Life Below Zero


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Dr T
May 23, 2013, 11:38 AM
One of our board members--and a tremendous resource on Mosin-Nagant M39 information (and Artic hunting) is in a reality show Life Below Zero. Since it is on the National Geographic channel, I expect that it will be well done.

The rerun of S01/E01 is on tonight. I look forward to seeing him.

Literally.

If you enjoyed reading about "Life Below Zero" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
SilentStalker
May 23, 2013, 01:33 PM
Nice. Who is it?

wankerjake
May 23, 2013, 01:46 PM
Caribou?

Cosmoline
May 23, 2013, 02:21 PM
Must be Caribou! For once I'll be interested in seeing one of these Alaska reality shows. But the clip seems to show someone with a modern Marlin levergun, suspiciously looking like a WWG custom. I wonder if Ken has infiltrated the production.

RustHunter87
May 23, 2013, 02:29 PM
its Caribou alright
http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=8936269&postcount=23

CoRoMo
May 23, 2013, 03:49 PM
And his gun collection is outstanding!!

THR member Caribou: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/exposure/content/photo/photo/1078177_chip-and-his-dog_u4otpkuoohegc34cxym6cgqbe3ncurxrbvj6lwuht2ya6mzmafma_380x285.jpg

Congrats Caribou!!!

Here's some snips...
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/videos/life-with-the-hailstones/

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/life-below-zero/videos/waiting-to-freeze/

Sometimes I wish I had cable or satellite TV. For years now I've been sharing his posts/threads from here and gunboards.com with family members of mine who fancy themselves as "hunters". Caribou defines 'hunter'!

caribou
May 23, 2013, 08:05 PM
Yes, that is "me" and "us" :D

We were actually impressed with the productions end, and its amusing to see that it took 10 days of filming to get us on for 15 minutes.
Some things are a bit jumbled, but what really made it shine was that , as the 'local' and subject of the filming, we had ALOT of control on content and we even narrated our own, rather than some grovlly voiced narrator. As well, we just flay refused to make any 'drama' and the only such of that kind is me a bit fruterated that me and the wife couldn't hook our net weight (it slipped the line, we never got it back) and that was about one sentence worth, so it got repeated. ~~LOL!!~~
basicly youll see us as we are, though its just short bursts and they had to leave out a lot due continuity and the fact that hunting with extra guys in tow is very diffacult.

Still, it s on Snundays, we have 16 episodes and starting inna week or two, well have 6 more down.
I hope you like it.

okiewita40
May 23, 2013, 08:34 PM
Congrats to you. I really like the scenery. Have read a lot of your posts. It is good to know that the old ways still exist in some areas. Best of luck to you and your family.

Dentite
May 23, 2013, 11:29 PM
That is cool...I've always enjoyed your posts and I love that you use an M39. I have two '44 Sako M39s and they are sweet.

CoRoMo
May 24, 2013, 10:21 AM
Kill some food with one of your 'weapons of war'! :evil:

Seriously though, do it. It'll go lengths toward illustrating that so-called 'assault weapons' have more purpose than the media gives them.

SilentStalker
May 24, 2013, 02:01 PM
Crap! I missed it last night. Any chance they will be re-airing this or maybe putting it online somewhere?

gamestalker
May 24, 2013, 02:05 PM
I watched it. Really good show! I'm going to follow it closely, Alaska is hands down my favorite state, as is that particular life style.

GS

gspn
May 25, 2013, 07:09 PM
And his gun collection is outstanding!!

THR member Caribou: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/exposure/content/photo/photo/1078177_chip-and-his-dog_u4otpkuoohegc34cxym6cgqbe3ncurxrbvj6lwuht2ya6mzmafma_380x285.jpg


Holy mackeral...that dog looks like he could put a whoopin on a grizzly...for fun.

caribou
May 27, 2013, 12:28 AM
So how much did ya like the second episode?

It was just us at "Freeze up", but I wish they had shown the artwork, sewing and tanning we do at that timma year, maybe next episode :D

xxjumbojimboxx
May 27, 2013, 04:01 AM
I like it caribou, I'm jealous of your lifestyle.

Bull Nutria
May 28, 2013, 12:59 PM
Caribou,

I like it too, i wish it was more about you and your family and less about Sue and the other 2 guys. so how long can you keep caribou meat rolled up in his own hide like you did? your wife can really handle that skinning knife looks like it is sharp as a razor.

Bull

Dr T
May 28, 2013, 04:55 PM
Missed it last night, but I did discover that Comcast has in their free "On Demand"--with no commercials. It is under TV Shows.

caribou
May 28, 2013, 11:35 PM
We hunt at the "freeze up" just before the Bulls go into Rut, all Prime meats.

So the carcass actually began to freeze the day we caught the bull, as we wait until ice forms along the rivers edge and make a large catch.

This year I caught 14 with archery and 26 with a lance. That's how we started winter after a terrible rainy flood summer that ruined fishing and drying fish. Food security at the start of Winter is important, as well as healthy and lets us work through the Dark Winter of the Arctic, till Light Winter arrives

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=679549



Both episodes of the show can be found on youtube now, I see.....

Agsalaska
May 28, 2013, 11:54 PM
Must be Caribou! For once I'll be interested in seeing one of these Alaska reality shows. But the clip seems to show someone with a modern Marlin levergun, suspiciously looking like a WWG custom. I wonder if Ken has infiltrated the production.
Ha. I know Ken.

lloveless
May 29, 2013, 06:49 AM
Thank you Caribou and your family for sharing with the rest of the world your life style. It would do people well to realize you are living a life similar to what our forefathers lived. (different weapons now, and gas engines, planes). I lived in Kotz for 3 months in 2010 and 4 months in Barrow this year. I really appreciate the culture of the Inupiat people.
LL

DM~
May 29, 2013, 10:41 AM
Over the 25 years i lived in Alaska, i spent more time Ft Yukon, Artic Village way, although i have spent time in and hunted the Brooks range and the Nowitna river too.

I was surprised to see that registered guide shoot a caribou with the pipeline in the back ground. (surprised that they showed it) Last i checked it wasn't legal to shoot a caribou within 5 miles of the pipe line. I will say, from what i've seen, no one who lives up north worried too much about regs, they just hunt, shoot and kill what ever they want, any time they want, spring fall or when ever! I've even seen natives jump shooting ducks right off their nest and takeing all the eggs.

I did enjoy the show, because i've also spent quite a bit of time up there so it looks fimilar... Looks like you have a great family!

DM

caribou
May 29, 2013, 10:34 PM
Ya, were a bit amazed at the pipeline in the background, but I guess he didn't do any damage.

Shooting Ducks and gathering eggs, that's what were doing now :D I prefer Seagull eggs, as I don't eat the seagull, but if I kill a parent duck off a nest, the eggs get eaten too.
You gotta understand, we don't have 90% of our birds for 9 months of the year and eggs at a store are 20$ a dozen, and seagull eggs are yummy, and no different in flavor than a chickens and twice as big. Well get a couple hundred (3 in a clutch) and we gather for 3-4 days, and yet the birds lay more eggs and still raise their young.
We boil the eggs and picle them, or oil them and peel back the moss from the permafrost and save them chilled, until Sept and we take them home and save them inna cool place. Between 7 of us, thay don't get far into winter befor were done :D

Grassman
May 30, 2013, 07:25 PM
This looks really cool, hopefully no "Sons of Guns" bullcrap subplots, just real life in Alaska I hope, I will definitely check this out.

Dentite
June 4, 2013, 01:47 AM
Chip,

I love seeing that M39 used for hunting. I have a pair of Sako '44 barreled M39s that I love. One old warhorse and one that's pretty nice.

One question for you. What is the point of that woman "Sue" living where she does? Is it some sort of camp? Is she paid by a company/government to stay there during the winter? That's the one part of the show I tend to want to fast forward.

Thanks.

scaatylobo
June 4, 2013, 08:06 AM
I hear you as to the segment about that woman - she is not a pleasant person IMNSHO.

And she seems full of herself to a fault.

But the show is amazing and I admire those hearty enough to be THAT far from medical care ,makes you get a real grasp of how easy we have it in the lower states.

I would really love to spend about a month up there and see how tough I really am [ at my age,not more than that amount of time,I aint that stupid/stubborn ].

Good to see y'all actually miss on game shots - THAT is the real world.

I will be watching,like seeing what you use for all tools as they mush be hearty.

Cosmoline
June 4, 2013, 06:06 PM
http://www.kavikrivercamp.com/

It's a camp near ANWR for lodging en route in and out, supply dumps, etc. I don't think it's connected to the feds. There are all sorts of people living out there in the bush.

Werndl
June 4, 2013, 08:52 PM
Really appreciate your candor and willingness to give us all a glimpse into your lives. Excellent to see there's still some people out there "doing it right". I agree with the other posters about that self promoting, drama type, sue. Could do with a little less of that. Not that Im saying Id wanna try or do what she does.

All in all, great show! Thanks to you and yours!!

wally
June 4, 2013, 09:06 PM
I thought it strange that when hunting is your livelihood that she'd take two shots totally unsupported -- classic one knee, or using the snow machine as a support would have been way better. Or did you want some early misses to make the rest of the hunting seem more dramatic?

coloradokevin
June 4, 2013, 09:15 PM
Just saw this thread... Congrats on the show, Caribou! I've always enjoyed your posts around the hunting section, and figure you to be one of the most accomplished hunters this site has ever seen. It's inspiring to see people still making a living off of the land as you and your family does!

justice06rr
June 4, 2013, 10:18 PM
I haven't seen the episodes but hope to catch up. Seems like a very interesting show.

Wish I could visit and hunt in Alaska sometime in the future. You guys are living the life!!!

tnelson31
June 4, 2013, 10:39 PM
The clips were nice, thanks!

hang fire
June 5, 2013, 11:48 AM
Really appreciate your candor and willingness to give us all a glimpse into your lives. Excellent to see there's still some people out there "doing it right". I agree with the other posters about that self promoting, drama type, sue. Could do with a little less of that. Not that Im saying Id wanna try or do what she does.

All in all, great show! Thanks to you and yours!!
Sue is from Chicago, think she went mucho pro-gun after getting mugged and chewed up by a grizzly bear.

Dr T
June 5, 2013, 03:42 PM
Just to note that what may appear to be self-promotion may be created in part by the editor and producer. The lady is strong willed, independent, and willing to eschew a number of creature comforts to live life as she sees fit. I would suspect that she was asked to talk frankly about her life and her choices and she has done so with candor. You must listen carefully to what she is saying.

If I had been chewed up by a grizzly, I would tend to be quite cautious. In fact, I think I would be more comfortable in an APC than just having the 44 and 45-70 near at had.

scaatylobo
June 5, 2013, 04:00 PM
She is sleeping in a food wrap [ according to the bear ].

So at the very least,how about a STURDY wood structure to sleep in so as to have time to react to a bear THAT big trying to eat you.

The very least I would do is in better weather,build a 'strong/safe' room to sleep in .

But if I was going to rely on immediate action drill ,it sure as hell would not be getting out of bed and then beaing able to reach a rifle.

How about S&W 500 magnum or a 454 Casull by the bed,as that might be the only and last thing you do before becoming dinner.

She still seems to have a very unpleasant personality,and having met people such as her - its no wonder she is alone there.

I too pondered the wisdom of taking a kneeling shot at what appears to be a REAL distance,when there were options.

Dr T
June 5, 2013, 04:09 PM
On construction in the Alaskan bush: You certainly build a study wood structure. The problem is that you would have to have Home Depot mail the materials to you board by board. I have been wondering how the containers that comprise most of her structures were carried to the location. It was probably piecemeal and assembled on site. In that part of the world, almost everything moves by air and there is a shortage of casual labor.. I have been a guest at a log cabin in the bush that builder had to airlift in log by log...

As for the 454 or 500: 44 Magnum ammo is plentiful and cheap by comparison...

scaatylobo
June 5, 2013, 10:33 PM
Well,they got ALL those containers there,and IF they NEED a guard to protect them = then they NEED to get a few 2 X 6's to make a hardened box to sleep in.

I was not inferring they actually build a whole cabin for her.

And since she has that many guns,I would be very surprised if she could not find a box or 2 of preferred high end ammo..

But yes to the .44 magnum if that is all you can muster.

I would go with a 'box' to sleep in that was at least a 'bit' more bear proof than the sandwich wrapper she is in now .

And then a 12 bore [ as short as legal/think PDW or SBR ] to sleep next to,and a handgun as a last resort.

The idea of taking on a bruin of that size with a pistol [ any pistol ] don't make me sleep well.

hang fire
June 6, 2013, 01:49 AM
The thing that has puzzled me is the people living alone in isolated conditions, appear not to have back up plan for a what if?

What if their living quarters burnt down to ground? I have seen no caches with the necessaries for sustaining life at 40 below. I lived in AK for seven years and got to see where some people lived year round in remote cabins. Many of them, but not all, had taken steps to survive if they lost their main dwelling. In case of fire and placed at a safe distance from said main dwelling. A elevated bear & vole ( destructive little rodents) proof cache with tent, sleeping bags, appropriate clothing, firearms and ammunition, food, small wood burning sheep herder type stoves, (for tent) two way radio with batteries and other essentials.

Archaic
June 6, 2013, 01:57 AM
I think more likely she's jut a cantankerous odd duck that probably does not care what we think cuz she could whip most of us.

Somebody needs to keep this topped, good stuff here.

Tim the student
June 6, 2013, 02:08 AM
Just watched the first one - pretty cool show.

Was surprised by the guy taking a caribou with a .223 - I would have thought he would have gone with something bigger. The one he killed did look pretty small though.

Caribou - I don't want your life, but I do want to experience a month or so of it!

Cosmoline
June 6, 2013, 02:08 AM
There are a lot of folks like that around this state ;-)

DM~
June 6, 2013, 04:10 PM
Well, i lived in Alaska 25 years, and that gal is a bigger "whiner" than anyone "I" even met in the bush! I don't know why she's worried about bears so much, her chain smokeing will kill her before any bear will get to her...

You guys don't really think there's bears wondering around in those snow storms looking for her, do you??? lol

DM

kendak
June 6, 2013, 04:21 PM
the only thing that would stop me from living there is the no running water/outhouse out back ...had enough of that when I was a kid in the MS. delta & if it gets colder than +45* I freeze !!...LOL:)

Certaindeaf
June 6, 2013, 04:26 PM
The thing that has puzzled me is the people living alone in isolated conditions, appear not to have back up plan for a what if?.
Didn't you see that shopping cart with greased up wheels? What you got?

hang fire
June 6, 2013, 09:33 PM
Didn't you see that shopping cart with greased up wheels? What you got?
Thanks for your most lucid and illuminating reply.

Certaindeaf
June 6, 2013, 09:41 PM
No problem. It's always good to be prepared.

TheCracker
June 6, 2013, 09:56 PM
Watching my 1st episode"Hunt, Barter, Steal". I'm watching because of this thread.

So far it looks great! I'd love to live in Alaska or at least try it out! Would be such a change from the 109 humidity of eastern Texas!

Ill keep the series on the DVR and keep watching.

jim in Anchorage
June 6, 2013, 09:59 PM
No one who has a choice lives in Kotzebue. 10 months Winter 2 of mosquito infested "summer"

TheCracker
June 6, 2013, 10:07 PM
No one who has a choice lives in Kotzebue. 10 months Winter 2 of mosquito infested "summer"

Lmao, that sounds like a total opposite of here. 2-3 months if cold weather with a few warm fronts getting up in the 80's some days. Heck, I deer hunted in a shirt sleeve shirt a couple days before Christmas and was sweating when I got to my spot. (Only reason I remember the hunt was that I killed a 8 point after not seeing a deer for over 10 hunts)

We have mosquito infestations from late April through November! Mix in sweltering heat with 90% humidity.

jim in Anchorage
June 6, 2013, 10:18 PM
No who has a choice lives in Kotzebue. 10 months Winter 2 of mosquito infested "summer"

Sheepdog1968
June 7, 2013, 12:17 AM
Sue was on the Discovery show Air Alaska which ran for several seasons. She came across much nicer on that show so I think a lot of it is the editing of this show If I recall, I think that Discovery show also filmed the fuel resupply to her.

Dr T
June 7, 2013, 11:16 AM
TheCracker:

Please note that "cold" in East Texas is not the same as "COLD" in Alaska. I have experienced both and East Texas cold during an Ice Storm is like a mild spring day (I lived in the Dallas area for 18 years). Also, it is rumored that the mosquitos in Alaska have to check with Air Traffic Control before taking off. Have experienced them, I am inclined to believe the rumors. Imagine so many mosquitos on your hand that you can't see any skin.

Alaska is beautiful, hard country. However, I prefer it to East Texas. I do not prefer it to West Texas, but that is a different story...

bassdogs
June 7, 2013, 11:19 AM
Also like the show, but don't think they have done a very good job explaining why "Sue" is up there. The good news and the bad news is that these shows are edited by producers to make them entertaining but also reasonably "real". With Sue it has been more about her miserable situation which doesn't make sense because it is after all a hunting / hiking / adventure camp in season. Those other structures are for housing, food prep, and supplies for the people who visit or pass thru as they head out to hunt or whatever.

