Inspecting the Bore of a Brand New Gun?


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Bruno2
May 13, 2013, 05:05 PM
Does anybody do it before taking a new out of the box gun to the range? I always do. I might be paranoid , but it never hurts to check if it is obstructed. I take a closer look at my bolt guns just to see if there are funny looking spots in the rifling.

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herrwalther
May 13, 2013, 07:23 PM
I must be paranoid too. When I am packing for a trip to the range, I take the weapon out of my RSC and give it a once over with a flashlight. This does two things, it checks how well I cleaned the firearm last time and for safety for bore obstructions or anything else to be concerned with.

45_auto
May 13, 2013, 07:31 PM
I never have. Never even crossed my mind.

However, I also don't look up the tailpipe of a new car before I start it, so that may have something to do with it.

Neo-Luddite
May 13, 2013, 07:43 PM
I've always inspected and swabbed the bore on a first trip to shoot with a new gun. My feeling is, you never know...could have obvious manufacturing problems or (more likely) some grease or packing material.

brboyer
May 13, 2013, 07:43 PM
Detail strip, clean and lube before firing. Not doing so could be hazardous to your health. :scrutiny:

rcmodel
May 13, 2013, 07:48 PM
Does anybody do it before taking a new out of the box gun to the range? but it never hurts to check if it is obstructed.Not so much inspect them, as clean them.

New guns are shipped with either preservative oil or grease in the bore.
Or come un-cleaned for the factory test firing.

I would not dream of going to shoot one without cleaning it and properly lubricating it with proper oil first.

rc

GBExpat
May 13, 2013, 08:09 PM
Detail strip, clean and lube before firing.
I do this with all new-to-me (whether factory new or not) firearms prior to firing them. Used or milsurp firearms receive a closer inspection.

mljdeckard
May 13, 2013, 08:09 PM
Exactly what RC said. Run a few patches through the bore, get out whatever grease they shipped it with.

Hypnogator
May 13, 2013, 08:56 PM
So is running a dry swab through the bore to get rid of any factory gunk.;)

russ69
May 13, 2013, 09:13 PM
Detail strip, clean and lube before firing. Not doing so could be hazardous to your health. :scrutiny:
Always clean a new gun. Then the bore gets "dry patched" before the gun is shot.

Bruno2
May 13, 2013, 09:26 PM
I have heard from some people that they oil a new bore before shooting. I haven't bought a new gun in so long that I cant remember if I have always done that or not. Seems like I did when I got the 22-250.

After a range or hunting trip I always clean the bore and oil it. So after the first range trip of a new gun it gets the bore oiled for sure.

I don't know why other than just paranoia of something finding its way into a new bbl. I am about 99.99% sure nothing finds its way in there while I am in possession of it, but its just a crap shoot before then. SO better safe than sorry.

Walkalong
May 13, 2013, 09:37 PM
Anyone who doesn't at least check the bore of a new to them gun for possible obstructions before shooting it is taking a chance. Perhaps not a big chance, but a chance none the less, and the possible consequences can be really bad, so why risk it.

A buddy from work bought a brand new .30-06 and split the barrel from the muzzle half way back on the first shot. Scared him pretty badly.

Akita1
May 13, 2013, 09:38 PM
I actually disassemble every new one I get before I go to the range. I tell myself it's for inspection/familiarity, to "clean" it myself and to teach myself how to put it back together, but mostly it's because it's new/cool and I can't help but look at how it's made & all fits together!

Bruno2
May 13, 2013, 09:43 PM
but mostly it's because it's new/cool and I can't help but look at how it's made & all fits together!


Nothing worse than being in possession of a new gun you have been drooling over and not be able to shoot it for a while. That makes me get them out and start field stripping and piddling with them.

Akita1
May 13, 2013, 09:53 PM
Nothing worse than being in possession of a new gun you have been drooling over and not be able to shoot it for a while. That makes me get them out and start field stripping and piddling with them.
Agreed; drives me nuts. It was like that with fishing rods when I was a kid, but luckily I lived near a lake and a river so as long as it was summer I was good to go. Sadly, travel schedule for work precludes such ease of use for my guns!

splithoof
May 13, 2013, 10:02 PM
The way that mass produced (or packaged) items are treated these days leaves a lot to be desired. I always have inspected any new firearm using a bore-light before accepting it, and always pull the bolt from any rifle (or use a mirror) before firing it when training. I once found a plug of styrofoam in the bore of a brand new rifle; if it had been fired, the result could have been very bad. When reloading my sidearm I like to shine a light from the breach end onto the floor before leaving the nest.

