approach.

Remember, though, that the "best components" varies. What is best for you is not the best for someone else. Best fit for your needs.
What do you guys think about getting a kit, or shopping for each component?

The Rockchucker kit looks good, and I have no reason to think it is not the way to go, but as I have learned over the years....You don't know, what you don't know!

There's the rub. How do you learn what you need to know to find the "best components" or a loading setup? And how do you figure that out without buying a few mistakes in the beginning. Might as well get a kit?

Thanks in advance.

jcinnb
A kit will get you started with ALMOST everything you need. They always lack something. They also have things you use, but will be unsatisfied with and trade in (at a loss, it goes without saying). So the savings in getting a kit is largely illusion. But it probably will get you started a little quicker.

A Kit will also have things you don't need, which is a waste of money But does provide some trade goods.

Building your own kit MAY be a little more expensive, but carries with it the research (and knowledge gained therefrom) you do in selecting the equipment best for you.

How long is your foresight?

Let's start out by looking at the bare essentials.

These two, you cannot load without, physically. Press and dies.

Powder can be measured out by scoops, by scale or by a powder measure or a combination of those and it would be exceedingly foolish (or suicidal) to load without measuring your powder accurately and reliably.

So, count three items as absolutely essential. (press, dies, scale) Everything else adds safety, effectiveness/accuracy and speed. (e.g. safety - eye protection while loading; effectiveness/accuracy - calipers; Speed - powder measure). Most additional tools can be done without, improvised or substituted for (e.g. a lube pad: fingers, paper towel, or sponge can do, or spray lube can be used).


The "more than are essential" items, though, are necessary for reasonable safety. A loading manual with load recipes and instructions of how to go about the process. A pair of safety glasses (just in case a primer goes off, which is rare, but can happen).

So, five things HIGHLY HIGHLY recommended, plus one extra.

A way to place primers in the priming cup on the press is a great help (rather than using your fingers) and will speed things up as well as reducing the chance that skin oils will contaminate the primers.

Six things and your are reasonably set up for everything you can expect.

Press
Dies
Scale
Primer handler of some kind
safety glasses
manual(s)

But there are always things you don't need to start with but will need or want later.

A bullet puller will enable you to disassemble any rounds you put together that are out of spec (or that you suspect might be). Loading blocks let you keep a batch of cartridges together conveniently. Micrometer will help measure things when you find that you want to measure something. Most store-bought bullets are the right size, so yo might not need the micrometer for a while.

As you load and develop your personal style, you will find things you would like to have. Pick them up as you go.

How you populate your loading bench, and with what pieces of gear is largely, then, a matter of personal style. There are several different ways to approach your question.

1) Buy a ready-made kit.

2) Assemble a kit of your own, choosing as complete a kit as you can get, of premium gear you will never outgrow.

3) Assemble a "bare essential" minimal kit piece-by-piece with the components you expect you will never outgrow and expanding as you

find need for each additional piece, slowly, and as money and knowledge allows.

4) Assemble a complete kit (of economy equipment) of your own choosing you know you will outgrow, by which time you will have figured

out what you will never outgrow, then trade up to those pieces.

5) Assemble a minimal kit of your own choosing with the least expensive components and upgrade as your tastes reveal themselves and as

money allows. Spend money for upgrades as your taste spurs you.


Each approach has its proponents. Each approach has its virtues and its drawbacks.


1 Store-bought "complete" kit. Swap out components as needed:
virtue: easy and requires little thought; gets you into production very quickly
drawback: can be wasteful, and requires little thought
(This is tantamount to the approach westy16925 took when his wife bought a kit for him, though his experience was extreme.)

2 Self-Assemble complete Kit:
virtue: requires you think about and learn loading BEFORE you commit money and body parts
drawback: requires a lot of study, and even so you may make less-than-optimal purchases

3 Slowly self-assemble premium components kit & add-on as you go
virtue: you learn about loading and your equipment thoroughly and only spend money as you are sure of what you are buying
drawback: takes more time (weeks, maybe before you are completely set up, though you can be loading the first weekend)

4 and 5 are variations on 2 and 3 and have much the same virtues and drawbacks.