My guess is that she has plenty of "emergency" gear if she is hit with a SHF event. Go to the web site for Kavic River Camp for more on the place.

bassdogs
June 7, 2013, 11:29 AM
Interested to see the post dissing the 44mag or 45-70. I have never met an experienced Ak vet who would suggest a SW500 over a 44mag for any number of reasons. The main one is availability of ammo. If you've ever been to AK., you know what I mean. I agree that a 12g is the best go to gun for bear defense, with the 44m as backup in a pinch.

Smoke'm if you've got them [SW500 or 454C] and take the time and $$ to get good with them. A whole lot of AK's who live and frequent the bush, won't leave home without the 44 on their hip and some type of long gun at hand. The handgun should not be your first or only choice.

hang fire
June 7, 2013, 10:33 PM
TheCracker:

Please note that "cold" in East Texas is not the same as "COLD" in Alaska. I have experienced both and East Texas cold during an Ice Storm is like a mild spring day (I lived in the Dallas area for 18 years). Also, it is rumored that the mosquitos in Alaska have to check with Air Traffic Control before taking off. Have experienced them, I am inclined to believe the rumors. Imagine so many mosquitos on your hand that you can't see any skin.

Alaska is beautiful, hard country. However, I prefer it to East Texas. I do not prefer it to West Texas, but that is a different story...
Liven in rural AK for seven years and never felt threatened by the weather. When got transferred down to WY, had the weather scare the Hades out of me several times that first winter.

Where we lived in AK the mosquitos were treated as pets, it was the no-seeums and white socks which drove us painfully nuts.

caribou
June 8, 2013, 08:22 AM
+I'm glad you all like the show.


The comment about the offhand rifle shooting is explained well with this one word; editing.
She did miss her first shot at her Caribou, as the rear slide was forward on her M-39, at about 500 yards and I called it high. She looked, adjusted and nailed a fat Female with the next one. One camera shot is actually her shooting a Fox (with the tree in the background) and over the course of the filiming, there were quite few Caribou hunted, and that time we caught two.

I can only find a few "If you were there you would know" but honestly, its 90% what we were doing as we did it. We get a lot of say so and narrate our selfs, so its basicly more documentary than realitys non reality.The rifle shots were simply blended in editing as we were not out shooting a lot or getting filming of different angles, as ammo is scares in the village, and we cant burn ammo for the film shooting in the air.

Queen_of_Thunder
June 8, 2013, 09:07 AM
Well, i lived in Alaska 25 years, and that gal is a bigger "whiner" than anyone "I" even met in the bush! I don't know why she's worried about bears so much, her chain smokeing will kill her before any bear will get to her...

You guys don't really think there's bears wondering around in those snow storms looking for her, do you??? lol

DM
Let me say I like the show and if I was 40 years younger I would be headed to Ak. but I'm stuck in West Texas.


As to bears. I'm smart enough to realize that if there are brown bears in the area I'm nothing more than a snack for them. Snow or no snow. I sure don't want one deciding my shelter is a nice place to hold up till the storm passes. Anywho its a good show.

hang fire
June 8, 2013, 09:27 AM
Let me say I like the show and if I was 40 years younger I would be headed to Ak. but I'm stuck in West Texas.


As to bears. I'm smart enough to realize that if there are brown bears in the area I'm nothing more than a snack for them. Snow or no snow. I sure don't want one deciding my shelter is a nice place to hold up till the storm passes. Anywho its a good show.
The well fed coastal brown bears are laid back and complacent as compared to the much smaller Barren Ground grizzlies. These smaller interior grizzlies operate on a short fuse and are mostly ready for a fight at scent or (poor eye) sight.

scaatylobo
June 8, 2013, 11:40 AM
OK, so most of the 'problems' I have with the show are related to the silly azz editors and "their" idea of how it should read.

That explains a HUGE amount as the 'editors' are THE problem with most TV shows.They are shown the correct/right/ONLY way to do something,then they take 'poetic license' and ruin facts with fantasy.

Sue is still a wonderment as to why and how she found herself in such a miserable place [ her view ] with such terrible conditions that it is a miracle she is alive.Possibily its the 'editors' again,but she sure seems like a miserable old cow [ and she aint that old ].

Still cannot fathom INTENTIONALLY sleeping all winter in a 'bear food bag' if there were ANY options.

12many
June 8, 2013, 02:43 PM
Thanks Bassdog. I was wondering why she was up there, other than she does not like society that much or people. The backstory is helpful.

rodregier
June 8, 2013, 11:20 PM
re: backup dwelling/supplies. Saw an episode of (Air Alaska?) with a fellow living in a very remote AK location. Had a whole backup tent w/supplies deployed in addition to his regular cabin.

caribou
June 9, 2013, 12:12 AM
We, too , keep a couple of cache's, its full of tools and xtras, and we have one for dry'd foods/furs and one for gas.
Most houses are small for heats saving sake up this way, and extra "stuffs" is usually kept in an out building , in case of fire, animals getting in or just having the xtra room without having to heat it. Not like a military or 'survival' cache's, these are in regular use, but there are 4 places near our favored camping spots where we keep things outta view, as we put gas there and then our fish and such when we have more than we can take in one load, and others need not help themselves so easily.

At least if Sue is complaining, living on her own and using stove oil, ect, it is real......., Ive talked with some of these fellas that film her.... and that's how she lives below Zero, tending her business. I do not understand the need to winter over, but if its Hers, then shes Home, where ever that may be :D Theres no need to be sane or reasonable here ~~LOL!!~~

cacoltguy
June 9, 2013, 04:07 AM
I just started watching this show a couple of weeks ago and like I'm hooked on it! I'm not sure what goes on behind the scenes but I think they have done a really good job of showing what you guys go through to survive and making it interesting to the viewer. I'm definitely impressed and thank you for letting people get a glimpse of your life up there. Congrats on the show and good job! It kind of makes you realize that it's the small things in life you need to stop and appreciate.

Queen_of_Thunder
June 9, 2013, 08:44 AM
Still cannot fathom INTENTIONALLY sleeping all winter in a 'bear food bag' if there were ANY options.




Like Key West Flordia?

Dr.Rob
June 10, 2013, 02:33 AM
I've enjoyed the show. My dad spent a year at Fort Yukon in the mid 60's and this show is making some of those stories 'come to life' more than "the Alaska Experiment" or other such shows.

It's a place I'd love to visit but I'm not sure I'm tough enough to live there.

bassdogs
June 12, 2013, 12:08 PM
The show has a priority setting on my DVR and I look forward to it each week. I know that the season is already in "the can" so feedback at this point won't affect the remaining 1st season episodes. I do hope that as they debrief and prepare for season 2 that they are careful to keep the show slanted toward being real instead of going the drama reality direction where its mostly trash. Some suggestions: Show different aspects of the characters lives. One guy is a guide, how about showing him guiding. Sue's camp is a layover for hunters and bush adventures. How about showing some of the "in season" stuff. Caribeu lives the homesteader life as much as possible, but he needs to move beyond fighting to get to Eagle and the fishing and hunting that this season focuses on. Realize that is what defines this lifestyle, but there has got to be some "fun" somewhere. Understand that the show is about life -Zero so its not surprising we get winter. The truth however is that it is not so extreme for at least a few short months. I'd like to see that too.

Visited Alaska in 08 and 11, traveling over 95% of the paved roads [outside of town] and hundreds of miles that weren't. The first trip was in early Spring and the last was timed perfectly [total fluke] to see the fall color that Ak has to offer [mostly yellow].

Final comment: The producers are over the top IMHO with the isolated [can't get out] condition. Cell coverage is spotty at best in the bush so I understand that, but at a minimum there is VHF radio and shortwave. Have watched the Coast Guard Alaska series and they make it pretty straight forward that they can get help to where it is needed. While some of the people on this show [Sue comes to mind] are truely way way off the grid, she admits she has internet and sat tv. Fans of this show can handle the truth.

rodregier
June 12, 2013, 01:30 PM
One of the challenges for a real-world show is that getting releases and approvals to include clients in photography can be problematic. That will tend to push producers into recording and presenting more-self-contained sequences with existing participants.

On comms, sat phones (for those that can afford them) has likely changed some of the isolation issues that were extant in the past.

bassdogs
June 12, 2013, 08:41 PM
For sure am not doubting the difficulties of living this type of lifestyle. You really have to visit Ak to grasp how much of it is way way way off the grid. Only accessable by plane or boat. Store stuff is often not available and what is stocked is unbelievably high. The subsistence hunting and fishing is real for many Alaskans. Good point about getting releases from non-regular cast on video. Still I think it would add an additional angle to the lives these folks live.

Am concerned that without expanding the story, the hunting, fishing, crabbing, etc will get redundent in just a few more episodes.

scaatylobo
June 14, 2013, 02:17 PM
I for the life of me see no reason to push 'Sue' at us so hard as she must be one of THE most unpleasant people I have ever heard speak,AND that is not in person.

She sure as hell thinks a great deal about herself --- btw if she plans on surviving a real attack [ she did have a rifle in hand ] then she better find a way to shoot with those HUGE mittens on :banghead:.

In the time it took to remove them = she could be dinner.

The rest of the show is a hoot and I feel for those hearty souls that are actually out there and living a hand to mouth existence [ unlike 'sue' ]

I would have LOVED to try that stuff as a younger man,I know my limitations and that is not for this old timer to start at my age and condition.

I would have [ and SHOULD have ] jumped at the chance back when I was an Iron worker and they wanted us to boom out to Ak for the pipeline.

CoRoMo
June 14, 2013, 05:35 PM
I for the life of me see no reason to push 'Sue' at us so hard...
Sue was on the Discovery show Air Alaska which ran for several seasons.
Which means she might have started this series with more pull, so to speak. My guess is that Discovery wanted her on this show because of the reception she received on the previous one, and she was able to leverage their hankering into a contract agreement that she be given x% of airtime.

harrygunner
June 14, 2013, 07:19 PM
Enjoy the show, very much. Thanks and stay safe.

But, I feel like a wimp whenever I go the grocery store for food. :)

Dentite
June 16, 2013, 01:13 PM
I now just fast-forward when Sue is on.

scaatylobo
June 17, 2013, 07:24 PM
So was watching last nights new episode and was really enjoying seeing how its done FOR REAL.

Then Sue came on and I found the MUTE button was my best friend.

I cannot see why they spend so much camera time on such a miserable person.

AND reality TV has to come to grips with "REALITY" - that being that there is a CAMERAMAN there and she is not going to freeze alone.

The point being that the cameraman got there and has a means to leave or survive,kinda takes away from her "survival" or freezing death no ?.

The rest of the show and the people are amazing and truly tough,they don't live in a HEATED COMPANY TENT like Sue and they are truly living the life of an Alaskan, OUTSIDE -- leastwise that is how I see it.

I forgot ,can someone tell me who is CARIBOU [ on the show ] on this site - the Alaskan ?.

I would truly love to see a contest to win a week up there with any of those true survivors ---- except Sue of course.

caribou
June 17, 2013, 09:35 PM
I am Caribou here, but on TV, In taller and they call me "Chip", my wife is Agnes :D

Look up my old posts here on THR and you'll see why they flew out and found me ~~LOL!!~~
I'm thinking thell be around a lot. We just finished 3 more episodes, and theres more to be done.

Glad ya'all like it :)

KMatch
June 18, 2013, 09:39 AM
Is Sue the one stalking the wolves as if it's a contest of whits? I keep mentally cheering for the wolves so it must be the same person...

95XL883
June 18, 2013, 01:44 PM
Caribou,

I love the show. It is interesting seeing the different hunting techniques. I never thought of driving rabbits into a net. In the last episode, you didn't get any. I hope you get a lot in the next episode. Your daughters are absolutely precious.

KM, Sue has had some wolves in the distance but little up close. Basically she was just trying to keep them at a distance with some rifle shots. Erik has a hunt going for a lone wolf that is raiding is fur traps. I'm amazed the way he just walks around apparently unarmed with a wolf somewhere nearby and he is looking for a wolverine or two to skin. Maybe he has that 22 (that he uses to punch holes in stove pipe) with him?

So what is the wisdom in walking about apparently unarmed while looking for potentially dangerous critters? God help him if runs into a bear. Of course, I could just be a fraidy cat. :D

scaatylobo
June 18, 2013, 08:48 PM
Guess you missed the fact that there is a camera crew,and I bet THEY are smart enough to have a real gun.

AND he knows that they have a real gun,so why hump his - makes him very smart ,ya think ?.

caribou
June 18, 2013, 09:22 PM
Wolf attacks are almost none existent. There are no old Eskimo storys that describe Wolves attacking anyone, and they are seen as a nonthreat up this way, and are very wary. Also, Bears are in hibernation and Wolverine never attack anyone either, but they will put up a staunch defence if caught raiding your stuffs ~~LOL!!~~ they are tough to kill, even in a trap.

Deaf Smith
June 18, 2013, 11:28 PM
TheCracker:

Please note that "cold" in East Texas is not the same as "COLD" in Alaska. I have experienced both and East Texas cold during an Ice Storm is like a mild spring day (I lived in the Dallas area for 18 years). Also, it is rumored that the mosquitos in Alaska have to check with Air Traffic Control before taking off. Have experienced them, I am inclined to believe the rumors. Imagine so many mosquitos on your hand that you can't see any skin.

Alaska is beautiful, hard country. However, I prefer it to East Texas. I do not prefer it to West Texas, but that is a different story...
I just got back from Alaska. Yes a pleasure cruise to such as Skagway and Juno.

Now those mosquitoes... East Texas ones are small and very fast (and I'm a Texican for sure.) Those up there I found were huge and slow. I'm an ace now with over 10 kills (and 3 probables) from my trip there.

It is a heck of a country. I know I went the easy route but then my whole family came and they wanted to go the tourist way. Sadly we saw more trinket salesmen than anything else.

One day I'll go back via the Alaskan inland waterway and rent a 4x4 and see the interior.

Deaf

Dr T
June 19, 2013, 10:52 AM
Deaf,

Once when fishing the Nushagak in southwest Alaska, I slapped the back of my hand and killed 20 or so. Just sayin'...They are not bad if you are in the wind or on the water, but take 20 steps into the bush and it is another matter.
---------------

Another note, after carefully watching the last two episodes back to back (thank you, Comcast), I have come to the conclusion that Sue's image was made more in the editing room than anywhere else. She strikes me as being cut from the same mold as a number of ranch women I have known in West Texas--but perhaps a bit less sociable. This sort of country tends to form strong, independent women that are capable of holding things together on their own without a man around to do the heavy lifting. My mother, grandmother, and great grandmother were all such women. Since these are all gone now, it is nice to have a reminder of the type.

harrygunner
June 19, 2013, 04:26 PM
I think Sue is important to this show. She is a clear, stark depiction of the kind of person who could live under her conditions. Her primal need for independence is rare given humans are social animals. Has me considering the possibility she experienced a deep betrayal in her past.

She is a part of Alaska, one of many parts we in the lower 48 are unlikely to experience. Another reason to appreciate the show.

BTW, Erik is seen with a sidearm on occasion. See attached.

scaatylobo
June 19, 2013, 06:21 PM
The question was about bears etc - and Ericks sidearm is a Ruger .22 mark II [ I am pretty sure ].

Not exactly bear medicine,unless he shoots the cameraman and RUNS.

As to Sue's caustic personality,I am sorry but all the explanations don't wash for me.

Y'all like her then, enjoy.

Me I like people that can be alone and enjoy the silence - or leave and go someplace else.

I do note that only Erick is alone,unlike all the others shown [ cept for Sue ] and he seems like a very well adjusted person that handles the wilderness MUCH better than Sue.

And remember that Sue seems to not leave her 'compound' so she is not in the league of all the rest on that show = least that is my 'not so humble opinion'.

Deaf Smith
June 19, 2013, 07:10 PM
Yep, looks like Eric has a Ruger stainless .22!


Dr T,

Oh well, my $$ is all gone so no return to Alaska for a while! It's now 92 degrees where I'm at in Texas!

I just hope some liberals see the show and say the magic words 'Why.. and why not' and decide to become more an independent thinker and DOER!

And maybe that is what this show is all about. Standing on your own two feet and not at some government hog trough.

Deaf

Cosmoline
June 19, 2013, 08:11 PM
One day I'll go back via the Alaskan inland waterway and rent a 4x4 and see the interior.

You can just fly up here and drive around too. Truth is I've seen more wildlife right in and around Anchorage than I've ever seen out in the bush or when I was living in the sticks. There's a trail just south of the city that almost always has moose on it if you get an early start in the morning. Bear too in the fall.

I've watched clips of Sue and she's not that unusual for an Alaskan woman living in the bush. I'm not sure what you folks are expecting. Soft spoken women in silken finery? I get the sense that she likes showing off, and the crew likely encourages her.

It's now 92 degrees where I'm at in Texas!

It's close to that here in south central believe it or not. I'm dying.

