Animal Planets "Invasion of the mutant hogs"


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TexasPatriot.308
May 26, 2013, 01:22 PM
some of this was filmed near some of my pastures....what a sensationalized piece of bull hocky. any animal will defend its young uns. a wounded boar may come after you but you need to know what you are doing. we have learned here about driving at night, most of the pigs are black and hard to see, just slow down and watch out. these pigs aint monsters, I kill them with a .17hmr almost daily....you would think these feral pigs are bullet proof and stalking humans....like I said bunch of sensationalism....these experts also labeled a pack of javelinas as wild hogs (some experts). Javelinas aint even hogs they are in a different class, rodent I think.

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Sol
May 26, 2013, 01:35 PM
Feral pigs do not bring in viewers and ratings. MUTANT MONSTER HOGS bring in the viewers.

Texan Scott
May 26, 2013, 02:03 PM
Once again, standing in my kitchen singing "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes"...

armoredman
May 26, 2013, 02:41 PM
Thanks, Scott, now I'll be humming that tune all day...
Javalina are rodents - good tasting rodents if cooked right.
As for the title, remember the newspaperman's mantra - "if it bleeds, it leads!"



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wfm3_BMinhg

Patocazador
May 26, 2013, 02:51 PM
Javelinas are one step away from hogs according to taxonomists and zoologists. They are in 'Suinae' along with hogs but in Genus pecari rather than sus. They are not rodents.

Texan Scott
May 26, 2013, 02:55 PM
BAAHAHAHAHAHAAA, Hahahahaaaa, wheeeeee....

And yeah, they're only very remotely related to actual pigs. Proper English name for them is "collared peccary", also known to some as "skunk pigs", for reasons immediately obvious ... they actually have musk glands.

Double Naught Spy
May 26, 2013, 07:30 PM
Right, not rodents but not one step away either. They are in a completely different Family.

MCgunner
May 26, 2013, 09:29 PM
Wife and I thought it was a comedy. It was hilarious! :D Teenaged mutant ninja pigs. Next, I guess, is a video game if it ain't already out.

Yeah, we were making jokes like "I'll go close the chicken pin, you cover me with the shotgun just in case a mutant ninja hog comes after me." I've killed several pigs with a .357 magnum, too, does an amiable job. But, on that show, it bounced off. Well, first, ya gotta HIT the pig. Even a .460 S&W won't kill a pig if you don't HIT it. :rolleyes:

I'm thinkin', though, if that show scares even ONE tree hugger from moving to Austin, hey, it was a good show. :D

As I understand it, Javelina are same order as pigs, just different family. They're not even close to rodents, though. They do taste like pork, very, very lean pork, but pork. Make good tamales and mixed with lots of pork fat, ain't bad sausage. Got to soak the stink out of 'em, though. That big zit on their back must come off ASAP, too.

Art Eatman
May 26, 2013, 10:27 PM
Gotta watch them there javelulus. Mean, vicious beasts!

My friends, Dale & Donna, have a dozen or more of these hanging around their home. They're a hoot to watch.

MCgunner
May 26, 2013, 10:43 PM
I remember watching an episode of "Survivorman", Les Stroud, a Canadian (what would HE know about Javelinas, anyway?) in Aridzona. He sees these stink pigs come along a dry wash and he's going on about how dangerous they are and he doesn't wanna disturb 'em or they could attack. :rolleyes: Well, I guess they COULD, but they don't exactly eat humans for meals. I do know from experience, however, that they do NOT like being shot.

Texan Scott
May 26, 2013, 10:56 PM
Well, Art... I can see WHY they have a dozen skunk pigs... she's FEEDING them. My wife is our local "crazy cat lady".... but feeding javelinas?

Art Eatman
May 26, 2013, 11:53 PM
Hey, they like milo, okay?

Birds are messy feeders, scattering seeds from the feeder hanging from the eave of my front porch. So, every now and then, javalinas on the porch, attracted by the smell of the seeds. And the water pan at the end of the porch eases their thirst.

Like deer, they tend to feed downwind. So, if you stay cross wind, you can wander along with them, maybe ten yards away. They're very nearsighted.