The approaches I outlined should provide you some food for thought. What type of hobbyist are you? Are you analytical and thoughtful or do you jump right in and improvise as you go? Got more time than money, or more money than time?

My first advice: Read "The ABC's of Reloading", an excellent tome on the general processes of reloading.

Having said that, let me share with you some posts and threads I think you will enjoy. So get a large mug of coffee, tea, hot chocolate, whatever you keep on hand when you read and think and read through these.


The "sticky" thread at the top of TheHighRoad.com's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Thinking about Reloading; Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST"
http://www.thehighroad.org//showthread.php?t=238214

The "sticky" thread at the top of TheFiringLine's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST "
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230171

The first draft of my "10 Advices..." is on page 2 of this thread, about halfway down.
http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=448410

Thread entitled "Newby needs help."
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=430391
My post 11 is entitled "Here's my reloading setup, which I think you might want to model" November 21, 2010)
My post 13 is "10 Advices for the novice handloader" November 21, 2010)

http://www.Thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=439810

"Budget Beginning bench you will never outgrow for the novice handloader" was informed by my recent (July 2010) repopulation of my loading bench. It is what I would have done 35 years ago if I had known then what I know now.
http://www.rugerforum.net/reloading/29385-budget-beginning-bench-you-will-never-outgrow-novice-handloader.html

Minimalist minimal (the seventh post down)
http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=107332

It seems to me that with your attitude (I commented on at the beginning of this post), you will study up, select carefully and build an ideal kit of your own pretty quickly. But check out Kempf's gun shop for their kit, built around the Lee Classic Turret. It is unlike any other kit in that it 1) includes one set of dies and 2) (The biggest difference) does not attempt to be complete, but only gives you a core of tools to which you add manual, scale calipers and whatever other add-ons you wish.

Good luck,

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
May 12, 2013, 03:18 PM
Welcome to reloading. Thanks for asking our advice.

We could target our advice better if you shared some information about yourself: (What I use has no relevance to you if our needs are not similar.)

What calibers will you be reloading?

What quantities will you be reloading for those calibers?

How much time will you be willing to devote to those quantities

What is your budget?

Will you be putting your gear away after each session or leave it set up permanently?

How much space will you devote permanently to a loading area, if any?

Do you want it to be portable?

What are your shooting goals? Cheap ammo? Ultimate long-range accuracy? Casual plinking, Serious competition - what kind? Cowboy Action Shooting? Strictly hunting?

Lost Sheep

buck460XVR
May 12, 2013, 04:29 PM
The RCBS kit is one of the better ones. The average reloader will never want for a better SS press, scale or powder measure as with many of the other entry level kits out there. RCBS's warranty and CS means one will never have to pay for another scale/press /powder measure unless they want to. Other than the dies, calipers, some form of check weights and the components themselves, it has everything you need to make quality ammo at a cost less than buying them separately. If you want to move on to something different, the quality and the desirability of the equipment in the kit itself means it always will have good trade/resale value.

hang fire
May 12, 2013, 05:08 PM
Been looking at a Rockchucker reloading kit since before panic. About ready to pull the trigger, and then started thinking.....uhoh.

In most of my other hobbies I would never buy a kit, I would assemble the best components I could afford and go from there.

What do you guys think about getting a kit, or shopping for each component?

The Rockchucker kit looks good, and I have no reason to think it is not the way to go, but as I have learned over the years....You don't know, what you don't know!

Thanks in advance.

jcinnb

If a SS press is what you want, do not over look the Lee Classic Cast Iron.

I had a Lyman Orange Crusher, bought the Lee and the LOC now resides in the corner.

BullfrogKen
May 12, 2013, 11:43 PM
Lost Sheep's post #30 is about the best commentary on the matter as I've ever seen.


In the mid 90's I bought Lee's Anniversary Kit and learned on it. I used the press for well over a decade. I upgraded other tools as I got a feeling for where I was going with the hobby and by then, had enough experience to know what tools made most sense for me and my handloading needs.

mdi
May 13, 2013, 01:11 PM
Low budget, basic tool assortment; http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/51 Actually I started this way in '69...