DM~
June 19, 2013, 08:28 PM
I just got back from Alaska. Yes a pleasure cruise to such as Skagway and Juno.
Deaf

(Juneau)

So, you never made it to Alaska???

We always called where you went, "north" Seattle!

DM

Sheepdog1968
June 19, 2013, 09:54 PM
Alaska has been in the 80s. I was there on a cruise this year and still check the weather. My current dream is parlay my PhD in chemistry into a teaching opportunity of some kind.

Deaf Smith
June 19, 2013, 10:59 PM
(Juneau)

So, you never made it to Alaska???

We always called where you went, "north" Seattle!

DM
Ok, Juneau. Sorry about that.

We went up to Glacier Bay and that was about it.

Yea fly to Anchorage or Fairbanks and start from there. I hope the airports aren't like Seattle with those new sound 'x-rays' and such I had to put up with.. see I don't like being searched.

Yea there was alot of Alaska we didn't see. Something like 99.432 percent of it.

Deaf

hang fire
June 20, 2013, 10:25 AM
The question was about bears etc - and Ericks sidearm is a Ruger .22 mark II [ I am pretty sure ].

Not exactly bear medicine,unless he shoots the cameraman and RUNS.

As to Sue's caustic personality,I am sorry but all the explanations don't wash for me.

Y'all like her then, enjoy.

Me I like people that can be alone and enjoy the silence - or leave and go someplace else.

I do note that only Erick is alone,unlike all the others shown [ cept for Sue ] and he seems like a very well adjusted person that handles the wilderness MUCH better than Sue.

And remember that Sue seems to not leave her 'compound' so she is not in the league of all the rest on that show = least that is my 'not so humble opinion'.
Interior Alaska in midwinter is not bear weather, they are holed up hibernating until warmer times. Now if a week long warm Chinook (Foehn) wind had been blowing in mid-January, that might get some of them on the prowl.

Cosmoline
June 20, 2013, 02:25 PM
I hope the airports aren't like Seattle with those new sound 'x-rays' and such I had to put up with.. see I don't like being searched.

For commercial flights they're all like that now. For small 135 flights it's not nearly as bad. I'd suggest a flight to Anchorage from Seattle, a day to look around, then you have the options of road system north or south or flights west and you can choose based on weather conditions. If it's rainy and nasty south you can often find clear skies to the north. And sometimes if there are forest fires and haze north you can head south down to Kenai/Homer for clear air. For fishing time your trip to maximize overlap between species. So if you time it right a charter out of Seward can sweep for silvers, halibut, ling cod, and a variety of others. Vacuum packed, frozen and shipped you'll have enough fish for a year.

Dr T
June 20, 2013, 02:55 PM
And if you are in Anchorage, I suggest that you at least check out the lobby in the Millenium Hotel close to the airport (the beer garden is under the final approach to the sea plane base. It is better than many natural history museums. (And the halibut chunks in bar were pretty good the last time I was there).

Deaf Smith
June 20, 2013, 06:13 PM
Sigh... why can't I go now? Oh yea, a wife! Knew there was something holding me back!

I sure won't go in December but I'd love to go back and go north this time. I looked at the map and saw how puny were were in visiting Alaska. Like going 50 miles in the Texas Panhandle and then turning back.

I'll have to settle for some Southwest Texas fun this summer, and maybe Crockett National Forrest. Hotter than heck but at lest one is in the wilds.

Deaf

hang fire
June 20, 2013, 07:11 PM
When we lived in AK (1969-76) a cheap way to see a lot of coastal AK, was the ferries of the Alaska Marine Highway System. More expensive to take vehicle, but allows one to do some driving in different locales.



Map of routes and video at link:

The Alaska Marine Highway

http://www.dot.state.ak.us/amhs/routes.shtml

Watch Our Routes Video

Schedule icon
Watch our routes video to learn more about the regions and communities that you can explore along the Alaska Marine Highway.
.
With 656,425 square miles of rugged wilderness, scenic beauty and abundant wildlife, Alaska is a big place! Which means traveling in Alaska presents some unique opportunities. Unlike the 'lower 48' many of our communities are not accessible by a land based road system so in many areas the primary means of travel is by air or sea. The Alaska Marine Highway makes up a large part of our 'highway system' and is a route so special it has been designated National Scenic Byway and an All American Road, the only marine route with this designation.

From the southern terminus in Bellingham, Washington the Marine Highway stretches more than 3,500 miles to Dutch Harbor with stops in Prince Rupert, BC, throughout the Inside Passage, across the Gulf of Alaska to Prince William Sound and along the Aleutian Chain. The Alaska Marine Highway is the perfect way to experience the communities that populate Alaska's diverse and scenic coastline.

Fares: http://www.dot.state.ak.us/amhs/doc/fares/S13W14_SWTariffs.pdf

Deaf Smith
June 20, 2013, 08:17 PM
Ok question.

If on the Alaska Marine Highway from Seattle (if possible) can I carry my revolver with me?

Ok found some answers. It's ok on the ship as long as it is checked in BUT Canada is another matter. Must avoid it if I can!

Thanks,

Deaf

caribou
June 20, 2013, 09:34 PM
Anyone who can legally carry a pistol, "can" carry it concealed, in Alaska. Concealed Carry laws are like Vermonts CC laws, as in if you can own it, you can carry it, resident or non.
But not in bars, or while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, in court houses and on propertys that don't allow such, like airports and military bases, who can deny you entry. You must advise any police your in contact with that you are carrying concealed. That's about it.

If your touching Canada, things might be waaaaaay different.

Dr T
June 21, 2013, 10:56 AM
Deaf,

The scenery in Alaska is a lot better than that in the first 50 miles of the Texas Panhandle. When I am going down the the ranch from Colorado on 287, the scenery doesn't get interesting for me until I get to Big Spring (since I don't take the time to make the detour to the canyon). That drive is the main reason I have a CCW.

Thanks, Cosmoline, for summing up my assessment of Sue. She is not that unlike many solitary women (and men) that prefer to be self-reliant rather cosseted by society.

scaatylobo
June 21, 2013, 11:54 AM
Sue v/s Erick

HUGE difference between a man that is alone AND in the wildness,and a female [ I did not say Lady ] that is hunkered down safe [ reasonably ] and secure with food,water,HEAT,and lots of guns and ammo.

I just am of the opinion [ yes its a free country ] that you do not need to show a gruff exterior to any and all just because your a woman alone.

Most would get the idea that your more than capable if they see the guns all over the place [ that is a good idea IMNSHO ].

Drama is the only part of any show that I object to,and she is a drama queen.

Dr T
June 21, 2013, 02:06 PM
Just a note on video production:

The power of editing and context are huge. If you have ever been quoted out of context, it is easy to understand how words and actions can be manipulated during the editorial process.

I would submit that if you take the right 10 minutes out of anyone's week, they can be made to look like an angel--or the opposite. The purpose of commercial video production (besides, as one person described the evening new years ago, "to sell soap") is to create a narrative that will keep the audience engaged long enough to look at the ads. If you closely examine these narratives, you will find that most have heroes and villains. Sometimes these are created in the editing room by careful selection of what is shown.

Cosmoline
June 21, 2013, 02:10 PM
Folks who are alone (really alone) out there also tend to TALK TOO LOUDLY when they talk, and sometimes talk nervously because they don't get much practice and probably were never very sure of what do with other people. I remember one woman I knew in the sticks who would talk in aloud incessant voice and tell the same story over and over and over again.

There's a difference between the folks who live in villages with families and the folks sometimes called end-of-the-roaders who end up drifting into the state because we're too weird or out of place to operate in the lower 48.

caribou
June 21, 2013, 09:51 PM
Folks that live in remote villages or even in camps along the rivers between villages usually have something 'end of the roader's" don't; Family. Blood, inlaw and married into will get you more relatives that youll know what to do with.

That can make a huge difference in economy, survivability and sanity. My wifes sister drive me nuts, and solitude is evasive ~~LOL!!~~.

Besides, when you have "family" in a native way, even those that live alone, theres still a very social outlet, those who lone it, are quite 'alone' and it tells. The family net is cast wide amongst the villages here , as people move to marry and such, and even I can roll into a village Ive never been in before and find "family" and be treated just as such.
To Eskimo, to be alone is to die. Not that you will in this modern age of communication gadgets, but mentally, being alone is a vert trying condition to find yerself in, at least in the Arctic.

smokey262
June 22, 2013, 12:38 AM
Caribou,

Thanks for sharing your life with us. The show is fascinating. I appreciate all of the participants, even Sue :)

On the episode where your sister-in-law was visiting I recall that you indicated that there were 18 people to feed that day. Were all of them staying in your home with you?

The number 1 thing that I wonder about in these Alaska reality shows is that it seems like the majority of people who heat with wood never ever have enough to get through winter. Is it because summer is too short?

rcmodel
June 22, 2013, 12:55 AM
Family. Blood, inlaw and married into will get you more relatives that youll know what to do with.caribou
I'm getting too personal maybe??

But I wondered if you are native Alaskan too??

I understand your wife and relatives are, as I have met a few Aleut woman here in Lawrence KS at the HINU with the chin tattoos.

But did you go there from somewhere else and marry?
Or were you born there?

Myself?
Spawn of New England Kansas settlers of mixed English / Irish decent, too complicated to decipher.
I'm a Hinds 57 so to speak.

With a full blood Cherokee great great Grandmother!!!

Hope you don't mind me asking how you got there in the first place, as you don't look or talk native Aleut (or other) too much on TV??

rc

Certaindeaf
June 22, 2013, 01:10 AM
100% lucky is how I see it.

caribou
June 22, 2013, 04:28 PM
~~LOL!!~~
No Native Alaskan Blood here, in me, that's why I don't hunt Seals, Walrus, and such, but the wife, inlaws and the kids all do.
Im proudly from Kalispell Montana, when I was 19, I just happened to venture up this way to visit my mom and brother who lived in Kotzebue. I got a job with a better pay than I had in MT ( Loading/unloading Herc's for 25$ an hour vs 3.35$ as a field hand) and the sky was the limit......Red Fox skins were 90$-100$ each and the hunting/fishing here wide open and profitable, so I use my year of gaining residency, learnd snowmachines and local tricks to stay undead and bought stuff that worked, as my lil bro told, and was soon outfitted and with an inside guide to the crazy world of ice, snow and Eskimo' I just started having fun making a living. People here like people that work no matter their orgin or color, and I had plenty of guys willing to have me along, and I learnd as I went....hunters, fishermen, wood cutters, Mammoth Hunters,trappers, Reindeer Herders, Dog Mushers and most guys that did it all, according to seasons, and its been a groove since.
When I got along with the wife, she was doing then as she does now. She married me quick like 'cause I aint her cuzin. ~~LOL!!~~

scaatylobo
June 23, 2013, 04:33 PM
Sounds like the stuff that books & movies are made of.

Many of us envy your life --- yes even as hard as it really is.

real men love a challenge and you seem to have met the bear at the door and now he is your rug :).

I had a chance when I was Iron worker to boom out to the pipeline ,I was not about to step THAT far outside my comfort zone - stayed here to work,I still regret that.

Sheepdog1968
June 23, 2013, 11:05 PM
So Caribou, what stuff works in Alaska and what doesn't? Obviously, I'm curious in terms of firearms but curious in general. Is there stuff you avoid? Are the certain things besides firearms that you always carry when going out?

sawgrass
June 23, 2013, 11:06 PM
Great show.
Great thread.

I loved the rabbit hunting with the net and the family. Also loved the snow target and Agnes shooting the Mosin.

jim in Anchorage
June 24, 2013, 06:15 AM
Made it to E4. Sue is now surrounded by wolves who are going to send "scouts" to "draw her out" so the one she "can't see" can get her from behind. I think lot's of this is slanted to ignorant viewers.

bassdogs
June 24, 2013, 09:35 AM
Don't know if you have any interaction with the other characters on the show, but thought I'd ask. Sue is getting a lot of attention [much of it negative] concerning the way she appears on the show. Nat Geo doesn't seem to be vary viewer friendly to allow us to ask direct ??'s to the producers of the show or to give them feedback. Any suggestions on how to let them know what the fans are saying?

Do you ever have group meetings with the producers? I suspect that at least some of the activities shown on the screen are staged, well maybe not totally staged but at least edited to add drama and excitement to the episode. How much control do you have over how you and your family are presented on the show?

hang fire
June 24, 2013, 10:48 AM
Caribou: No Native Alaskan Blood here, in me, that's why I don't hunt Seals, Walrus, and such, but the wife, inlaws and the kids all do.


Speaking of walrus. This is a pic of me when worked for ASU on the the research vessel Acona. Was 1970 on Walrus Island in the Bering Sea.

One of the scientist's from ASU wanted some fresh walrus scat to study. so kinda got up close and personal with them before the tide came in.

http://hstrial-rchambers.homestead.com/img267_op_800x612.jpg

http://hstrial-rchambers.homestead.com/img262.jpg

scaatylobo
June 24, 2013, 03:43 PM
Thanks ---- had to clean my keyboard as it got a coffee bath through my nose :neener:.

Hope I can repay the favor,but you are SO SPOT ON !!.

Too bad the producers are more interested in making silly stuff [ reminds me of "DUAL SURVIVOR" - ya know barefoot in snow ] Than in making stuff that we might learn from.

@Caribou -

I too would LOVE to see a real list [ and pic's if not intrusive ] of the REAL gear y'all use and keep on hand.

Rifles-pistols-shotguns-hand saws-axes-KNIVES-boots-hats- and thanks for the show.

caribou
June 25, 2013, 04:52 AM
Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeellllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll.............

We done have interactions at all (so far) with others in the cast, but I do belive theres gonna be a new guy and one dropping off, but beyond that, I don't know any of them.

We just don't have time to "Act", we get a ton of film done and then the editors cut it down into a 'story' about the doings they have filmed. We have had little nee to make a story up or interrupt our cycle of doing things. Granted, we have to duplicate a couple things, like snow machining past the camera, and letting them set up ahead while we wait, then drive by and be slow enough to let them past us for the next drive by, , or leaving the house or entering, but the rest is on the fly........but its fun watching the camera work really hard too :D......The camera really set the mood, but soon the series will come to summer and 24 hour sun and the mood will be as good.

We narrate ourselves, and say /describe ourselves as we go along. Sue, I belive, is VERY scared of any and all predators, while my wife, per say, has no fear nor was ever taught to fear Wolves or Wolverine, as Eskimo' know that Wolf and Wolverines are only dangerous to your unattended Dog team and when caught in a trap, other than that, they are very elusive and a dog team is safe with the presence of Man around, and Man is safe from Bears with Dogs around... The wife will not talk about bears out of respect for them, but she will say factual events wev'e had with Bears. Nor will she eat Bear meat, its quite cultural.

What the editors do with 4-7 days of film is not in our control, but , with only a couple exceptions, were pretty much portrayed as we are. Sometimes the narrations don't quite fit the scene (we were there, we know) but they are often trying to describe several sets of images flashed across the screen, mear seconds all melded into , perhaps, a minute.

Often , Im not sure what they have crafted until I see the show. Lately, I've missed them, but Ill catch up.

jim in Anchorage
June 25, 2013, 05:10 AM
Bou since you're on, what do your wifes chin tattoos mean?

caribou
June 25, 2013, 05:30 AM
I figure its a customary tattoo, as there used to be near every woman had such up this way, until about the 1920's and theres only a couple dozen now.....about 1/2 are 40 and younger, and if a woman wants such, go for it , I told her..... :D I have the lightening bolt from between AC and the DC on my forearm, so Im no one to tell her not to get a cool tatt, a real tribal tattoo at that, in Kobuk river kinda way.

I might throw on that Mosin Nagants have been my favorite all around rifles, for years, in peticular M-39 Finn varients. An old .22lr Romainian and an old Winchester pump 12 gauge have always served me well. I had antique rifles and such collected up for years, and I shot them all. I like small knifes for skinning and gutting, old Timers are very good. I also make alotta my own gear, as its made for and from things already up this way, and that materials at hand.

Bull Nutria
June 25, 2013, 08:04 AM
Caribou,
what type and magnification is in the scope Agnes using on the Mosin? i have to confess i did not think much of the Mosins until i started reading of your success with them.

What brand scope is it? Agnes and that scoped mosin make a deadly combination for some critters??

Did any one post episode 6 on Youtube as i could not find it and forgot to set my recorder, i did see a short clip of the mosin sight-in though.

Bull

scaatylobo
June 25, 2013, 08:09 AM
Lots of answers in a few posts :-)

I could tell the film crew was making y'all run over scenes - the tell tale tracks of the machines and footprints are a REAL giveaway,guess they don't understand that = LOL.

I was interested to see that many use older guns [ such as yourself ] and that the young kid [ Erick ] was a fan of modern M-4 type rifles.