At least they don't do like foxes: Eat the cracked corn from hen scratch that I throw out for the quail, and then come up on my porch and leave evidence that foxes don't digest corn.

I dunno. I just get a kick out of messing with critters.

22-rimfire
May 27, 2013, 01:16 AM
I watched the show. They are a problem to be sure. I wish ranchers would allow people onto their property just to hunt hawgs (for free), instead they want to charge for the most part.

Double Naught Spy
May 27, 2013, 05:59 AM
I wish ranchers would allow people onto their property just to hunt hawgs (for free), instead they want to charge for the most part.

Yeah, we all want a free ride, but such free rides certainly can encumber the land owner with a significant amount of risk.

MCgunner
May 27, 2013, 11:47 AM
<...pollyticks...>

Yeah, damned shame the guy that owns the land and pays the exorbitant property taxes in this state should have the right to charge for access to his land. Go figure......

I just got off to the "killer mutant" aspect of this tall tale in this TV show. The idea of pigs running out of the woods to attack a jogger, wow, I'll never go outside again. roflmao!

303tom
May 27, 2013, 01:16 PM
Javelina are pigs, ie Peccary, they are not Rodents.................

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peccary

Double Naught Spy
May 27, 2013, 04:46 PM
I just got off to the "killer mutant" aspect of this tall tale in this TV show. The idea of pigs running out of the woods to attack a jogger, wow, I'll never go outside again. roflmao!

Right, the number of "attacks" outside of hunting, trapping, pursuit (usually hog dogging), or wrangling incidents of feral hogs is extremely small and most are nothing but bluff charges and the like. Even more rarely, a hog does make contact with a person not involved in those endeavors, but I would be willing to bet that folks can't put together a documented list of more than 20 incidents in the last 30 years where this has happened and somebody got injured as a result.

Most of the sensationalized attacks are like this one. This guy is trying to trap hogs in a pen, got too close to the confined animals and one got defensive with him. Go figure. http://www.khou.com/news/Texas-man-attacked-by-feral-pig-125490018.html

If you Google news of feral hogs attacks, you come up with pretty much nothing that is of actual attacks. If you just do a Google general search, you find lots about attacks, several videos, etc., but most or all involve hunting, trapping, pursuing, or otherwise wrangling of feral hogs.

Feral hogs are definitely a problem, but sensationalizing the issue with misrepresentation doesn't benefit resolution of the problem...which is what the Mutant show is doing.

Patocazador
May 27, 2013, 06:33 PM
I have had two hogs come at me. One chased my dog back to me through thick palmettos and I killed it with buckshot the instant I laid eyes on it. That was 5 feet away!
The other time I stepped between a sow and her pigs while turkey hunting. She caught me and I had to get over 20 stitches.

I don't believe either hog planned to get me in advance ... just a victim of circumstances.

pps
May 28, 2013, 12:50 AM
Dammit! I went hog hunting this weekend here in cali...NOTHING! I could have used a little hogzilla action. lol :banghead:

MCgunner
May 31, 2013, 11:35 AM
Dammit! I went hog hunting this weekend here in cali...NOTHING! I could have used a little hogzilla action. lol

Prolly, you weren't dressed right. You should try wearing jogging shorts and running shoes. I hear they'll come out of the brush to attack you. :D

alsaqr
May 31, 2013, 05:23 PM
Missed that one.

TexasPatriot.308
May 31, 2013, 11:45 PM
I been nailin my usual one or 2 this week....catch em out in the open with ar Ar10.....the rain has brought them out last few nights. wait till they group up and open up....the .308 is a helluva hog round, then got to drag them stinking vermin off.

xxjumbojimboxx
June 1, 2013, 08:19 PM
Once again, standing in my kitchen singing "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes"...
hahahha!

xxjumbojimboxx
June 1, 2013, 08:26 PM
At the hunters cert course i took here in texas not long ago a dude said a hog took his old man's leg off at the knee... Is that possible?.. no one laughed when he said it...

