Winchester 1886 or Pedersoli 1886/71


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AethelstanAegen
May 11, 2013, 06:38 AM
I'm thinking about buying myself a Winchester 1886. I've been considering one of the new production Winchester 1886 Light Weights or the Pedersoli 1886/71. I was purely thinking of a real Winchester but I'm not a fan of the rebounding hammer and the other numerous lawyer added parts. I know the Pedersoli doesn't have a rebounding hammer or tang safety which I like. Does anyone have any experience with the Pedersoli? Any major ways the Pedersoli diverges from the original 1886 as JMB designed it?

TL;DR: A Winchester 1886 Light Weight or the Pedersoli 1886/71? Thoughts, comments, experience with either?

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Onmilo
May 11, 2013, 12:20 PM
I own a Winchester.Miroku Extra Lightweight rifle and a couple Pedersoli Sharps.
Both Companies produce excellent firearms with very good quality barrels.
Pedersoli is one of the few Italian gunmakers that knows how to properly harden steel and temper springs too.
The Japanese, just as good, maybe a bit better actually.

If you are wanting a more traditional style 86 lever action, I can find no faults with the Perdersoli and the only "Issue" I could possibly see is the guns are built to the Metric system of standards as are the Japanese rifles.
Have fun making your choice

StrawHat
May 11, 2013, 01:15 PM
If you are wanting to buy an "authentic" Winchester, you will be looking for something made prior to 1932. Any Model 1886 made since then is a replica whether it is stamped Winchester, Pedersoli, Miroku or Uberti.

That being said, lots of fellows like the Italian offerings.

loose noose
May 11, 2013, 01:34 PM
I can't handle the rebounding hammer or especially the tang safety, I would definitely go with the Pedersoli. Incidentally I have a early 1900 Winchester 1886, and a 1873 Winchester made I believe in 1891, I'd have to check that. Unfortunately both have been restored to like new condition.;)

AethelstanAegen
May 11, 2013, 03:04 PM
If you are wanting to buy an "authentic" Winchester, you will be looking for something made prior to 1932.

I'd love to pick up an authentic Winchester but they generally seem to be out of my budget. I may also be frequently shooting BP reloads in the rifle and so I thought it might be better to use new production rather than subject an antique to the nasty BP residue.

eastbank
May 11, 2013, 05:09 PM
i,m not sure if browning had a 1886 made,but my 1895 browning in 30-40 krag made in the 80,s does not have the safety or rebounding hammer. you may want to check to make sure. eastbank.

Malamute
May 11, 2013, 05:20 PM
Yes, Browning made 1886's, and I'd choose one over any of the other choices besides an original. They are around on the used market, often for very decent prices. I can't imagine buying an italian gun if a Winchester, or especially a Browning is available. The Miroku/Winchesters can be changed to regular half cock hammer systems with a little investment in time and money, or you can have it done. I just prefer the Brownings. Nothing needs to be done other than a decent receiver sight and sling mounts.

Whats this about black powder residue being nasty? I used black in my old original 86, it was never hard to clean well, and never suffered in the least from its use. They dont get much fouling in the action in any event, and the barrels are simple to clean with hot tap water, with the action upside down over a rag.

AethelstanAegen
May 11, 2013, 07:36 PM
Whats this about black powder residue being nasty? I used black in my old original 86, it was never hard to clean well, and never suffered in the least from its use. They dont get much fouling in the action in any event, and the barrels are simple to clean with hot tap water, with the action upside down over a rag.

I don't have any other lever guns so I didn't know how hard the mechanism would be to clean. I do run BP sometimes in my Winchester 1897 from 1899 but I had a pretty good idea how to clean that. If it's not that hard to clean the 1886, I can keep my eyes out for a cheaply priced original as well. Thanks for the info!

I don't think Browning did anything like the extralights though. I'm not really looking for the full sized 1886 but rather the extra lights. The Pedersoli gets pretty closed to how Teddy Roosevelt ordered his 1886, so I find that rather appealing too.

Malamute
May 11, 2013, 10:09 PM
It really didnt get much fouling in the action, the case sealed it quite well. When I did clean the action, it was just with a toothbrush with a little solvent, then wiped with a rag and/or a clean toothbrush. I used plain hot tap water,and even kept the patches to reuse after hand washing them with dish soap for the dirtiest ones. I just laid them out to dry and saved them for the next time. The ones that ended up getting dirtiest I tossed over time and rotated the next cleanest ones to first passes thru the barrel. It truly was simpler than many modern guns with jacket fouling. The bore cleaned up very easily with hot wet patches. Bullets were Lyman 400's (457193 I believe)cast from wheel weights, lubed with the old Lyman Alox lube. Same for the Colt SAA in 44 spl, very simple to care for with black loads. 44 spl cases dont seal as well as 45-70's, but it still wasn't difficult to keep up.

It brings back memories, it was probably some of the most fun shooting I've ever done. The 86 was a heavy barrel 40 that had been rebored to 45-70, and been rebuilt with extra fancy grade wood and reblued very well. It looked like a new gun. The Colt was a late 4 3/4" nickel. I drug those guns all over N Az back in the day on my motorcycle. :D

Oh, Noah Zark posted on leverguns, he recently found a Browning 86 carbine in excellent condition for $800.

I understand about wanting a certain style. I've modified the Brownings I have. Chopped barrels, changed stocks, added decent sights and slings.

The late Winchesters can be swapped with Browning hammer and trigger to remove the rebound, and the tang safety removed. A tang sight covers the hole, or it can be professioanlly filled and refinished. Some have original type markings put on them when thats done also, on the tang and barrel.

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