I own both and I know that if I were heading up your way,I want a rifle that is HARDY and proven = Mosin is a great choice.

jim in Anchorage
June 25, 2013, 08:45 PM
Bou- I ask about the tat because on the TV show hell on wheels set in 1860's Nebraska, there is woman who was kidnapped by Indians and they gave her a near identical tattoo.
http://www.amctv.com/shows/hell-on-wheels/cast/eva

sawgrass
June 25, 2013, 11:48 PM
A few years ago I was able to spend two weeks in Alaska, flew in drove/flew around.
It is absolutely beautiful. Great fishing out of Seldovia.

The show is great.

Caribou there is something special, even on the show living as your family lives.
I thank the Creator for your wife, her family and others who respect and love what is around us.

caribou
June 27, 2013, 02:40 AM
That tatt on that show is kinda similar, but a few thousand mailes from here, and these folks are Eskimo, decidedly not Indian.

Only accurate rifles are interesting, and an M-39 version of a Mosin in the cold is like a puppy and a little kid on a sunny day. Lots of fun.....The wife has her favorite Vkt Made M-39, something shes hunted with for 10 or so years.

She bought herself an M91/30 with a 3.5 power PU scope on top, a Soviet surplus sniping rifle. She getting used of using it, and likes the chin weld on the stock, as opposed to a cheek weld, that is very doable wearing alotta hat, hood, mask, scarf's, ect in deep cold. Takeing aim with a regular rifle, especially with a cheek and comb on the stock kinda drives alotta Eskimo nuts, so they tend to do alterations that accommodate heavy clothing and wide cheeks. Might be why they made AK stocks as they do.....
Anyways, its her "Seal Rifle" as tight precision is needed for a basicly 'head shot only" kind of animals, as they tend to nap atop ice and aim at the water a few inches away, and a twitch sends them into the water face first, and straight for the bottom...... Thank God for Fish finders and stout trebbel hooks to get 'em up, but its better to take them proper and blow their brains out atop the ice.

The crew dosent get us ran around too much, but we do slow and let them pass, so they can see us go by or land or take off, but we go alotta places and in 10 days they get alotta film and scenes of us leaveing and returning. They often spoil the scene with tracks and spare rides around, but that's not often, as well we often take trails that hundreds drive, but it depends on the day.Sometimes they wait outside to get us in the morning and such, but we put a stop to that and told them to have coffee instead of freeze, 'cause we had decided not to go out that cold morning :D ~~LOL!!~~ The easiest way to see if the vids are timely is to see the three frostbites on Agnes, where her sunglasses bit her cheeks and nose, leaving dark brown marks..

hso
June 27, 2013, 04:15 PM
I like small knifes for skinning and gutting, old Timers are very good.

Do you use the new Old Timers made after Schrade went under in 2004 or the ones earler?

caribou
June 29, 2013, 01:47 AM
I had no idea Schrade is outta the game, but I have bought a few Oldtimers these last couple years, and have no complaints.
I actually own quite a few knifes, depending on the job, but skinning and gutting only needs three inches of blade to do efficient work.

bassdogs
June 29, 2013, 08:13 PM
Bou - First thanks for the feedback on my previous post. Got one more from the last episode. I understand that the TP is a traditional solution to mobil shelter, but why not a modern tent system? Much more compact and less weight. New ones almost set themselves up and come in an endless set of configurations. Just seems dragging the poles takes up a lot of room. Love the skin sleeping bags but the same ? as before. Do you ever use the modern sub 0 bags?

Do you go with traditional stuff because its better or because it just fits your lifestyle?

rcmodel
June 29, 2013, 08:25 PM
I am 99.9% sure I should let caribou answer this.
But I can't resist!

Perhaps they do not have several thousand dollars cash on hand to outfit the whole family with state-of-the art artic sleeping bags and nylon tents??

When traditional methods work as well, and are almost free for the taking??

rc

John3921
June 29, 2013, 10:24 PM
I love the show- though i have to wonder how much is 'staged' for tv. Like all the conflict on DC- have to wonder if it's real, or in context.

It looks to me like they all use what works. Old School, new school, whatever works and whatever is within means.

A bit dated - but the polar expeditions of the last century - Amundsen made it because he studied the people and methods of the polar regions. Scott died because they used the most modern technology available and it was not up to the job at hand.

caribou
June 30, 2013, 02:33 AM
Rc has most of it right there.

Using what works is the name of the game. The more uses we get outta something, the better.

The Caribou bags are superior for our uses as we can repair them locally, can turn them out and beat the frost out of them in the cold, and get right back in, warm and dry, as well are wind proof and very durable, as well as very roomy. We often undress our inner layers in them, and redress in them, while out below Zero.
The Tepee can be set up anywhere, and no stakes to pound in to permafrost, ice or powder snow, just set it up. The canvas is multi use, as are the poles on the trail and in camp, and we can fix that , too, anywhere. We can fit our wide sleeping bed sled and a fire, and a couple grub boxes in there and be in a sweet home. We can wrap different layers apon it and keep it wind/rain/snow and critters out, and with a cap atop, snug and warm, as well we can stand up in there too. A very nice feature many tents don't have, as well as we don't have to stitch nylon in the dark and cold winds or worry about bungi cords slacking in the deep cold or brittle fiberglass tubes breaking.

Not much at all is "staged" 'cept us leaveing and arriveing, where we wait to arrive while they set up (a real bummer 100yards from the front door after a 200 mile ride) However some of the hunting scenes are blended, as differing views are show, but the differing colors of clothing show that, but we weren't 'staging' anything, its the editors who throw in an odd 2 seconds of this or that. One was my wife shooting at a Fox that was shown as a caribou hunting scene, we got a laugh ,'cause we were there, but it wasn't a detraction from what really happened, it was a nice sunset panorama, so I don't think they were misleading, just throwing up some beauty. There were others, for sure, but ya just gotta watch. Some storys they made short, like the time I tried to get a Fox or two for the 40$ the city offerd. I didn't get one that day, but by X mas, I had 29, but they didint stick around to film that.....~~LOL!!~~ they shot me setting traps , and checking them the next morning, removing them so kids wouldn't get in them outta curiosity and such.....they shot that footage the day before they left, so I was suprized they made a story outta that at all, but , indeed, its the editors who translate the story of a few days down to minutes and its not all explained. I would love to have some quips they have of me further explained, but alas, I have no editorial control :D Dont matter to me, its fun, and I know its 95% cool.

JPG19
June 30, 2013, 04:04 AM
Since it is on the National Geographic channel, I expect that it will be well done.

Unfortunately you can't guarantee that anymore from the NG channel. I just recently watched an episode of Ultimate Factories on Ferrari. They episode was on the construction of the Ferrari 599 GTB and they refer to the car that is being assembled as such throughout the show when in fact it is a Ferrari F430. Not a big deal if you aren't a Ferrari fan; sacrilege if you are.

Shadow 7D
June 30, 2013, 04:24 AM
Caribou, on your wife's tattoo's did she get them the tradition way of sewing the skin with a wode/inked thread, cause if she did, props to her, that makes even me squeamish to think of it, stitches with Novocaine were bad enough.

Shadow 7D
June 30, 2013, 04:44 AM
Look at what the Army uses
honestly, it's pretty much the same tech,except for the sleeping bag (same as the rest, no special arctic bag, but if you are lucky you might get issued the arctic sleep ware)

There's a small stove in the squad tent, it's up the the squad if they want to run it all the time, honestly the tent isn't much more than what Caribou uses, except it sleeps more people, and they TRIED quite a few 'new and improved' except plasticized fabric BREAKS at low temps when oiled canvas or duck is just fine. And thinking of all the crawling around, makes me kinda jealous of Caribous setup. The sides of an arctic tent are NEVER staked, because the tent will burn down in seconds if it gets on fire so you train to roll out, bag and all.The biggest trick on the arctic tent is...Keep the roof low (all your heat rises and you sleep cold) and either make sure you have REALLY good drainage, or prepare your bed WAY before you get close to getting it toasty inside, did that ONCE, was there when it was done against better advice....
see you melt the snowpack and are left with mud, very cold wet get in everything mud, and it'll never dry out

Second thing on guns, esp. the M16/4 if it's hot, keep it hot, if it's cold, keep it cold, if it's gone from hot to cold, you need to shotgun it and clean the bolt and check for ice.

While I can't say 'this is why it won't work' I can tell you cleaning the bolt fixes it...
OH and I did something Caribou called me crazy for... shooting quals at -65... but then we weren't given much of a choice, and I have the lingering after effect of frost nip on my face to prove it.
And like Caribou said, shooting will all your layers on, and (in our case) a vest, makes it 'fun'

speaking of frost bite, hot tip, well 2 actually
Never touch freezing metal without a layer, much like the kid licking the flag poll... it instantly freezes your skin on contact... I could tell by a certain divot people acquired on that field exercise if they were left handed or right handed by which side of the nose it was on. (non military, one way of maintaining a consistent sight picture is by indexing your head position by placing the tip of your nose to the charging handle.)

Second, petroleum products, unlike water don't freeze (ok, so the paraffin - wax will solidify in some grades of diesel) this means spilling fuel on yourself is an emergency.

What did I learn, lots and while I had my doubts, the stuff taught by the army about extreme cold, works, when you are out and about for 12 hours a day that cold... and it's the little the little things that can mess you up, like me forgetting my beanie walking two blocks to motor pool cause it had warmed up to -34, and now I can tell when the temp is below 15*.... it makes my ears hurt. On a curious note, care to guess who the Army learned about cold weather survival from... yeah, the Alaska natives, one of the most effective arctic forces fielded was the Alaska Territorial Volunteers, made up of mostly natives and trappers.

Honestly, having experienced it, I respect the hell out of Caribou, and can tell you that there's a thousand little things that don't make it through, like what it feels like to take a piss with a bit of wind in extreme cold. Or having your coffee go cold in less than 5 minutes and crust over. You want to feel sorry for someone, feel sorry for the crew...

They say that you take 3 times as long to do something in deep cold. OH and batteries, they don't last.

Certaindeaf
June 30, 2013, 10:30 AM
I heard they use/d(?) nuclear batteries on landing strip lights in the very cold.

rodregier
June 30, 2013, 12:16 PM
Military ops in the extreme cold - the environment is at least as potent a force as any opposing enemy, and has to fought at least as hard :-(

FWIW, Manganese Dioxide (CR type) LiMnO2 batteries are rated down to -40C (-40F) operating temperature. Regular alkaline batteries are much less hardy.

MP-44
June 30, 2013, 12:23 PM
Great show. I was flipping through channels and caught Caribou & family fishing with the nets and have been hooked ever since. I also like the segments covering the trapper/hunter.

I hope there are many more seasons to come.

I do wish they would drop the lady at the "station". I think she could burn toast and make it seem like it was life or death. She gets old quick.

rodregier
June 30, 2013, 12:28 PM
BTW, Canada also has a volunteer force way up north also comprised of local natives, who also train Regular Forces on Arctic operations in the field.

http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/land-terre/cr-rc/index-eng.asp

harrygunner
June 30, 2013, 05:54 PM
I used to live in a town that appeared in many TV shows and movies. I'd get a kick out of seeing characters leave a building and by time they're on the road, they're actually miles away. Watched them film a couple of times. Bits of action edited together later.

So nice to see the treasure of Native Alaskan knowledge being passed on. And the awareness that everything is a renewable resource we depend on for our survival is so important. I'm reminded of that every time I'm in South Dakota in the middle of emptiness that used to hold millions of buffalo. Decimated in a little over a decade.

I've never appreciated subtle nuances of rifles being so critical for survival. Thanks for that as well.

This show has me considering an extended visit to Alaska so I can get some feel for its culture.

scaatylobo
July 1, 2013, 02:07 PM
Ok ,so last nights episode was THE bottom line as to her total lack of sense and skill,its amazing she can stay alive with her 'skills'.

First she went out to 'pull a sneak' on a snow covered flat ,WEARING BLACK !.

Then she goes out in some white,and no shot worth taking.

NEXT she goes out in black AGAIN,and gets within FIFTY YARDS and misses due to having gear that is not sighted in - REALLY ?.

The rest of the show and the people [ minus Eriks silliness at crashing ] are truly interesting and very resourceful .

Back to Sue,she actually has apples and real food supplys that others would kill for,and they call her part of this show = NOT IN MY OPINION.

She could star in a version called "mild Alaska,almost wild".

Cosmoline
July 1, 2013, 03:08 PM
"Mild Alaska" is the name of my own reality TV show. Viewers get to watch me pedal around getting loads at Costco. Thrill to next week's show as I cruise the local Saturday markets and buy fresh spinach from the Lutherans. There's a moose, but he just stands there looking at me while chewing on things.

John3921
July 1, 2013, 04:06 PM
lobo - that was comical. OTOH - with the miracle of film and editing it's hard to believe any of that happened in the exact sequence shown. Sneaking up on a flock of anything with a camera man or three in tow seems unlikely. I'd think if she really wanted to whack a ptarmigan she'd have herself a small blind set up somewhere and pick the little buggers off.

Agnes is shown missing a lot of shots too - I suspect the reality might be a little different than what you see on the idjot box.

rcmodel
July 1, 2013, 04:20 PM
Sue showed a total lack of respect for the Ptarmigan she killed too.

First, calling them several names that were totally inappropriate.

Then 'breasting' it and leaving the wing and leg meat for the varmints to eat.

rc

caribou
July 1, 2013, 04:42 PM
Hunting and dragging along a camera crew is VERY difficult.

I didn't get to see last nights show, but a youtube caribou hunt instead (OK, more like I settled for it)

We found that as long as we acted like a bunch of grazing Caribou, the group as a whole could get fairly close, but the camera itself had the Caribou up and alert by 200 yards. Funny too, Agnes did miss, but then again, we all miss sometimes, but with scenes blended from catching three Caribou into catching the first one that day, its because they needed film from various angles and such. One camera isn't much. The tip off is that Agnes has her white ski mask, then her black one. Indeed, over the course of the day she missed a couple times, but not three times at one animal ~~LOL!!~~
One scene I caught a glimps of was a Caribou dropped in its tracks when hit, but when I walked up and went to cut the throat, as we do on all of them to bleed out what we can, it was quite alive, and when it stood up, I did what you can call "kosher" and used what was litterally in my hand. Usually we just shoot them in the head again, if in such a condition. So there I am, knife in hand and blood on my leg telling Agnes "Well , we aint gonna catch them" ~~LOL!!~~ as a group that was approaching caught our wind, yet its edited in as me and her still chaseing them......~~LOL!!~~

Those edits are the 5% I see that's used to fill in seconds. The rest is pretty much what was happening, just condensed. Thats where most of the story gets lost, condensing, and yet trying to make it presentable.........so the editors do have quite a job.

A BS story would have us do little to nothing in the 12 or so minutes we get each episode. Soon, you'll see alotta other things we do to make a living, such as firewood, boat building, sled making, fishing, arts and crafts and such.

bassdogs
July 1, 2013, 05:07 PM
Bou - This is a little off topic, but as an addict to the many Alaska related reality shows, I have often wondered how health care happens there. As shown in the Coast Guard Ak, people with grave injuries or illnesses out in the bush or remote villages are evacuated by heli or what ever means is necessary to get the patient somewhere for "a higher level of care". Do people have health insurance? I understand that you don't run to a doc everytime you cut yourself or get a nasty bump on your noggin, but there must be cases when that 'higher level of care" is needed. This is not intended to be a personal [just you] question, but rather the norm for people living in the bush or one of the remote villages.

Shadow 7D
July 1, 2013, 06:17 PM
There's a pretty developed system...
BUT to go to the doctor, for some, might involved chartering a bush pilot and a flight of 200+ miles.

I have a highschool classmate (from Paradise CA.) who is a flight nurse for Guardian Flight http://www.guardianflight.com/ actually bumped into him at Costco

Yeah, they can get you to the hospital, and they have stuff that can get to most developed airstrips... but, well you probably don't want to know what that flight will cost you. The NG and reserves hospital/medical units mobilize for 2 weeks, and provide free clinics to remote villages. And most of the major native corporations have hospitals or clinics in their regional hubs.

Sheepdog1968
July 1, 2013, 11:14 PM
Caribou, what kind of Internet connection do you have up there?

caribou
July 1, 2013, 11:40 PM
I have an internet connection via our local telephone co-op. Most have gone to satalite dishes, and I plan one soon, 4 gig them there......were always trying to improve things here, in ol'2013 :D

As for health care......wellllllllllllllllllll Alaska wasn't conquord like the lower 48 and its Native tribes weren't subjugated and imprisoned on Reservations and such, but it took till 1924 for them to legally own land or vote, ect. By Statehood they lawsuited up and in 1971 the state, Natives, Feds and private individuls were settled for ownership of lands and compensations, as the local tribes proved to be the original occupiers, and that in 1867 the US bought the rights to govern, Tax and protect the lands here, not "Own" them as some implied.
The Native Corperations were formed to manage these lands and this corp did well; they developed RedDog Mine and the corp pays 94% of the boroughs taxes that fund our schools, trails, and such.
They also dumped the unweildy Indian Health Service, for the most part and formed their own non profit health corp "Maniilaq association" and trained locals as Aids and nurses. The clinic in each village will keep you alive until a life flight, no helocopters, gets you to Anchorage. Kotzebue has a large clinic, with alotta social services therem, as well as a couple real doctors, but no surgery or such. Someday, maybe. The dental services are much iimproved in the last 20 years as well, with no more just pulling teeth.