Sniper66
May 13, 2013, 01:41 PM
I learned to reload from my brother who has mostly RCBS equipment. After some experience and researching, I decided to buy the individual pieces instead of the kit. Most importantly because I wanted the Chargemaster Powder Dispenser. After I got mine and loaded with my brother some more, he bought a Chargemaster. The other reason I would buy the individual components is because of the new single stage press. I would love to try the new press because the whole thing sits atop the bench where the RockChucker hangs below and I bang my knees into it, which is a bit of a nuisance. All that said though, the kit is very good and not a bad way to start. If you really get into it, you'll buy lots of additional equipment so have fun.

Jcinnb
May 13, 2013, 09:36 PM
Thanks for the wonderful advice. Lost sheep, your post is so awesome it needs to be captured somewhere. Thnk you for your intellect and time.

I read the ABSs back in January, and reviewed in depth in early April. I now have five reloading books on the kindle, and the newest Lyman guide on the bedside table.

Initially I will be reloading 25-06. I hope to eventually reload 7.62x54 and for my snake gun, long colt.

I hit the range twice a month, probably 150 - 200 rounds a day. Thanks again for all the replies.

justice06rr
May 13, 2013, 11:44 PM
As a potential reloader, I've also looked at that reloading kit and considering buying it. It seems to have most of the things one would need to start reloading other than components and other parts (dies, etc). For the price point its a good buy IMO. I'm sure there are better ones out there and I've seen more expensive kits by Lyman and other manufacturers.

grubbylabs
May 14, 2013, 01:06 AM
I think that if you bought either the Hornady kit of the RCBS kit you would be just fine and have most of what you needed. Not sure why someone is knocking the Speer book, I really like the two I have.

The problem with this kind of questioning on a forum is that you will get a lot of opinion and you know what they say about opinions and back sides, every one has one and not to many of them don't stink to some degree or another. Including my own.

I have not found any thing in either the RCBS or Hornady kit I think is absolutely trash, it all has a life time warranty except for the book and quite possibly the digital scale in the Hornady kit. Which means if you have a problem with it, they will take care of it quickly. Often times just sending you what you need, no matter who's fault it is.

I have bought some Lee stuff, but I have given most of it away or traded it away. Their stuff is economical and does work, but I just don't think it feels as well built or performs as well as some of the other brands. For example their Perfect powder measure, it works, but it leaks powder, really bad. It also has a lot of flex in it making it feel cheap and flimsy. But it did work. I don't think to many people will disagree with my assessment of this as it is a common view of this particular piece of equipment.

I also agree that all of them make some stuff better than the others depending on what you have and what your needs are. I have a Uniflow measure on my Hornady Pro-Jector progressive and a Hornady measure in my RCBS stand on the bench for using with my Rock Chuker. I have Hornady dies and RCBS dies, for the most part I like the Hornady dies a little better because of the over all package, but I think the RCBS dies I have are just as well made.

I think the best thing you can do for yourself is to go to a shop or box store that has some presses set up and look them over and and see how they feel. Pull a few things out of the box and see how they rate compared to each other.

Over all I like the idea of the kit from RCBS or Hornady. The stuff is more than adequate and capable of lasting several life times. While the Lee press will likely last just as long any any other press, I don't feel the same about much of their other equipment I have bought.

Lost Sheep
May 14, 2013, 01:43 AM
Thanks for the wonderful advice. Lost sheep, your post is so awesome it needs to be captured somewhere. Thnk you for your intellect and time.

I read the ABSs back in January, and reviewed in depth in early April. I now have five reloading books on the kindle, and the newest Lyman guide on the bedside table.

Initially I will be reloading 25-06. I hope to eventually reload 7.62x54 and for my snake gun, long colt.

I hit the range twice a month, probably 150 - 200 rounds a day. Thanks again for all the replies.
Bolt action for the 25-06 I presume. For that, I would get a single-stage press. Almost every loading I know has a single stage, no matter what else they have. You can't really go wrong learning on a single stage.

Personally, for the quantities you quote, an auto-advancing turret would not be a bad way to go, either. Use as a single stage for batch processing and with the auto-advancing turned on for continuous/sequential processing.

Again, good luck.

Lost Sheep

Potatohead
May 14, 2013, 12:56 PM
good info here folks. thx

If you enjoyed reading about "Reloading kit vs. ala cart" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!