Bill4282
May 14, 2013, 11:13 AM
Always BEFORE buying with a bore light. Check the muzzle crown and the breech for damage. Both can get boogered at the factory, distributor or retailer. If you find it after the sale, big hassle to get fixed. If used when bought, your problem. I also like to check the barrel for pitting and rust. If dirty, mostly I'll pass since the previous owner didn't even care to clean before selling.

Newcatwalt
May 14, 2013, 12:14 PM
I field strip and clean every new gun I purchase whether it's factory new or just new to me. After shooting and cleaning it a few times I will normally detail strip and clean it. I can't help it - I have an insatiable curiosity when it comes to firearms and how they're put together and function. This drives my buddies crazy who once read somewhere that a person shouldn't clean their guns unless it's absolutely necessary because it will affect accuracy. Personally I think that's total nonsense when it comes to a self defense firearm.

brickeyee
May 14, 2013, 02:30 PM
Storage grease is NOT a lubricant for operation.

snakeman
May 14, 2013, 03:00 PM
I look closely at the bore of every firearm I purchase, new or used. I've seen new revolvers with gouges in the bore and rifles with rust pitting.

esheato
May 14, 2013, 03:11 PM
Regardless, I do a visual just to ensure there are no obstructions.

Most of the time, I try to run a patch and get the preservative out. It really depends on the purpose of the gun. Precision rifle? Yes. Plinker? Nah, just pour some lube on the action and run it.

Boonieguy
May 14, 2013, 03:19 PM
A guy I work with bought one of those brass framed, U.S.A made lever guns in .22 mag , I would . He decided to shoot a few rounds in his little basement range and at 20' it was key holing . Upon closer inspection he found it had never been rifled . He ended up sending it back for replacement .
Strange deal that was .
Brian

sansone
May 14, 2013, 03:36 PM
for the last 5-10 years I've been running a patch with solvent, then looking down the bores of new guns.. sometimes it's like some weird peep show :p
but seriously, an AR brrl once had a big burr at the drilled gas port

okiewita40
May 14, 2013, 05:54 PM
I always inspect the bore of any firearm at the store be it new or used. In 2005 when I went to the Police academy. The Range Master had bought a brand new Ruger semi-auto. Unboxed it, loaded it up and couldn't hit a thing with it.

After unloading it and making the weapon safe he tore it down. Upon inspection only one half of the barrel was rifled length wise. Got taught a lesson that day is to inspect every firearm thoroughly before you attempt to use it or buy it.

RBid
May 14, 2013, 06:00 PM
I'm right there with other people saying that they field strip, clean, and lubricate every new-to-me firearm before firing it. I like to get to know my firearms. I play a little Marvin Gaye, and whisper sweet nothings to them during the field strip.

Pretty standard stuff, right?

12many
May 14, 2013, 07:03 PM
yes. I often check it before use even if not new or when cleaning it. ALso check it when I buy it before leaving shop if possible, such as with a bolt action.

Bruno2
May 14, 2013, 07:18 PM
Always BEFORE buying with a bore light. Check the muzzle crown and the breech for damage. Both can get boogered at the factory, distributor or retailer. If you find it after the sale, big hassle to get fixed. If used when bought, your problem. I also like to check the barrel for pitting and rust. If dirty, mostly I'll pass since the previous owner didn't even care to clean before selling.

Bill I agree, I really have to know the previous owner of a gun like a bolt action rifle before I will buy it used. Not too many people know the damage that leaving a bore dirty after a range trip causes. The possibility of throat erosion or letting a bbl get too hot when shooting is another issue as well. I would rather buy one new if I don't know the type of gun owner a used rifle is coming from.

This drives my buddies crazy who once read somewhere that a person shouldn't clean their guns unless it's absolutely necessary because it will affect accuracy. Personally I think that's total nonsense when it comes to a self defense firearm.


A rifle bore will copper foul after about 15 rnds and to maintain accuracy it needs to be brushed before firing another 15. The accuracy will drop off if you don't do this. It is very obvious when shooting that a bbl is fouling when it quits grouping as well as it did.

MutinousDoug
May 14, 2013, 10:56 PM
About 12 years ago a friend and I decided to get into NRA High Power so we bought AR lower receivers and parts, assembled uppers and went to town. As a matter of course he pushed a patch through the bore and it hung up. After some work, he got it through, torn almost in half.
An inspection of the bore revealed a curl of steel in the bore from the gas port drill. A return to the manufacturer corrected the issue.
I wonder how much that curl would have damaged the bore should he have put a round down the bore and never known? Obviously the mfgr didn't bother test firing the upper.
A quick bore inspection is cheap insurance.