I have no health insurance, and once broke my right forarm, snapped it straight and slung it, 4 months later, I was just fine. "But" I also had alotta training, and have helped many people from as an EMT and a with basic first aid, as well as attended a couple deaths. No fun.

Live healthy, eat healthy, exercise and be carefull, its the accidents that will get ya........

lloveless
July 2, 2013, 01:34 PM
Caribou, thanks to you and your family for sharing your way of life. I am a travel nurse and spent 13 weeks March-July 2010 in Kotzebue. Never got to Kobuk, but did fly into and out of Kivilina. I really appreciate the Inupiat culture.
ll

Certaindeaf
July 2, 2013, 02:14 PM
Sue showed a total lack of respect for the Ptarmigan she killed too.

First, calling them several names that were totally inappropriate.

Then 'breasting' it and leaving the wing and leg meat for the varmints to eat.

rc
I didn't get to see that episode yet. I saw one episode where that younger guy shot two and did that also, keeping the other parts for trap bait.
I would have plucked that thing in a few seconds.. the skin is the best part.

DM~
July 2, 2013, 06:54 PM
At first she said she wanted to make soup, she thew away the BEST part for soup!

Too dang lazy to clean it "properly", she could have had both, fried breast AND soup!!

I've cleaned and ate hundreds of those things!

DM

Carl N. Brown
July 2, 2013, 08:05 PM
In regard to plentiful small game, I can think of reasons to leave unwanted scraps in the wild (including sharing with other predators far away from the dwelling so maybe they are less like to come foraging closer to home) and taking the best parts home.

Subsistence hunters (like my relatives in the mountains) are not always as dainty as I was taught about sports hunting growing up in the city. My father was mountain born and raised but settled in the city when he came home from WWII.

Cosmoline
July 2, 2013, 08:53 PM
First, calling them several names that were totally inappropriate.

I haven't seen this show, but it's not unusual to call them stupid chickens. Because they just stand there looking at you.

Then 'breasting' it and leaving the wing and leg meat for the varmints to eat.

Ptarmingan leg meat? Never even tried to deal with that. It's all sinew on the ones I've shot. The big red breasts are where it's at. Maybe the ones elsewhere have bigger legs or something.

http://www.alaskapublic.org/2012/11/02/hunting-alaskas-wild-chickens/

rcmodel
July 2, 2013, 08:56 PM
Much worse then that.

I do believe they beeped out a couple of words, and the ones they let by?

I can't use the milder words Sue used for them on THR without getting an infraction.

As for stupid chicken?
Well, most of them were a heck of a lot smarter then Sue was I guess.

rc

Cosmoline
July 2, 2013, 09:03 PM
Well that is odd. I've never cursed ptarmigan or grouse. I think this person may just be a little bit crazy.

rcmodel
July 2, 2013, 09:06 PM
Just a rough gruff sad old lady that has lived alone in the artic for too long.

But it seems to me that is probably why she went there alone when she was young in the first place??

rc

rcmodel
July 2, 2013, 09:16 PM
Ptarmingan leg meat? Never even tried to deal with that.Me neither.
I've never even seen one, let alone ate one.

But they can't be all that much different then Prairie Chicken, Pheasant, and Grouse.

She wanted something to eat, and it could have been cleaned properly, 'breasted' for frying, and the rest boiled down into meat & broth, and consumed.
I bet it would have been pretty good stuff too!

Feed the bones to the pet foxes!

rc

xxjumbojimboxx
July 3, 2013, 02:21 AM
Sue showed a total lack of respect for the Ptarmigan she killed too.

First, calling them several names that were totally inappropriate.

Then 'breasting' it and leaving the wing and leg meat for the varmints to eat.

rc
I don't think she was being disrespectful to the animal....uh.. on purpose.... I sort of think that she called them little somethinorothers in the same regard that a mechanic would say something like that to a stuck screw... You know.. like pain in the butt type scenario. I really think a hunter respecting an animal is more about appreciation for what that animal has provided, and the life its given to do so. I don't really think calling it names that it doesn't even understand, before you've killed it, is disrespectful.

caribou
July 3, 2013, 03:46 AM
I personally pluck them. A couple quick pulls and all the important stuff is off and the skin on keeps what fat they have on while it slow bakes or stew. Mmmmmmm.....the wife even boils water and we dip the ingaluak in for a couple seconds and then straight down the gullet. They don't have muckh for wings or legs and alotta trappers will only brest them, as its a legal bait that is effective. The tail feathers are white with black tips, and sicne they are not migratory water fowl, we can sell the feathers in art work and such that other wild feathers would land us in jail for.....

Anyways, Dang, we just watched the show, ~~LOL!!~~ You tube....Surely got a laugh when I got unstuck, came to a halt and jumped off the ride to make a snow angel, something my kids love me to do, when we take them slideing and such. Also, we definitely wernt only 60 miles from Noorvik, it was 60-80 from Deering, which is 130 miles from Noorvik, but oh well...the rest was pretty much true, Im actually hopeing they will show that we came across our oldest son, who had fallen behind after we started filming, to avoid being in frame, with three Caribou to work when we were going back that day, they should have included that, but maybe next time? I liked it, this episode, was quite entertaining......oh, they left out use stuffing plastic bag material into the gas can crack with a willow stick ~~LOL!!~~

Bull Nutria
July 3, 2013, 07:37 AM
I know gas is expensive, do you use known trails or landmarks to navigate? It sure looks like on tv that you are striking out across open country. I use a gps to navigate in open water where i can go point to point this saves fuel. i realize there maybe obstacles on your route that you have to go around like soft snow banks,rocks etc. Question is would a GPS save you on gas?

Could you have turned that leaky gas drum on its end verticle to keep the gas from dripping out.(probably unstable on your sled--but you could have lashed it down with your ropes etc) I did notice the plastic bag pressed into the crack on the drum on the show.

If I could vote people off the show I would vote off Sue and the dog team couple. the trapper guy really narrates well , however i think they are missing the best part by not featuring much more you and Agnes in your daily lives!!

Bull

scaatylobo
July 3, 2013, 02:47 PM
I totally agree with your last post.

Sue is nothing but a point of irritation to me,and I don't see her as having ANYTHING to do with the title of the show !.

Compared to ALL the rest of those featured on the show ,it appears as if she has more gear & food etc than all the rest put together.

bassdogs
July 4, 2013, 10:06 AM
Have to agree. A quick field dressing for small game is typical. Step on the wings, similiar method [w/o wings] for skinning a rabbit. Calling something a "crude" name is kind of typical. That SOB or POS rabbit.

Can we move on from the bash Sue stuff on this thread. I suspect by now that everyone has had a chance to express their feelings. I think it is putting Bou in alkward position as it would be inappropriate for him to make negative comments or otherwise about a fellow cast member. I am appreciative of all the info he has been willing to share with us. Am hoping that he doesn't grow tired of responding. Thanks Bou.

Goblin
July 4, 2013, 06:37 PM
hey Caribou

Love that show...Do u get to meet any of the other cast members?

scaatylobo
July 4, 2013, 08:37 PM
Sorry if y'all got twisted undies about some of my comments.

I was not under the impression that the title of this thread was CARIBOU.

I thought it was about the whole show,and I would not expect him - nor ask in any way for Caribou to comment about my thoughts or comments.

Unless they were directed at him,or about him.

And since the show FEATURES Sue and wasted so much camera time on her,I felt I was spot on making comment.

I am done with her after that last debacle of her "hunting".

caribou
July 4, 2013, 11:19 PM
Theres no rule that says we or anyone have to like folks on the show. I have never met Sue, but I must say, that that's probly how she actually lives. Im waiting to see her in the summer, I bet she gets busy. She is tendeing her business and shows how she makes $$ and pays for it all by then.
We haven't met or talked with any other folks on the show, but have worked with those who have worked with them.

As for navagating, well nothing that requires batteries helps. A compass and knowlage of the land /ice are the main ways of staying where you wanna be. We do use a Trail system, with willow wands marking routs between villages, but we use them to get to a point and then its all X country from there and back to a know , packed, easily driven trail. Often, after hunting and with a full load we haed to the nearest point on a trail we have going for us, and get there. Saves gas and helps when the load is big or part of it remains behind and such. As well, folks can track you if your known to leave land or go up a ridge at a certain point, yours'll be the only tracks going that way.

I oersonally do not berate food Im hunting, seems odd thing to do...., though I DO eat Beef and only because I Hate Cows.....:D ~~LOL!!~~

xxjumbojimboxx
July 5, 2013, 12:29 AM
I oersonally do not berate food Im hunting, seems odd thing to do...., though I DO eat Beef and only because I Hate Cows.....:D ~~LOL!!~~

Hah! Hilarious..

Im from Massachusetts, Where everything is berated.. Constantly... Sarcasm and ball busting is performed in ways that would be a common source of fist fights down here in texas... I used to joke around back home, and in a southern accent say "them's fightin words"... Heh at the time I didn't realize was actually true in most of the country.

scaatylobo
July 5, 2013, 08:53 AM
I am curious as to how it feels to be a 'celebrity' .

After all you are watched by a 'few thousand' at the very least,so we kind of know you and your family.

Has it effected your life yet and if not yet,are you ready for being a celebrity if that should arise ?.

We all on here would recognize you if we saw you,so imagine that many more will.

Do you even travel to other states .

bassdogs
July 5, 2013, 05:19 PM
Celebrity status? Good question. Have seen or heard about characters on some of the other shows who grow weary of the cameras and loss of a "life" after a season or two. The father / owner in Air Alaska is an example. Part of it I think was the pressure of running a business and wanting to enjoy his senior years. I did read though that the youngest daughter had to talk him into doing the show in the first place. I live in the next county over where the Backyard Gold show is filmed and have crossed paths with a couple of the lead characters. They are yumming up the attention for now, but well see in the long run. People around here are pretty private with their lives. Personally my life would never attract any ones attention, but can't imagine what it would be like everytime I opened the back door to go outside and Pee.

caribou
July 5, 2013, 08:10 PM
I live here in a small village in the Arctic, and belive me, theres no fan club :D

I went back to Montana to see my dad before he passed away, let my wife meet him, that's about all the lower 48 I cared to see again.

Most all the town is as normal about me and our doings, as they see the work in progress.

This here internet and on only a couple sites do I write or even get 'fan mail', so its easy to keep up on.

Season 2 might arise, and its no loss of life here for us, we simply do as we do, amnd if they cant get it, we just keep on truckin', or it wouldn't be real, and were not paid to act.

The money anit great at all, so I aint gettin' rich. We actually made less $$ this year, but that's because of other troubles that will soon bring all that money back.

Bull Nutria
July 6, 2013, 08:38 AM
well you have a fan club on THR!! I have been reading the posts many THR members are watching you with great interest, envy, and enjoyment.

You say you are not paid to act, that is a good thing and makes the show REAL--most "reality shows are obviously scripted and come across a bogus BS with fake crisis situations etc. You and Agnes are just doing your thing and these camera guys are following along(mostly getting in your way I'm sure).

I enjoy the parts where you guys are sighting in the seal rifle, i'd like to see you guys do more shooting with your other firearms, a "show and tell' on your gun collection would be interesting also.

I don't understand why they would not pay you well for puttng up with all this camera man humbug? Well i suggest that you work in some free adds for your wife and daughters fur clothing sales and anything else you make for sale. You gotta get something worthwhile out this hassle!

Keep on doing your thing it comes across very naturally and sincerely.

good luck ,

Bull

scaatylobo
July 7, 2013, 10:18 AM
I think its sad they don't pay you well for the intrusions and their hampering of your hunts etc.

And yes,you have a real fan club that totally enjoys have real time feedback with a celebrity.

caribou
July 7, 2013, 04:40 PM
From my understanding, no one gets paid well 'untill' season 2......then things 'might' get better. I think its a weeding out process, as well as getting things set up and see if they are "do-able"

Im glad you fellas, and gals, like it :D Ill be doing my best, and , of course, Ill post here :D

Malamute
July 7, 2013, 10:12 PM
Hey Caribou! Been watching this thread, and the one going on bushcraftusa. I've watched a bit, but havent been able to see much yet. Maybe when work slows down a little! Looks like a cool show, nice to see the footage of you and the family out making a living!

homers
July 7, 2013, 10:39 PM
Caribou,

What do you do for internet access?

lhartman89
July 8, 2013, 02:40 AM
I haven't posted in this thread yet, but I want to start off by saying I have been watching the show and like it a lot. One thing I wanted to say/ask is that I heard it is cheap for them to film in Alaska. I've noticed lately that they have been playing a lot of different shows that are filmed in Alaska. I am guessing because it is cheap? I hope they do another season of Life Below Zero. I do like watching you and you wife hunt and seeing the way you live. I gotta say that I am a city slicker and don't know if I could do the things you do. Thank you for taking the time to talk to us all here and I hope to see more about your families ways.

caribou
July 8, 2013, 08:40 AM
Here in Noorvik, Im on the Phone exchange line, for internet. Theres small satalite dishes as an option , too.

I think the companys get to get a big tax break when they produce here, but the cost of producing here, according to several different sources is almost triple what it would cost in California. They need the tax break so's they can operate.

Shuks, they encounterd 8.65$ a gallon gasoline in Kotzebue while following the wife on a Seal hunt, 100 gallons at a time, between two boats and the open Ocean. Things take 5-7 days to get here, express(!!), and they often think they can have their Starbucks hot,~~LOL!!!~~ or something from down the road. Its funny when they have to explain to someone in LA that theres no hardwhere store down the road that dosent exist :cuss: They were shocked when no one would rent them a boat, because everyone uses theirs, and not for recreation, there were no spare, unoccupied houses to rent or that at -40 its pretty tough on people who have never been that cold or rode 120 miles for their first ride , ever, on a snowmachine.

Yaaaaaaaaaaaa, learning curve :D

hso
July 8, 2013, 08:54 AM
Time for me to play the mean ol' moderator and ask everyone to stay focused on the firearms related topics and drop the drama around "Sue" (some of you are beginning to sound like a bunch of old gossips around the bingo table). Remember that this is a TV show and caribou is kind enough to explain what his and his family's experience is like, but that luxury isn't extended to the other participants in the show.

bassdogs
July 8, 2013, 09:11 AM
OK a firearms question. Bou, it seems that your wife does all the shooting. Don't you also carry a firearm? Does her native status give here hunting access that you don't have as a non-native? How many caribou can you take on a hunt like the current one?

rcmodel
July 8, 2013, 12:53 PM
I watched last night and one very odd thing that struck me was a bunch of flies buzzing around in the window of the little hunting shack.

How the heck do they survive in sub-zero weather when nobody is there to heat and cook for them??

rc

Dr T
July 8, 2013, 01:59 PM
To help focus this a bit more on topic:

One thing I have wondered about is the cleaning and maintenance of the firearms used in the Arctic. You encounter cold, blowing snow, and ice in the winter (and sometimes in the summer), and in the summer it really looks a lot like a marshy swamp.

How often do you clean the rifles and what do you use for bore cleaner and lubricant?

Another question: What types of firearms win the Darwin Award for things that DO NOT work well enough to keep around?

scaatylobo
July 9, 2013, 01:38 PM
Guess I gotta leave this thread as I was under the false impression it was about the TV show and not about only one member of that show.

BUT as a parting shot I was hysterical after watching SUE on this last show --- fact is I turned it off after her second appearance since it was too sad to watch her whispering to the camera man [ woman ? ] about the "critters out to get her" :banghead:.

ghitch75
July 10, 2013, 09:22 AM
I watched last night and one very odd thing that struck me was a bunch of flies buzzing around in the window of the little hunting shack.

How the heck do they survive in sub-zero weather when nobody is there to heat and cook for them??


i do HVAC and Refrigeration work......flys can seem to stay froze for a long time and when they warm up they come back to life...don't ask me how or why they just do...

DM~
July 10, 2013, 09:39 AM
Yeaaa, when i was a kid, i'd catch all kinds of insects in the summer, freeze them and use them for fishing later... They have some kind of antifreeze in them.

DM

jim in Anchorage
July 10, 2013, 05:09 PM
Maybe this thread should go to hunting?

caribou
July 13, 2013, 05:00 AM
Heres a teaser for sunday, and if you keep up with me on the Hunting forum , youll know how this episode ends :D

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/life-below-zero/videos/the-chase/

As to guns; Winter its clean, lube, wipe off lube. In summer, is clean, lube, slather even more for rain, salt water spray and such.
it is very swampy, about 2 feet and its solid ice, so the water go's nowhere.

If you want gun problems and drama, buy an AR.

You want all around utility, a Mini14 is most poular, followed by AK's, then Milsurps and Winchester M70's/Rem 700's

For .22 Winchesters, Rugers, and Marlins rule.

Shadow 7D
July 13, 2013, 06:22 AM
He he he
Hey, a AR will work 4 months out of the year....

