Wood glue comparison test


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Bull Nutria
May 10, 2013, 08:34 AM
for cracked wooden firearm stocks and forend repairs check this out, very interesting. I have a hunting buddy that is a custom cabinet maker he uses that Tite Bond III, now i know why!!



http://www.oldbrownglue.com/pdf/HowStrongisYourGlue_FWW.pdf

Bull

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Blue68f100
May 10, 2013, 03:09 PM
I wished they would have tested the joint in a different configuration. Most repairs are not done with the joints the tested with. A Lap joint would have been a better test.

Sam1911
May 10, 2013, 03:13 PM
That's a classic Fine Woodworking article. Very eye-opening, but yes it would be grand if they'd do other types of joints. Don't think the results would change much, but at least we'd know.

rcmodel
May 10, 2013, 03:24 PM
Gorilla Glue surprised me.

I used it to glue a flat rock on edge to another rock (kind like a sun dial) in the flower garden 7 years ago. It sets outside year around.

And it's still glued.


Also used it to patch a leak in a water garden plastic molded stream bed 3 years ago.
And it's still not leaking again.

rc

DM~
May 11, 2013, 10:18 AM
I've repaired a HUGE pile of stocks over the years, and i've mostly used Systems West Epoxy (SWE) and Accraglas...

Back in the 70's, i was makeing "laminated" stock blanks useing the SWE and selling them, i never had one come back, or a complaint of any kind with even one of them...

I sent quite a few to Fagen for semi inletting, and they had no complaints from them either...

In my cabinet shop, i used a LOT of yellow glue in furniture makeing... The only returns i ever had was a couple cutting boards that folks soaked for a LONG time in hot water.

The glued up meat cutting boards i make now, i use Titebone 3. So far, no one is complaining.

DM

beag_nut
May 13, 2013, 05:41 PM
Actually, it's West Systems Epoxy, not the reverse.
Regardless, there is more influence on the joint by the time between the wood was cut, and when it was glued, than anything else. The industry standard is 16 hours. That is, cut the pieces, then glue them together before about sixteen hours. That length of time refers to the time for the wood surface to oxidize. If it oxidizes enough, it becomes a "passive" surface, which does not adhere well to anything else. If the glueing happens before the surface oxidizes ( and is thus an "active" surface), the surface will readily form a chemical bond with the glue. Chemical bonds are very good. If one waits too long, all that's left is a mechanical bond, which is MUCH less desirable. But if one is left only with the option of a mechanical bond, then go for the gusto: epoxies, which are the kings in mechanical bonding. I went to school for this, by the way.

orionengnr
May 14, 2013, 09:42 PM
Thank you for providing the link to that article.

Good read, and it allowed me to check my "what I learned today" box. :)
My father was a pretty good carpenter/cabinetmaker in his day, but that day was a while ago.
I am a barely-adequate carpenter and no kind of cabinetmaker at all, but it's good to know that the Elmer's he swore by 50 years ago (and that I've used ever since) can still hold its own.

1SOW
May 17, 2013, 01:07 AM
I do woodwork, some furniture, tables chairs, etc. as a hobby. I have a house-full of red oak, assorted clear pines, walnut, and some poplar done over 30 years with Titebond I, II and III.

It can depend on the "type" of wood, but generally Titebond is excellent. It is not a good "filler". Titebond II is water resistant. Titebond III is waterproof. If the glue shows it won't take oil or other semi-transparent stains the same as the wood, so a super-thin glue joint will show as a microf-ine line..
With Titebond less is better. You want just enough glue to get the full joint covered after applying pressure. If the two pieces don't mate perfectly, strength will be less.

For a crack--no. For a joint--yes.

It is extremely strong and durable if the surfaces mate perfectly, even end grain to end grain. The joint will be the strongest part of the piece if done correctly.

The Titebond web-site gives more info and actual data on application, uses and strengths.



Gorilla Glue surprised me. Polyurethane Glue: The perfect glue for wet/damp areas and exposed to the el;ements. and where some filler is needed. It expands as it cures. I made a 32" water wheel using polyurethane glue in our backyard pond.

rcmodel
May 17, 2013, 01:20 AM
The perfect glue for wet/damp areasThat was my conclusion too.

I can't even imagine using it for fine woodworking or gun repair.

When you put a little in, you get a whole lot more then you expected back out!!

But it does seem exceptionally durable outside in the weather year round.

rc

Sam1911
May 17, 2013, 07:31 AM
Polyurethane Glue: The perfect glue for wet/damp areas and exposed to the el;ements. and where some filler is needed. It expands as it cures.
Just remember that it is only a fraction as strong in any joint or repair as almost any of the other choices.

If I needed to build a "fusible link" into something (where that joint would break or tear away first to protect other parts) I'd use polyurethane glue. Otherwise, no.

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