Hokkmike
May 15, 2013, 07:15 AM
Add me to the inspect and clean crowd. Never know what oil lurks therein.

GBExpat
May 15, 2013, 07:53 AM
A rifle bore will copper foul after about 15 rnds and to maintain accuracy it needs to be brushed before firing another 15. The accuracy will drop off if you don't do this.With the exception of a very small percentage of shooters/shooting-type, what you have described is far beyond what I would consider to be "overzealous" for every single one of the many firearms that I own.

Also, keep in mind that while cleaning too little can effect accuracy, so can cleaning too much. ;)

pockets
May 15, 2013, 08:03 AM
What RC said in post #6.

A 'brand-spanking-new' or a 'used-but-new-to-me' gun gets cleaned & lubed before shooting.
.

AlexanderA
May 15, 2013, 09:14 AM
Inspecting the bore of a new gun should be a no-brainer. Manufacturers often put a rust-inhibiting wick (cardboard tube) in there, or leave lots of grease. If you shot the gun with the wick still inside, it would be like a barrel obstruction and could blow up the gun!

COgunner
May 15, 2013, 11:15 AM
I did on a brand new, name-brand pistol and discovered NO RIFLING in the bore. Probably wouldn't have shot very well.:eek:

LeonCarr
May 15, 2013, 11:25 AM
A buddy bought a brand new Remington 700 BDL .270 that would not chamber factory ammo, like they had used a roughing reamer and forgot the finish reamer or polishing :).

Sent it to the factory, brand new barrel, free of charge.

Yes, I inspect new ones :).

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

WoodchuckAssassin
May 15, 2013, 11:36 AM
You're not paranoid if their really out to get you. Haha! I do the same thing. Heck, I do a complete takedown before I use it at the range. Something else I take careful note of is the condition of the barrel crown. A gun can still preform if the bore is a little fuddled up, but if the muzzel is damaged in any way, you're looking at a costly repair.

x_wrench
May 15, 2013, 09:32 PM
after the purchase of my last new rifle, i will be taking a bore light, and an eye loupe with me when i pick out another one. be it pistol or rifle. the rifle was a Marlin 1895g 45-70. the bore in that thing was so rough, it would shred cleaning patches!

tactikel
May 15, 2013, 10:57 PM
I disassemble, clean and lube every firearm I acquire. My Mossberg 835 yielded 4 patches full of some brown rust inhibitor! After a good cleaning it patterns great.

Old Dog Man
May 16, 2013, 12:15 AM
I always check them wheather mine or a customers when, I was smithing I found several that the rifling saw not hammer forged all the way back to the freebore evenly. Never found a button rifled barrel that way or a pistol. Al

Deus Machina
May 16, 2013, 01:24 AM
I always check everything new. Want to catch any defects, uncleaned shavings, or overzealous greasing before I shoot anything.

For instance, a friend bought a Mosin Nagant that, aside from a few bubbles, was packed almost muzzle to chamber with old half-gummed grease. Just enough you couldn't see it without looking straight in, the outside was most free of cosmoline, and a round would have chambered perfectly fine. The first shot would not have been fun.

Bruno2
May 16, 2013, 01:28 AM
I never have. Never even crossed my mind.

However, I also don't look up the tailpipe of a new car before I start it, so that may have something to do with it.

I hope this guy has been reading the thread.

pintler
May 16, 2013, 06:16 AM
I found a 4 or 5 inch 'tail' from a plastic zip tie halfway down the bore of a brand new 223 once.

Pulling a patch through doesn't take much time.

Scooter22
May 16, 2013, 02:49 PM
I do since the 80s. I bought brand new a Win 94AE from a dealer. Got it home and was giving it the once over and found one of the grooves in the barrel looked like a RR track. Dealer didn't want to know nothin so I had to send it back to the factory. Needles to say I was really PO'd.:cuss:

deputy tom
May 16, 2013, 06:34 PM
I agree with pockets' post #31. tom. :cool:

22-rimfire
May 16, 2013, 09:03 PM
I usually check the bore as part of my inspection of any gun I am interested in buying.

I have to chuckle... I am mostly a DA revolver person. I was buying a single action and I checked to make sure it was unloaded and proceeded to try to sight down the bore. Looked like I was trying to shoot myself. I laughed when I realized I couldn't "see" anything anyway that way without removing the cylinder.

I don't field strip new guns. I do run a patch down the barrel before shooting the first time.

Krandock
May 16, 2013, 09:27 PM
Storage grease is NOT a lubricant for operation.
I have been selling firearms for about 15 years. This statement is very true. Some manufactures recommend cleaning the firearm before firing.

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