I'll keep you in mind, if you check the Anchorage PD, and the Fairbanks PD, they get SS mini's pretty often, you can check the 'advertised' property to see some of what's going up on auction for the next round.

You forgot Nylons, except the stocks can't take abuse in the cold.

BBQLS1
July 13, 2013, 09:51 AM
I'm enjoying the show. I hadn't been on this forum as much lately, and only found out about the show by accident(no cable tv at home). I was out of town watching tv in a hotel and recognized Agnes (her tattoo) from what caribou had posted well before the show was around.

I was kind of surprised to see an AR out there.

scaatylobo
July 13, 2013, 01:01 PM
Funny that at least one of the partys followed on this show uses an AR/M-4 platform.

And he seems to be well off and well stocked,have not seen him use a different rifle yet [ Erick ].

I do not for a NY second believe the AR/M-4 is the best for anything,BUT at the same time I own and shoot them often and in 40 years have not had an issue yet.

I do own more than a few other makes and calibers ,and I do not like the AR platform in .308/7.62X51 as its too heavy for me.

I do own and shoot a M-1A,civilian model and even that is heavy.

But I find it amusing that so many have a Love/Hate relationship with AR's and Glocks.

They are a tool and if you don't like um,thats understood.BUT ranting about how terrible they are is silly.

In my not so humble opinion.

Wish we could get Ericks feedback on his AR/M-4.

Queen_of_Thunder
July 13, 2013, 03:16 PM
Some of the shows that take place in Alaska show people with AR's as their long gun. As to stocks all I can say is nothing works well @ 30,40 or 60 degrees below zero. Cold is hard on everything though some stuff will break before other stuff. Anyway these days if its over 80 its too hot and if its under 80 its too cold. So its an indoor range for me these days where an AR works just fine as does a Glock. Now if only my 10 mm would show up.

Rush_Fan
July 13, 2013, 07:03 PM
Caribou, I saw the show yesterday for the first time and watched 3 re-run episodes. I liked the lack of hyped-up drama I see on other shows like "Mountain Men."
Anyway, I didn't understand why it is necessary (or preferable) to dip the fish in seal oil. I understand if the fish has no fat and provides only protein, like rabbits do, the need for added fat in your diet. On the show it was said that eating frozen fish cools your body temperature. Do you not thaw the fish and cook it before eating it, or is it eaten frozen?
On the show, Erick had a misfire with his AR-15 while hunting caribou, apparently because the firing pin was frozen or lube had frozen. Do you use any cold-weather lubricants in your bolt action rifles, or do you run them dry?
Are .30-30 lever action rifles (Marlin 336 and Winchester 94) popular among Native Alaskans for hunting, or are they "not enough gun" for the large game in Alaska?
Finally, I know revolvers like Ruger .44 Magnums and others are popular in Alaska. How popular/common are Glock pistols in .40, .45, and 10mm? Thanks in advance for your answers. Enjoying the show!

jim in Anchorage
July 14, 2013, 12:35 AM
Funny that at least one of the partys followed on this show uses an AR/M-4 platform.

And he seems to be well off and well stocked,have not seen him use a different rifle yet [ Erick ].

I do not for a NY second believe the AR/M-4 is the best for anything,BUT at the same time I own and shoot them often and in 40 years have not had an issue yet.

I do own more than a few other makes and calibers ,and I do not like the AR platform in .308/7.62X51 as its too heavy for me.

I do own and shoot a M-1A,civilian model and even that is heavy.

But I find it amusing that so many have a Love/Hate relationship with AR's and Glocks.

They are a tool and if you don't like um,thats understood.BUT ranting about how terrible they are is silly.

In my not so humble opinion.

Wish we could get Ericks feedback on his AR/M-4.
His AR failed in E1. To cold for it.

Carne Frio
July 14, 2013, 12:54 AM
"Anyway, I didn't understand why it is necessary (or preferable) to dip the fish in seal oil. I understand if the fish has no fat and provides only protein, like rabbits do, the need for added fat in your diet. On the show it was said that eating frozen fish cools your body temperature. Do you not thaw the fish and cook it before eating it, or is it eaten frozen?"

Locals who live on the west and north coast
like spears of frozen whitefish, dipped in seal
oil because it tastes great. Calories from fat
are also needed for those who spend much time
out in the cold.

caribou
July 14, 2013, 01:26 AM
Also, if you stay outside al the dooda day, theres little chances of building a fire out on the ice, or in a storm or such.
Dipping the frozen fish/Caribou/meats into the oil is basicly a caloric way of cooking it (in a sense) as its better to ingest the calories eating it with the frozen foods than to burn the oil to cook anything.

Often we are out for days, and often we have no fire at all, just enough to make coffee and tea.

When you walk and carry all you own, a stove isn't light, either, nor is there always fuel around to cook with.

when everything is -20, including the food in your pack, carrying Seal oil is the difference between going home to eat and sleep and actually being out there, as a Hunter/Gather'r/Fisher would.

scaatylobo
July 14, 2013, 09:33 AM
You stated that a stove is heavy,I am under the impression that you go out with either a dog sled or a machine.
That would mean to me that the weight of a small stove would be easy to handle IF your not humping it on your person.
Did I miss something ?,thank for your responses as it gives us all a 'feel' for your life ==== without all the cold and terrible conditions you endure :D.

gym
July 14, 2013, 09:58 AM
Amazing, I am really impressed at the way you live your lives. It's something all people should see. Only wish I tolerated the cold better.

Rush_Fan
July 14, 2013, 11:39 AM
Caribou and Carne Frio, thanks for the replies.

caribou
July 14, 2013, 07:15 PM
Stoves die while bumping along in a sled behind a Snow machine, as well as they are better suited to stay where the tent is, or shelter cabin, while hunting, so yes, we do have them, but we don't take them everywhere. we do, however take a metal canteen, metal cup, bowl or coffee pot to melt water, as thirst is the bane of the Arctic.I carry a Swedish canteen in my inner jacket parka and when Im 1/2 done, I pack course ice and snow into replace the water I drank and get to meltingthat for the next break. We carry thermos's too, but mostly they stay in camp if were walking and such. Sweet Tea is a favorite.
A guy breaks down and walks, or go's ice fishing, or just hunting on foot or cutting wood, or any situation where a fire isn't feasible, carrying seal oil and having a frozen lunch is doable at -40. Warms you right up.

100 years ago there were no little stove to take along in regular use, besides it takes good :D

gym
July 15, 2013, 11:37 AM
Do you carry a 44 Magnum also when just walking around your home? Are other calibers other than 22 still useful in the handgun are, or is it strictly large caliber handguns with a longer sight radius, "I would think that a glock 26 , "type handgun", is useless for your needs" and large caliber rifles would be the rule of thumb. Will a 308 or a 30-06 do the job for you, I noticed a mosin and several AK's on the few episodes I watched. I would have thought the AK was a shorter range weapon than desired for most chores. How about a slug gun in 12 gauge, with some birdshot for the occasional Grouse?
How much does it cost you per month to heat your home? Does everyone use dogs, or are some more into tracked vehicles, like snow mobiles? I would think that a few dogs are necessary for guard duty and companionship if not for sled use? Very interesting show, hope they make it worth your while in the second season.

BBQLS1
July 15, 2013, 01:15 PM
Do you carry a 44 Magnum also when just walking around your home? Are other calibers other than 22 still useful in the handgun are, or is it strictly large caliber handguns with a longer sight radius, "I would think that a glock 26 , "type handgun", is useless for your needs" and large caliber rifles would be the rule of thumb. Will a 308 or a 30-06 do the job for you, I noticed a mosin and several AK's on the few episodes I watched. I would have thought the AK was a shorter range weapon than desired for most chores. How about a slug gun in 12 gauge, with some birdshot for the occasional Grouse?
How much does it cost you per month to heat your home? Does everyone use dogs, or are some more into tracked vehicles, like snow mobiles? I would think that a few dogs are necessary for guard duty and companionship if not for sled use? Very interesting show, hope they make it worth your while in the second season.

I'm thinking many of your questions are answered in this thread.

krupparms
July 15, 2013, 02:04 PM
Wow! Just watched 1st. show last nite. Great shooting on that wolf by your wife. Love show so far, will be watching &catching up on reruns. Good luck to you & your family.

gym
July 15, 2013, 11:49 PM
That's possible, but I didn't read 192 posts.

caribou
July 17, 2013, 08:02 AM
No, I , nor any of my family carry a pistol of any kind around the house.
'Have pistol, will travel' is good when you stick to a trail in Winter, going from village to village, but Hunting requires a rifle, the openness of the country makes it so and up this way, with 3 kinds of Bears, and extra weight is just that, most all guys I know use a Rifle as their Bear Pistol.
Women do most pistol packing, as they cut fish , pick berrys, are busy looking and using both hands or such that involves things Bears eat, or frequent, and the pistols I know of having been used were all fired in the air apon seeing that Bear, and all Bears exited stage left.

The Aks I see around are mostly .223, and each guy has his favorite caliber or rifle,Ruger Mini-14s are very popular too, though Ive never owned one, I see em lots....but any accurate rifle could be in 30-06 to .22, but Ive seen absolutely no short magnums or any kinda magnum except .22WMR......ammunition for odd calibers is hard to come by, with .223, .243w, .308, .270, and 30-06 being most common.

Dr T
July 17, 2013, 10:51 AM
I one read many years ago that 22 Hornets were favored many hunters since the ammo is light and it had enough punch use on game by a careful hunter. Has its use died out with the coming of easily available 223?

scaatylobo
July 17, 2013, 01:02 PM
So it sounds like those here that are nay saying the M-4's are not exactly on board with those actually in the bush with them,IF as you state that the ammunition for them is one of the prime rounds in country ?.

I would NOT choose that as a primary in that AO, but I am curious to see that it seems many do.

Interesting to read from you that the handgun is not very popular among your friends,we are told it is a perfect gun in that AO as its handy.

I do agree that the rifle is THE best to have at hand,but there are times a man has to be in an ----- er --- awkward position and the pistol is the only thing that might be useful.

huntsman
July 17, 2013, 01:22 PM
Great show, really done well. Some action junkies may find it boring but I liked the format and I liked the fact that it shows different folk in different situations pursuing man's common needs, food and money ;)

3D's
July 17, 2013, 03:55 PM
I found this site via a thread I started at another site concerning your show.
I spent 4 days in Anchorage on my way to another country many, many years ago and always wanted to go back and never did and probably won't. Watching your show and that of the Alaskan State Troopers has allowed me to see what I never got to see in person. Thanks to you and the others for bringing us into your lives.

caribou
July 17, 2013, 07:24 PM
The .223 is an excellent cartridge, and very highly praised here as an accurate killing round. M4/M16 type platforms are not.
There are those that buy them, have them, and there are those that buy them, use them, then sell them, ..........as its pretty much necessary to carry a gun that works in all climates and weathers. I know of two 'owned to the 6th degree" AR's in this village. Great summer guns, but not Winter guns.
I think the NG 5th Eskimo Scout Battalion in Kotz still issues M14's.

The availability of .223 in bulk is another reason its popular, as alotta Alaskan's bulk buy food, fuel, ammo. "Sporting" rounds are near 40$-60$ for 20 right now, ammo prices are frikkin' scary, so a bunch at once is best.

Thankfully, we can show village life WAY BETTERR than the Nat Geo AST. AK Troopers show a biased view of village life, 99% bad, and that's why a Trooper is there. Were trying to show the best we can, and what is common here, in our lives.

3D's
July 18, 2013, 09:06 AM
Yes, I understand where you are coming from but I was referring to the scenery, not the people that the troopers interact with. I was 19 years old when I was in Anchorage, and the people I met during those 4 days have left an everlasting impression upon me. They were as far from those the AST program deals with as can be. The hospitality and respect shown to me has never been forgotten.

Agsalaska
July 19, 2013, 12:55 AM
The AR15 comments do not surprise me at all. You know the two happiest days of a boat owner are the day they buy it and the day they sell it. I heard that applied up to AR's in Alaska too(not counting of course the city dwellers, like me). I remember some really crazy guns though coming in from the villages. I always wished I could here a few of there stories. I dig the Mosin too. We kept one around too when I was in Alaska. I still have it but lost the bolt.


Cool show by the way.

Grassman
July 19, 2013, 08:18 AM
I like the show, tells the story of just how self reliant the people are, they don't complain, they just do it. We are losing that these days.

scaatylobo
July 19, 2013, 08:32 AM
Caribou.

Thanks for clarifying the comment about the 5.56 being a popular round.

I would not take any such caliber if I were heading your way,NOTHING smaller than .30 caliber.

But the reason for using that round makes sense if your doing lots of game killing and need cheap ammo,I shoot a Mossberg MVP in 5.56 and with 69 grain match its a killer on anything that caliber can stop.

And hell yes to the Mosin's as I own 2 and they are great guns and the price was WELL worth it.

skoro
July 19, 2013, 10:40 AM
Mark me down as another who enjoys this program. I don't catch every episode, but I see most of 'em.

Good stuff.

gym
July 19, 2013, 11:07 AM
I feel that if you can get any semi auto rifle in the preferred caliber to run right in the cold, you are better off than the time it takes to reset for a second or third shot with a bolt gun.
It more than compensates for the accuracy when dinner is at stake and you spend your whole day stalking these animals for 1 shot.
Fumbling with a frozen bolt is a waste of time and can ruin the whole hunt. Having seen Agnes have trouble ejecting a round it would be much easier to be able to fire a second or third shot without having to reset each time.
I have been watching and taping when I am unable to watch. That Sue is a darn bit smarter than I first thought, and handy with mechanical equipment, my wife has problems with the vacuum.

don quixote
July 19, 2013, 01:49 PM
First off... Agnes is a badass. I love the show.

I only have 1 gripe with the show and that is some of the editing. It appears as if they try to give a dark, sinister mood. Some of the lighting they use when they film the dead fish or cleaning of the game is like they are trying to make a horror movie.

gym
July 19, 2013, 01:59 PM
I didn't like the part where they showed the wolverine in the trap, and being shot. I know it is the right way to end him, but it kind of ruined the show for me.
Can't help it, I guess it's hypocritical being that I eat meat and all, but watching them suffer is bad Karma.
Out of all of the folks on the show, I find that Wiseman, "hope the spelling is properly". stands out the most, in the sense that at his age, he should, "regardless of his love of nature", have more of a social life. The isolation of being alone most all of the time is not healthy for a young man.
Not that it's any of my business, but it exhibits anti social behavior to a degree that may become problematic down the road. We are social animals, and need to interact with each other on a regular basis. It seems like escape is a priority for him in his life, the companionship of other Humans is essential for a balanced mental state. Even if it's occasional. Perhaps we will see some more interaction as the show progresses. I would wish him well and urge him to spend more time in social settings, like perhaps with this new exposure, " dating online", having a young lady who I am sure would love to come there for a week and spend some time with him.
Although off topic it does come as a concern for my fellow man, being they have opened their life up for scrutiny.
I retrospect to what Don ,"above" said, I agree, all that's missing is the organ music. These cliff hangers end up being a simple fix, understandably to keep you watching, although unnecessary.

Stevie-Ray
July 19, 2013, 04:00 PM
Interesting. I've just set up my DVR to record many episodes that are being rebroadcast Sunday. I love seeing shows about Alaska.

Agsalaska
July 19, 2013, 04:11 PM
I feel that if you can get any semi auto rifle in the preferred caliber to run right in the cold, you are better off than the time it takes to reset for a second or third shot with a bolt gun.
It more than compensates for the accuracy when dinner is at stake and you spend your whole day stalking these animals for 1 shot.
Fumbling with a frozen bolt is a waste of time and can ruin the whole hunt. Having seen Agnes have trouble ejecting a round it would be much easier to be able to fire a second or third shot without having to reset each time.
I have been watching and taping when I am unable to watch. That Sue is a darn bit smarter than I first thought, and handy with mechanical equipment, my wife has problems with the vacuum.
I agree in theory. But in reality I think those guns take far more abuse than most semi autos are designed to take. Remember you are in an environment where the less maintenance the better due to time, money, parts, etc. You dont have time to screw with it. You cant take the risk of it screwing up. You cant get parts if it does screw up. You have too many other things to do than worry about the gun. It is going to get wet, frozen, muddy, snowy, dropped, banged, dinged, and everything else on a regular basis. I can totally understand why Agnes uses a Mosin Nagant. It is quite possibly the perfect gun for her circumstances.

gym
July 19, 2013, 05:23 PM
If you guys have "on demand" there are a dozen episodes online.

jim in Anchorage
July 19, 2013, 07:12 PM
I guess Erik really does guide. Here's his website---http://www.bushwhackalaska.com/

gym
July 21, 2013, 10:15 AM
I have become a big fan of the show, although the life style is not for me. I still can enjoy the day to day struggle to stay on top of things. I don't understand the mindset of never being to relax for fear of something going wrong. But I guess that is part of the allure. You also have to be a loner, I am to a degree, but need the occasional contact weather female or just walking into a store and looking around. Also not a fan of cold weather, maybe if it was on a desert Island. Like Life over 90 degrees.
Like a Robinson Crusoe type.

bassdogs
July 22, 2013, 12:00 PM
Just got home from a 3000 mile round trip to the Colorado mtns and returned to the last 2 episodes on my DVR. Watched them both this am. Will hate to see this season end.