Double Naught Spy
June 1, 2013, 09:04 PM
While it might be possible, it isn't remotely likely. There are some boars with long tusks that can certainly cut you significantly, but "nearly took his leg off at the knee" would be quite a stretch. That would assume the tusk missed the bone and cut through most of the joint and that isn't likely to happen.

I don't doubt the guy got a good cutting, but "nearly took his leg off at the knee" is about like a fighting threatening to knock off your head with his punch. The leg didn't almost get cut off and the fighter can't knock off your head with a punch.

No one laughed because they didn't want to call the guy a liar or because they knew that he was stretching the truth to make a point and arguing or laughing wasn't appropriate at the time. The old coot, Campbell, of American Hoggers claims to know of people killed and eaten by hogs as well, but strangely there doesn't seem to be any record of such events.

If you didn't see pictures, then I would discount the claim. A gash in the leg isn't anything like almost taking off the leg.

Art Eatman
June 1, 2013, 09:07 PM
Don't go into a hog pen to feed the hogs and fall over from a heart attack. That happened to a farmer near Ocala, Florida, around 1960.

What remains remained were messy.

They will kill and eat baby sheep and goats. So...

MCgunner
June 3, 2013, 12:31 AM
I knew a little guy worked at the feed store in Port Lavaca, had a scar from his naval to his left nipple from a hog. BUT, he was stickin' 'em with a knife and it got loose of the dogs. That sort of thing happens too often to dog hunters, usually to the dogs, but occasionally to the hunters.

alsaqr
June 4, 2013, 10:19 PM
Unprovoked attacks by wild hogs are very rare: But they do happen. A hog hunting friend was knocked down by a big unseen sow while hunting. He killed that sow with the M1911 pistol worn on his leg. The sow did not have pigs.

This British lady was riding a horse when a huge hog spooked the animal. The horse threw her off and the hog attacked her.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-410319/Nurse-savaged-enraged-giant-pig.html

Three unprovoked attacks by wild boars in Turkey:

phossil.com/thom/4th%20July%20Hog/Wild%20Boar%20Attacks/...

Found numerous attacks by wild hogs in India. But all kinds of crazy stuff happens in India.

This from Pakistan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCs2Z_a2q8M

Double Naught Spy
June 4, 2013, 11:57 PM
LOL, it is hard to call an attack unprovoked when the hog hunter gets attacked by a hog. Most folks would call that self defense!

The British lady's attack might have been by a pig, but there is no indication that it was by a wild hog. It is only identified as a giant pig. Given the low population of wild hogs in England, there is a far greater chance it was by a domestic hog than a wild one.

The Turkish link is incomplete and does not work.

As for the Pakistani video, I don't see anywhere that it was claimed that the attack was unprovoked. For all we know, the lumberjack went after the pig first.

alsaqr
June 5, 2013, 09:47 AM
LOL, it is hard to call an attack unprovoked when the hog hunter gets attacked by a hog.

My friend was simply still hunting in the woods when he was hit by a sow he never saw.

Yep, DNS, all kind of stuff "could have happened". The fact is that the temperament of Eurasian and African boars sometimes differ from your average Montague county farm hogs gone wild.

i have spent thousands of hours hunting, trapping and observing wild hogs in OK and TX. Many of the wild hogs in this area are Eurasian boars and the hybrid descendents of Eurasian boars. Never heard of one of these doing a "bluff charge" either. They either charge or they do not charge.

i'm very leery of the claims put out by hog "experts" and fish and game biologists, in particular. Some of the latter are still claiming that hogs in the wild often have two or three litters of pigs per year.

jmorris
June 5, 2013, 10:01 AM
...like I said bunch of sensationalism....

Sounds like its not any different than any of the "reality" shows.

I am happy to see that there are "gun" shows on TV but I just can't stand to watch them. Think I did make it through 2 episodes of Topshots though.

Double Naught Spy
June 5, 2013, 11:48 AM
Yep, DNS, all kind of stuff "could have happened". The fact is that the temperament of Eurasian and African boars sometimes differ from your average Montague county farm hogs gone wild.

i have spent thousands of hours hunting, trapping and observing wild hogs in OK and TX. Many of the wild hogs in this area are Eurasian boars and the hybrid descendents of Eurasian boars. Never heard of one of these doing a "bluff charge" either. They either charge or they do not charge.