More ?? for Bou:

1] Why don't you use handheld personal radios to communicate when you are separated on a hunt?

2] Why don't you mark channels of deep areas of a lake with a GPS during the warm months so you have a better shot at finding where to drill your ice fishing hole?

3]Still interested on "Native" hunting vs non-native regulations.

Thanks

FrostyHL
August 3, 2013, 01:26 PM
Just watched the show for the first time and really enjoyed it. Thank you Caribou for letting us all in on your lives and for giving us some further insight in this thread. Looking forward to more episodes.

alias
August 3, 2013, 01:42 PM
Love the show, and I don't like much on TV. Caribou, if you don't mind my asking, my wife (who also loves the show, especially Agnes and your kids) would like to know if there's any significance to the skull and crossbones on your sign. Wish I was tough enough to do what you do, but my wife put her foot down when I was offered a job in Anchorage. She "wasn't going anyplace people have to plug in their cars".

HoosierQ
August 3, 2013, 06:08 PM
I gotta ask Caribou. Trivial question. What kind of gloves are you guys wearing? They look like the sort you buy at gas stations down here for $3.99. Leather palms and fingers with cloth backing. I ask because those have no insulation properties at all. Are these something different?

caribou
August 3, 2013, 11:59 PM
We carry several pairs of gloves, bloody or wet gloves will kill you if your lucky, get your hands cut off if you don't. I like leather gloves with a fuzzy lineing, and 3 pairs with me, inna pcket a couple on the ride and spare. I have a pair just for gassing up and another for setting traps.


The preference for a bolt action M-39 is, first and formost, Accuracy and dealing with the first shot the best you can. Only accurate rifles are interesting and with he ranges we have here, a large .30 caliber bullet can close those distances quite well. A bolt action that's difficult to work in the deep cold is 10X easier to deal with than a semi auto thats up to such at the same temps. It dosent help when 5 days of filming is canned into 'one' few minute segment.
Animals in leg hold traps are not bad Karma. They are still intact when you arrive to kill them for their skin. Connibear and other "killer traps" kill animals instantly are often raided by Ravens, who pluck the dead animal and eat them, as well as those who are attracted by the Ravens, and they ruin the skin and the trap set, so theres the crux of the trapper, and both have their use, but it depends on circumstance where you are and what you plan to catch.

We don't mark the channels as the lake is actually an "inlet" and brackish in water. We don't own a GPS anyway, a compass and experience are still just fine, with no batteries required. Also, Two things make it change every day and year; Tides and the thickness of the ice. The tides lift the ice twice a day, and this year the ice was 5 feet thick, last year it was 3. The Shee fish cruise the narrow gaps because thats where the small fish they seek are "Tarpon of the North" are a hunting in the 2 or so feet between the bottom of the 'lake' and the bottom of the ice. We are often 'feeling' with our jig just how deep it is. Once a series of holes are established in general, we move ever few hours and get ahead of the school o'fish, Nat Geo didn't have time to see such, but thats how it go's.

Hand held radios are illegal to use during a Hunt. They are what we use in an emergency to call for help or check in to a village with. Besides, the cold kills the batteries and you want them strong and fresh, to broadcast far to get you some help, so we carry them in our parkas and keep them warm, and use them as little as possible.

There are no "Native-non Native" State of Alaska fish and game laws, we are all citizens and equal. You are most likely referring to Federal managed hunting for international Migratory Marine Mammals ;
Native folks have a tradition of makeing a living from the sea and using its products, even 100 miles away, via trade and migration (we move to the coast most summers, or very close, like this summer, 7 bends up a river delta), by eating what they caught from the oceans, fish and Marine mammals, as well as a history of making a large part of their meals, clothes and foot wear from Marine Mammals, but when commercial whaling and Sealing was bringing the populations to the brink, something world wide had to be done, this was in the 60's. Since there was no other tradion among non Native Alaskans than Commercial Hunting out of Nantucket and San Francisco, ect, and with the KKK ,Aryen Brotherhood or the Republican party were what Caucasion folks had for representation, shuks.... nor did I hear of the NAACP or another organization speak up for their chunk of Blubber........, and there was no hunting alotted when Commercial hunting was banned. These Native folks spoke up, gave fine examples and when the act took effect, were protected to live, eat and hunt as they had the day before it was in effect. Also, Sea Mammal hunting is allowd to only the Natives who reside along the coast and the tributarys that lead to them (You cant be an anchorage whaling captain) were allowed to keep hunting for food. Feds said where Hunting could occur and where they cannot.
On the Federal way of doing things, like fishing , for example, if theres "Lots" then every one fishes, commercial, subsitence and all. When numbers fall, then commercial guys are cut off first and catching fish for personal food only contenues, but when the numbers really suck, then no one fishes..................... Same same for Marine Mammles in Federally controlled waters.

Soon, nobody will get to hunt Polar Bears, and theres a subsitence restriction of 58 Bears killed by all Human causes in both Russia and the US combined. The numbers are dropping off in the Bering, Chukchi and Beufort Seas.
I think the Salmon fishing south of me is an example as well.

The International Whaleing Commition controlls the nubers of Whales struck, according to poulations, and moniters the countrys that still hunt Whales and Seals.

Canada, Russia, Norway, the Fereo Island and Iceland still Whale and hunt Seals, and do so for eating skins and other tradional uses. Japan hunts 800+ whales a year for "Research" and sells the byproducts (100% of the Whale) commercially, in a huge Loophole in the Whaling commitiion.

I wish I could hunt Whales too, but its cool to see my family do such, and Seal hunting in Sept is commin'.

In this world of our there are only two kinds; Killers and Accomplices.

Even Farmers kill animals. wildlife for crop damage, their own raised animals, meats and products, and so does their fences, mono crops and loss of habitat and diversification, for wildlife, with now polutted water sheds being draind, as well as watershed filled with pesticides and fertilizers, and as we all know waters are redirected to grow those crops, making an unnatural change to the down stream.....fish runs and natural redistribution of waters to natural lands suffers.


People just have to realize the only way to live is to kill something, or pay someone to do it for you.

Buzznrose
August 4, 2013, 12:18 AM
Caribou, just wanted to add my thanks and congrats for making the show a hit, and really enjoy your family action. I spent 8 years in the Fairbanks area (left in 2001) and had a ball throughout the state.

Thanks for sharing your life with us "outsiders", and God Bless you and your village.

rcmodel
August 4, 2013, 12:24 AM
O.K.
Here's another question for you.

How did the Mosin become the mainstay up there in the first place??

I have always considered them really inferior in all respects, including sights, and difficulty of operating the action quickly, to a 1903 Springfield, 98 Mauser, or Lee-Enfield, when they were still cheap mil-sup rifles years ago.

All three work perfectly fine in sub-zero temps, as proven by WWII.

Then I remembered the Alaska National Guard native troops were still using M-14's long after the M-16 came along.

I wondered if some of those Russian Mosin rifles and ammo were stolen from the CCCP back during the cold war, and came across the ice from Russian outposts many years ago in trade for fish, fur, & anything else to eat & keep warmer with??

And the native population got used to them, and now prefer them, because Mosins were there to start with??

How far off base is that line of thinking??

rc

caribou
August 4, 2013, 01:23 AM
'Twas I and my friend Neal, , back in the late 80's and early 90's, back when I still had my Dead accurate Finn Mosin M28/30 and 6 cases of Chinese ammo, no kids and a GREAT paying job :D reading about Simo Hayha and skii'ng biathlon in highschool was my awakening to accurate large bore shooting.

We bought them from Centurey arms and took the worst ones (Cosmo in the chamber I Know, I know!!!! Iknow!!! ARRRRRRRRRRGHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!) that had shells stick in the chambers, we turned them into lamps and bought more with the proceeds 5 inna bundle, 100$ and the collection took hold. Neal sold them as soon as he got them, but I had first pick. Ammo in crates back them was 89$ -Landed in the Arctic- so ammo was plentyfull , accurate and the rifles spoke for themselves, hence they became pouplar, and not regarded as "Cheap" or such, but rather as a Hell of a bargin.

A GREAT cold weather Rifle, a Riflemans Rifle.

The stock is wood and wont stick to your face in the cold, its a bit heavy and that helps dampen felt recoil, as well, the wooden barrel guards keep the steel barrel from freezing to your hands, (you can start a fire in an emergence by shaveing tinder from the oil'd wood and hand guard) Parts are cheap and plentyfull, The stock can be easily modified, if necessary, has a cleaning rod that will easily clean the barrel of ice and snow, as well as corrosive salts, the "hold" is great for wide Eskimo cheeks, wrapped in a face mask and Fur cap tied down around those cheeks, as well as having a bolt that will lock shut when the safty is applied with no way inhell to take the safty off accidently. Well balanced and accurate, with a big trigger guard, and they are available with scopes that can take the brutality of Arctic weather and traveling, its a real no brainer....

Guys here are enamored with accuracy, and when I started showing them around, a few guys ended up getting their own and like Rem 700's and Winchesters, Mosin's came to be known as accurate and reliable. In the late 90's and early 2000, it was a no brainer for the guy who owned the Kotzebue Gun and Pawn to buy a bunch, as well, 800 rd cans of Czeck were 50$ and some shipping and M-39's were under 100$ landed.

Im enamored with antique Rifles, and the early Mosins appealed most to me, and the M-39 Sako I used for years had a reciver made in 1892.

A Stael of a deal with ammo , Rifle and plenty of practice, its a way different story today, the mosins and ammo are in plenty, as most guys bulk buy here in the Arctic, for food, fuel, ammo and such, as well, its 40$ for 20 30-06 shells in the store , so the Bargin still holds, till the ammo runs out........Privi Partizan will be popular then, Im thinking.....

The first Mosins were AK Territorial Guard issue,1920 or so, all Remington manufacture I understand, from the cancelled contracts when the Tzar was over thrown bythe Soviets, still haven't see one. There were a lot of White Russian Troops who escaped the reds by coming to Alaska, even up this way, digging water ditches at gold mines and such, working their way to southern AK and settling in.I imagine some brought their issue,and traded or used them when here. The wife collected up locally, a nice 95 Winchester from a Federal prison that was reissued to an ATG man in Selawik prior to WWII, who was reissued an M-1917 when the Japanese invaded Alaska. Every man, from 14 on upo went Militia and stood too, in every village, and kept an eye on the lands and seas, until the Army came through and organized them into the ATG, and issed them all M-1917, and cases of ammo. They kept the Hunters hunting by supplying ammo during scarcety and having hem keep an eye open while doing so. The wifes collected quite a few M-1917's and some are decent , while other carried on as Hunting rifles till recently.

Sheepdog1968
August 4, 2013, 11:29 AM
Caribou, what do you consider to be acceptable accuracy for a hunting rifle? How long are you typical and longer shots?

Down in CA I see a lot of folks enamored with accuracy as well. I understand that for a bench rest rifle match or 500-1000 yard shooting. Otherwise, I'm it sure there is much real world difference between a sub MOA and 2 MOA rifle.

caribou
August 6, 2013, 07:24 AM
The wife and I both have always appreciated accurate rifles. Her, growing up as a Hunter, I growing up hunting to a lesser degree, but mucho enjoyed target shooting as a teen. An M28/30 was my first Mosin, and it was VERY accurate, so accurate I sold it to the Biathalon coach and bought two more.

M39's were quite the bargin in early 2000's, as was quality ammo in quantity. I had a favorite, a '42 SAKO with an 1893 reciver, it shot 2 inch groups via open sights with quality ammo, and handloading. I never did get into scoped rifles, the scopes up this way have a bad rep, 'cept Leupold. Seems the Soviet PU is up to snuff, from what I've seen.

The wife has her 'favorite' M-39 she still uses and picked up herself a PU scope'd M91/30 awhile back and is looking forward to some more shooting with it some time.

Hunting ranges are usually 100 or less yards, unless were on some really open ground, then out to 400 isn't too hard. Practise and knowing your limits helps , as does a high power rifle to close the gap.


With 3-4 extra snowmachines and the same guys 'stalking' along with us, the "gap" has grown to 200 yards and sometimes its just not doable. gas consumption played a part in kinking our hunts too, as well as inexperienced riders, so we took it easy on them last winter, but not this winter. As well, the editors add a miss or two, I guess to show its not as easy as some would think.


The sign was made for my birthday, drawn by my second oldest daughter, who has a thing for skulls, and likely felt we need a Human one on the porch ~~LOL!!~~ I don't know, but she got an older student in the wood shop to make it for her and I put it up :evil:

ShootingTargets7.com
August 6, 2013, 08:21 PM
Cool, I think I found a new show to check out, sounds like a good one!

I enjoyed flying Alaska also could live there one day myself.

BBQLS1
August 6, 2013, 10:38 PM
In this world of our there are only two kinds; Killers and Accomplices.

Even Farmers kill animals. wildlife for crop damage, their own raised animals, meats and products, and so does their fences, mono crops and loss of habitat and diversification, for wildlife, with now polutted water sheds being draind, as well as watershed filled with pesticides and fertilizers, and as we all know waters are redirected to grow those crops, making an unnatural change to the down stream.....fish runs and natural redistribution of waters to natural lands suffers.


People just have to realize the only way to live is to kill something, or pay someone to do it for you.

Very good thoughts about it. The only thing I think I would add is that we should take care of what we have and not waste it. The old timers down here remember when you may go a season without seeing a single deer. Things are much better now.

Sheepdog1968
August 6, 2013, 10:44 PM
Didn't realize scopes have a tough time up there. Thanks for that insight. Given that ammo is more expensive up there is reloading common?

caribou
August 7, 2013, 09:49 AM
Scopes are just fogging devices in the cold.
The Soviets solved this by holding the head a bit further back and cocked, and you naturally breath away from the scopes, as well other Soviet scopes have eye cups that seal the rear lens to protect them from such.

Reloading is not common, but not uncommon. My wifes older brothers reload, and help her with such, when needed.

Open sight get snowed over at worst , usually. When shooting down hill, as we prefer, theres no hold over and shooting with the sight on 150 kinda takes care of a long range shots from above, that's why we have a favored place called "on High"

caribou
August 8, 2013, 10:49 PM
I was asked why I don't shoot on the show, and Ive explained before, and here, As to no firearms, Im suprized you don't already know, but the jist is that two years ago an Alaska State Trooper assaulted my oldest daughter, a child at the time. Well, the Trooper she was talking to stopped the assault and restrained the other trooper, then placed him a distance away from us and took the girl to a different place and finished the interview. He taunted us by takeing a draw stance and fondling his gun, it got very freeky, but others were there and more were arriveing so he quit that, but I was sure, as were others, that we were gonna get shot.
I was , at the time the vice Fire Chief here in Noorvik, and with Red Cross, The S&R and on a Disaster planning commition with our borough, and a trail assistance rider (-40 Towtruck/EMT kinda stuff)the law says I have to report any assault on any child, and I would have anyway.
Soooooooooooo , Anyway, it didn't get any better, as a couple days later I saw the Trooper who ,because he could arrive at any time and my daughter was going to be traveling (we often see troopers at the airport) and because it was obvious that nothing had been done for that, I got a restraining order for her safety, and the state went nuts on me.
Its all a matter of Public Record.

they tried to give me a 25,170$ bill for their flawed investigation, but the judge blocked that, then we went to court where I lost to an alterd tape, the ONLY evidence, besides trooper lies, to be used against me.
So I was found guilt of Felony purgery/False reporting and made a felon,last July............... so I had the tapes analized by two independent companys, Sandcastle recordings and Britesolutions audio forensics, and both show the AST tapes are a total farce.
I presented these at my sentanceing, where I recived 7 years and 3 month in total, 3 years X's 2 suspended, + 15 months to serve, last November.

http://www.thearcticsounder.com/arti...d_seeks_appeal

The article mentions one 11 second gap, but there were 14 separate gaps we know of. Gaps are impossible on digital recorders, the simply give an On Time and an Off time, and both officers had several on off times on their recorders that day, so They attempted to cover the assault and were successful so far. The assaulting officers tape was made from the rearranged tape of the officer who stopped the assault.

Try as they might, and they certainly gave it their best, but they didn't fool everyone.

Sooooooooooooooo after the sentancing I walked out of the court, went home , the judge allow'd me free until retrial, which isn't gonna happen , because the only evidence is fake, and proven so.
The Judge and most every Alaska State Trooper in Kotzebue Post, and the Special Prosacuter brought in by the state,The Alaska Beuro of Investigation Trooper also has complete knowlage of the felonius cuts, he heard them too, all who attended the sentencing all know about the evidence tampering. They say that Evil triumphs when good me do nothing, well I didn't see any good men, just a Judge who was mislead and a crew of Felons and those who aid/cover their crimes..........but I would not recant, I would not admit guilt where I had done no wrong.
I was never arrested, never read any rights, only summoned to Court, never spent a day in jail due to this, its simply "Life in Limbo" as to firearms, so I have been trapping, Fishing and using a bow and lance on Caribou, as you have all seen, and still do all but carry the rifle or shoot. Ive been driving the boat anyways, its teamwork, and driving on waterways or across frozen tundra requires someone, and its a joy having a front row seat with Agnes shooting, as it was when our boys were teens and doing such.