Oh, so you have the dreaded Eurasian wild boars in your area too??? In Montague County that borders south central Oklahoma, so do we!! As with the stories hunters tell everywhere about how their boars are bigger, badder, meaner, more aggressive because of the imported wild boars (usually called "Russians") have been imported into the area and released or escaped, we have the same ones. In fact, it was apparently a large game ranch NW of the county seat that was responsible, not that other Russians haven't come in from nearby counties or from your side of the border where they have been reportedly turned out as well.

Everybody seems to have the dreaded Russian boars, but virtually none of them have ever actually had any of the local Russian/Eurasian wild boar or hybrid stock actually genetically tested or confirmed through cranial biometrics. They usually base such field IDs on nondiagnostic claims such as split guard hairs, tail curl, leg length, musculature, disposition, coloration, etc.

alsaqr
June 5, 2013, 01:18 PM
Everybody seems to have the dreaded Russian boars, but virtually none of them have ever actually had any of the local Russian/Eurasian wild boar or hybrid stock actually genetically tested or confirmed through cranial biometrics. They usually base such field IDs on nondiagnostic claims such as split guard hairs, tail curl, leg length, musculature, disposition, coloration, etc.

This hog was killed by me on Ft. Sill in 2007. He had a small tag in his ear from a game farm in Bavaria, Germany. That hog was one of 100 pairs imported from Germany and released in SW OK.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll268/alsaqr/CopyofBoar25Sep07001.jpg (http://s290.photobucket.com/user/alsaqr/media/CopyofBoar25Sep07001.jpg.html)

MCgunner
June 6, 2013, 10:46 AM
Yep, DNS, all kind of stuff "could have happened". The fact is that the temperament of Eurasian and African boars sometimes differ from your average Montague county farm hogs gone wild.

i have spent thousands of hours hunting, trapping and observing wild hogs in OK and TX. Many of the wild hogs in this area are Eurasian boars and the hybrid descendents of Eurasian boars. Never heard of one of these doing a "bluff charge" either. They either charge or they do not charge.

The pigs I trap in Calhoun County Texas were escaped from the Powderhorn Ranch, originally bought in the 1930s from the San Antonio zoo and stocked there. There was no feral hog population and they've spread to surrounding ranches including mine. Their phenotype is almost 100 percent European wild hog to this day. Yet, I can walk through my place, sit on the ground dove hunting, work on my stand, whatever, and not fear attack. There's so many hogs out there now, you hear 'em back in the oak motts fighting if you sit there long enough. They don't come out of those motts in daylight. They seem to know who's boss predator out there. :D

I won't let a grown one out of the trap alive. Nope, I won't do that, but I don't live in paranoia of a hog attack just walking around or working down there. I'm usually armed because I'm usually hunting. My biggest fear there this time of year is stepping on a rattler. Probably more rattlers than hogs down there and the grass is tall, not grazed or shredded. I do wear my snake boots, best defense against rattlers and I've already had 'em tested. But, I don't worry at all about the hogs there. Indeed, I've never heard of ANYone being attacked unprovoked in Calhoun County. It just doesn't happen. If it did to me, I'd run straight to the emergency room at Memorial Hospital in Port Lavaca and get rabies vaccinations.

Doesn't seem to be as many hogs up here and they're all feral, no wild phenotype up this way.

I've posted this paper's link before....

http://books.google.com/books?id=rh0LmDWdEI4C&pg=PA64&lpg=PA64&dq=powderhorn+ranch+wild+hogs&source=bl&ots=VZEWWsiSpM&sig=C4DQicn2jsjHWb5Z7GQlhunDzqA&hl=en&ei=SuzaToiIBYTM2AWU84DbDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=powderhorn%20ranch%20wild%20hogs&f=false

alsaqr
June 6, 2013, 11:10 AM
I won't let a grown one out of the trap alive.