Archery and using a Lance with trapping has been the way I maintain. You might have noticed that my references to guns is in past tense....but I do look forward, as Time marches on.....


A couple things are looking quite positive;
So many people in Noorvik saw what happened that day, I get GREAT community support; Money, leagal help,and people offering other assistance has been wonderfull, and the community of Kotzebue has been terrific for the most part. I am councled on this event when Im out nuch more than I am about the show. I also have a Federal Criminal Defense Lawyer working on this now, as well, so as slowly as the grinder of Justice turns, soon to crush the lies and criminals who perpetuated them...... my redemption draws near.

jim in Anchorage
August 8, 2013, 11:43 PM
Well so much for the simple life. I never ever say this, because people throw it around so casually but I will this time. Prayers offered up to get you out of that mess,Chip old buddy.

scaatylobo
August 9, 2013, 07:47 AM
Sorry for all your hassles and this retired LEO says I am sad and sorry that there are those that wear a badge ---- that should not.

Hope you get this hot pile of poo resolved,would love to see you get your RIGHTS back !.

caribou
August 9, 2013, 09:07 AM
These guys are the bad apples in the barrel, nothing more or less.

Archery isn't as nearly as productive as Rifles, its better that my wife shoots, but lancing Caribou last Fall was VERY productive!!

Having no guns in the house the last months has been weird.

My neighbor, Jim, also offers prayers,thank you, its a a very positive thing to do, but sometimes wisdom meeting reality gives me a smile, especially when he said to me said 'Just ask your self,'what would Jesus do?" and I told him "he should have got a lawyer!!! I should have gotten a laywer!!! Never, ever, get a Public Defender." ~~LOL!!~~

Funny thing is, Nat Geo still belived in me, from the start and my employment has really helped in that aspect. Were gearing up for more, X yer fingers for a season 2.

lloveless
August 9, 2013, 10:30 AM
Chip, you come across as a stable believable individual. I am sorry for your trevails, and sincerely hope the perps are brought to justice sooner rather than later. Thank you so much for sharing your life with us. Perhaps a defense fund could be set up at Wells Fargo so those of us who can, and have a will could donate.
ll

BBQLS1
August 9, 2013, 12:39 PM
Wow Caribou. I certainly hope things get worked out properly. Very sad. It's good to hear your family and friends ralley around you in your time of need.

caribou
August 10, 2013, 12:17 AM
Well, many people are scared to death of the AST, for good reason. The community as a whole is a large 'family' mostly related by blood or marriage, and enough people saw the doings of the day, so the truth is firmly established here in Noorvik.
Im in no need for a defence fund, but the idea is nice. I was done broke after doing repairs and such to my house, always expensive when its all flown in, when this hit, it took some doing, but Im financally stable at the moment and can shift for myself better, now. Again, for the offers and prayers, Im mucho appreciative!!

I look at the good things to keep the anxiety away; although heavily restricted in my doings, Ive deveolped an appreciation for a few things; Archery/lance hunting is tough, akin to a .22lr. Trapping was OK, mostly Fox, as most all the larger predators were looking for Caribou or the Rabbits, and both were scarse here on the delta. Staying close to home with out the freedom to move at will seriously deminished my catch. Returning home everyday seriously reduced my time out, as well.....but I hung with my kids more and worked on the house, yard, equipment, traps and snares and all. Then I gave most of it away and Im starting out with new stuff. I had the time to make myelf a new outfit, all but short of a gun and ammo. Sleds too, and all kinds of boating/Ocean Hunting tools and implements, and gave them to my sons, so Im not sitting idle, just comming up with things too do and the materials to do it with......The camp even has a new outhouse location, fish drying racks, stacks of fire wood, and the inside has a counter with washbasins to do the dishes on, and soon beds and shelves....in the hunting life, you have to have good equipment, and hand made is the best, like an Italian suit.

200Apples
August 10, 2013, 01:50 AM
.
caribou, my hat is off to you!

I need to sort out what we're willing to pay for our television package with She Who Watches Most Of It... hee! I've been wanting NatGeoChannel for some time now, and now I want to see your show.


Thanks for sharing your story. :-)

DM~
August 10, 2013, 10:11 AM
Well, many people are scared to death of the AST, for good reason.


That sure wasn't the case where "I" lived in Alaska... Too bad it's that way where you live.

I've personally known a few Alaska State Troopers and their familys, and shot with and against several more, they all were great guys, on the job and off.

DM

Sheepdog1968
August 10, 2013, 01:07 PM
I'd imagine very little of what you hunt goes to waste. What are some of the things you do with the game besides the eat the meat?

lemaymiami
August 10, 2013, 03:51 PM
Caribou I greatly enjoy watching that show (my brother lives near Palmer but your world makes his look easy by comparison -and his idea of a rifle is 375 H&H.). Glad to hear the backstory on your situation and hope justice prevails.

I'm also a retired cop and I have to say that I did see justice once or twice in the 22 years I was a cop - but it was purely incidental to everything else going on in the court rooms I attended down here in Florida.... Your advice about getting a lawyer should be written in every one's book the day they become an adult, period (unfortunately...).

caribou
August 10, 2013, 09:30 PM
Well, at least let me set it straight as to my view on 'cops';

I have many friends that are police, even Police Cheifs, in Kotz and these small villages. No problem with their doings or departments, they run a great show and all with great respect and are outstanding in doing what they do, very professionally.
SnR's, deathes, suicides, crashes, fires, ect, I've worked with many a Trooper over many years, all, very professional.

I have no beef with 'law enforcment' at all,(some peole hate police, just because they are police) but the wall of Blue I hit makes me concerned, and I see that this kind of behavior is tollerated and they proctect the criminals, as well as further victemize those who were assaulted and then framed. THAT is discerning, to say the least. That is the AST here. A great many have first hand knowlage, and yet the perps still work like nothing happend...

This was the FIRST, and hopefully last incident Ive seen involving such behaviour. However, its needing to be adressed by their supiors, and I fear they allready know, and yet they do nothing. Fact is, after its all settled, Im hopeing for an improvement, and hopefully the folks in the villages will come to trust AST again, but Im not the only victem. Destroying the relationship that AST had with these villages in the 80's and 90's is whats happend. The AST has made law enfocement in the villages very diffacult. Far too many folks here saw/were victems that day. What has transpired has only gone to show to this region is that when people are victemized bythe AST, that they can only expect things to get worse. This is not Right at all, and not how lawenforcement shoould act or be viewd. It has become a very polarizing ordeal and most folks ,now, will not cooperate with or call the AST because they outcome is uncertain and noone can tust that the right things be done anymore by the AST. This needs to be adressed. When you publicly victemize people in an isolated village of 685, with many witness's, this is what happens. More for than myself, this needs to be corrected.

Someday, soon, this will all turn around and we will see an improvement, just give it time, the wheels are in motion.


I went through this last Nov, and Ive had a difficult liveing because of it, but I try my best to look forward, and knowing it will end is comforting. I try my best to not let it interfear with my life, posting here, working on the show, ect....... :D High Road and you guys have kept me SANE!!

Thank You one and all!!! Really.

Ill tell ya too, the wheels are in motion for season 2, andin Sept, the next/last six episodes of Season 1 will be on, I hope you like them two.

We do as much as we can with our Catch; even a dog has to eat :D Skins and such become museum displays and arts/crafts to make the $$ to make the world go by fast, powerd by gasoline :D

http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/Maniilaqdisplay8.jpg (http://s53.photobucket.com/user/edwardhailstone/media/Maniilaqdisplay8.jpg.html)

jim in Anchorage
August 11, 2013, 07:32 AM
So when is your retrial? And if theres a retrial, does that mean the first was thrown out as a mistrial?

caribou
August 11, 2013, 07:54 AM
Since the only evidence they have is totally tamperd with, and the review for retrial is in March, but the lawyer is sure that it will be much sooner. This is now Federal, and I believe they fix departments that are corrupted in such ways.


There will be no re-trial. If the AST dosent kill me first, the evidence will be seen quite well that theres nothing to base a trial on, and then the case will be dropped/dismissed, Im sure, but I wont drop anything until its expunged and the felonies committed against me and others are addressed and the public safe again. We cannot have criminals with badges, this must be corrected. The Federal Investigator that came here and I discussed the evidence with said that the tampering was denying me my Right to a fair trial and was important to them because it involves Police. I played the most obvious cuts for them to easily recognize, and they took a copy to deal with when they left town. So Im not sure when anythings going to happen, it took a loooooong time to get this far.

I will not stop because I told the truth, and although its been buryied pretty deep, the truth cannot be changed, and the judicial system hasn't completely failed, its only been fooled for awhile. The other victims have ben talking with a lawyer now, too, that I think is going to do a class action suit, so Im not the only one.

I will not stop because I will have to do paperwork for the rest of my life.

scaatylobo
August 11, 2013, 09:52 AM
This retired LEO knows full well there is a country mile between the 'law' and JUSTICE.

I hope you win on both counts !.

You strike me as a honest and VERY hard working man that just wants the best for himself & his family.

Keep to the high road, and the win will taste all that much better :cool:.

stressed
August 11, 2013, 10:32 AM
Caribou,

I'm sorry to hear about the nonsense you are having to deal with.

It looks like a lot of open tundra you are crossing. Could you use a lifted 4x4 with large tires and lockers or mattracks to cross the terrain, or is the high price of fuel counter-productive? I think it would be cheaper then a Sno-Cat.

Is it open season to hunt whatever you need to eat all year, all animals? I notice your location is NW Alaska. I remember reading something about professional poachers up there armed with automatic military weapons to include belt-fed machineguns, helicopters, thermal sights, night vision and other high tech equipment. Walrus, seals, bear were their targets mostly. You hear anything about that near you? I understood they operated in completely uninhabited areas.

krupparms
August 11, 2013, 12:05 PM
Caribou, Sorry to here of your problems with L.E.! This has become to common for justice to take a vacation! I had my civil rights violated by local P.D. for open carry in my home! After making complaints I have been harrassed even more. No agency would do anything! Now in federal court. I was told that if I drop the charges, I can be charged! I live on SSI & don't have alot of money & may have to drop the case because of that! ( Never new you had to pay to take the bad guy to jail!). Injustice of this kind is intolerable! I hope you get this taken care of soon! I think your show is great! I would love the solitude but not the cold! I think your show also gives us a view that most will never get to see or understand! Thank you &your family for that. Also I like the others &think they show us all that survival is different for us all! Good luck &I hope & pray you get some justice &it doesn't put you to far into debt!

caribou
September 1, 2013, 07:55 AM
Thanks for the heads up, guys. Haveing Lawenforcement go nuts isnt new, but it must be delt with for the common good. I wish you good luck Krupparms, you, my friend, will need it.

I am sooooooooo dissapointed with the AST's doings.

I see , too , that the adress i referred to above has been "changed' so here it is again;

http://www.thearcticsounder.com/article/1249noorviks_hailstone_sentenced_seeks_appeal

Alaso, to answer the question about hunting seasons and such, we ALL inthe State of AK have to folow the allowed seasons and bag limits. Caribou in my game Unit are huntable every day, "But" in Summer they are 500 miles North , on the Norh slope, and in winter 200 or so miles South, so they pass by twice a year, and we get what we can, when we can, especcially with gas at 8$ a gallon.

The high tec shootings your referring to were the Russian Military and ChukChi natives of that region were just trying to eat, when the Gov there didnt send resupply or pay their troops for months on end, so they 'used what they had" and fed themselfs, and quite a few "off base" folks to boot......no big deal when you know what it is to be hungry.
Now with a Stable Russia, such happenings are seldom, if nonexistant. The Alaska Whaling Commission also alloted a percentage of its 'strikes" on Whales to Russian Natives of the Far East, so they can better fend for themselfs, as the "gov" over there used to controll such and now, basicly dosent exist, so folks are free to fend for themselfs again.

Well, I should say that Season #2 is gonna start getting filmed soon, and the final 6 episodes of the first season will arrive to your TV soon :D

still, if you have questions, I have answers....when Im home :D ~~LOL!!~~

leprechaun50
September 1, 2013, 01:59 PM
Good luck with your show, andI hope you get your other problems settled as well.

John3921
September 1, 2013, 10:56 PM
Best of luck to you Chip! I hope this all works itself out.

hang fire
September 2, 2013, 01:54 AM
Thanks for the heads up, guys. Haveing Lawenforcement go nuts isnt new, but it must be delt with for the common good. I wish you good luck Krupparms, you, my friend, will need it.

I am sooooooooo dissapointed with the AST's doings.

I see , too , that the adress i referred to above has been "changed' so here it is again;

http://www.thearcticsounder.com/article/1249noorviks_hailstone_sentenced_seeks_appeal

Alaso, to answer the question about hunting seasons and such, we ALL inthe State of AK have to folow the allowed seasons and bag limits. Caribou in my game Unit are huntable every day, "But" in Summer they are 500 miles North , on the Norh slope, and in winter 200 or so miles South, so they pass by twice a year, and we get what we can, when we can, especcially with gas at 8$ a gallon.

The high tec shootings your referring to were the Russian Military and ChukChi natives of that region were just trying to eat, when the Gov there didnt send resupply or pay their troops for months on end, so they 'used what they had" and fed themselfs, and quite a few "off base" folks to boot......no big deal when you know what it is to be hungry.
Now with a Stable Russia, such happenings are seldom, if nonexistant. The Alaska Whaling Commission also alloted a percentage of its 'strikes" on Whales to Russian Natives of the Far East, so they can better fend for themselfs, as the "gov" over there used to controll such and now, basicly dosent exist, so folks are free to fend for themselfs again.

Well, I should say that Season #2 is gonna start getting filmed soon, and the final 6 episodes of the first season will arrive to your TV soon :D

still, if you have questions, I have answers....when Im home :D ~~LOL!!~~
Speaking of being self reliant, I found this documentary about Russian trappers on the Taiga in Siberia to be fascinating. Truly self reliant peoples have skills most of us cannot even begin to comprehend.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xw06wh_happy-people-a-year-in-the-taiga-2011-russia-siberia_shortfilms

caribou
September 2, 2013, 03:45 AM
Ive seen that, 'Happy People', its excellent!!

The snowmachines, heating with wood, trapping and hunting, as well as useing local materials to make arts and crafts to sell to buy mor gas and bullets...That I can relate to... :D

They havent been long in being 'self reliant' by law, as under Communisim, key parts of their lives and organization of their doings were controlled by the gov........but they never forgot what Hard work was, and that will get anyone outta a hole, anywhere on earth.

Not haveing the helocopter of goods or going home arrive musta been maddening...... that was an eye opener.

Back in the days of "brigades" (Ive met alot of ChukChi) Reindeer Herders, Trappers, and Ice Pack Hunters were 'issued ' rifle, certain ammounts of ammo and the snowmachines were of 1970's designs. They had to turn over the major proportions of their catch and livestock products, when the hearded Reindeer. A ship came up and hunted Whales for them, the locals were not allowed to whale, now they have gotten adjusted, do most all for themselfs as well as develope outlets for sales of their products,as well as tourisim............ and figured out how best to do so well that modern equipment is sustainable in their Subsistence economy. Until the advancements of the 2000's, they had 50's era tools and machines, as well as a terrible transportation system, as all things Soviet rotted and fell apart.

I bet gas is EXPENSIVE, and the rides are used to haul loads, and most else done on foot, no playing around. They had a hard time across the straights in the later 90's, north of the Bering Sea, and many almost starved. Now, its good to see the Russians and Siberians have an easy enough time to do for themselfs and even drag a camera man along :D

goon
September 2, 2013, 03:58 AM
Caribou - you ain't around Kotz, are you? We might have crossed paths without my even knowing it.

goon
September 2, 2013, 04:15 AM
I would really love to spend about a month up there and see how tough I really am [ at my age,not more than that amount of time,I aint that stupid/stubborn ].

There was guy from Wisconsin who also thought that was a good idea. Lots of people up there spent last summer/fall looking for his remains until weather shut the search down. His family tried again in the summer, but let's face it - the arctic is a pretty harsh place. The guy just isn't going to be seen again, period. One bad decision really can get you killed there, sometimes within sight of civilization. It is an eerie feeling to be out on a snow machine and feel the cold chipping away at you and to know that you really are mortal. If that doesn't humble you, then maybe you deserve to freeze...
And if witnessing break-up doesn't humble you, you definitely deserve to freeze!

The guy from WI is gone now and I doubt anyone will ever know what happened to him.
This prompted my boss up there to advise me to wear bright clothing when I went out and always carry a gun.
Personally, I'm pretty sure that right now, I'm not quite up to the test either.

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