Neither will i. Sometimes we keep the little ones: A friend raises them in a big boll wagon that has hay bales, water and food. When those pigs reach 50-60 pounds they become barbecue.

Patocazador
June 6, 2013, 05:31 PM
I went to Tennessee years ago to "hunt" "Russian Boars" on a pay-for-play fenced area. 3 years later I was filling up my truck's tank on I-75 and a cow trailer full of feral hogs pulled in. The driver was taking 100 trapped hogs from east-central Florida to the famed "Russian Boar" place to be turned loose for gullible guys like me to kill. They were trapped about 40 miles from my house. :D

Double Naught Spy
June 6, 2013, 06:01 PM
And know you know...the rest of the story, LOL.

MCgunner
June 8, 2013, 11:25 AM
I went to Tennessee years ago to "hunt" "Russian Boars" on a pay-for-play fenced area. 3 years later I was filling up my truck's tank on I-75 and a cow trailer full of feral hogs pulled in. The driver was taking 100 trapped hogs from east-central Florida to the famed "Russian Boar" place to be turned loose for gullible guys like me to kill. They were trapped about 40 miles from my house.

Texas passed laws regulating the transport of wild pigs a few years back. You can transport directly to a licensed game farm/ranch/preserve or a buyer, though, but you cannot make stops in between and if you don't deliver them, you must kill them.....or something like that. I read the code a while back when I was contemplating selling hogs. Turns out, though, that you don't get enough for pigs to pay for the gas. :rolleyes; Maybe if I had 50 of 'em in a stock trailer, but not 2 or 3 at a time.

alsaqr
June 8, 2013, 12:16 PM
Turns out, though, that you don't get enough for pigs to pay for the gas. :rolleyes; Maybe if I had 50 of 'em in a stock trailer, but not 2 or 3 at a time.

The hog hunting ranches in OK pay $200 or more for a big boar with nice cutters. i know a couple hog trappers who sell all their hogs to those guys.

Double Naught Spy
August 19, 2013, 08:35 AM
Okay Tivo finally caught an episode for me. What a huge disappointment. The hype is so overblown to include outright blatant lies. I do like how they included a "team" to come to Texas to come help with the problem, as if the 3 folks of the "team" were going to stay any appreciable time to help. Then afterwards, all the "team" did was watch other people take a few hogs.

They keep referring to the feral hogs as "mutants" having "razor sharp teeth" and that anybody and everybody is in danger by pigs at any time. They are all potential killers, apparently.

"Males have also developed a shield of bone up to 2" thick around their shoulders which offers some protection from a bullet."

Um, no, not even close. The shield is NOT bone.

I have to admit that they did a cool experiment. They put a hog into a small penned area to look at the amount of damage it would do in one night. Neat. Not only did the hog root up part of the area, but apparently had the ability to generate water where there was none before, creating a pool of water in the enclosure. In other words, off camera they ran a lot of water to encourage the hog to dig and wallow.

Of course they hyped pigs spreading disease. All of the diseases carried by pigs are carried by normal livestock and indigenous species already.

At one point, they showed a great sunset behind a cactus noting that "tonight is the culmination of a mission." Interesting. The cactus was a saguaro cactus. These don't occur in Texas. The occur in Arizona.

So much more was wrong with the show, but I will stop. No doubt, hogs are bad, but I don't see where lies need to be created to portray them that way. They aren't mutants. They don't have razor sharp teeth. They don't attack people with any regularity without people first attacking them. Holy moly great googledy moogledy.

Carl N. Brown
August 19, 2013, 10:16 AM
Yes, the shield is gristle, not bone, and I have heard handloaders test "pig rounds" using a few layers of housing shingle to simulate the gristle.

Javelina (peccary, skunk pig, sajino) are "New World pigs" native to America distantly related to common domestic pigs brought over from the Old World by settlers. They are more related to hippos than to rodents.

Capybara are a South American rodent bigger (75 to 150 pounds)than javelina (45 to 90 pounds). Both are treated as pests in the near wild. Watching video of both, they can be confused from a distance.

Wild pigs can be dangerous, wild boar has the reputation of stalking hunters, and if they in group get you on the ground they will eat your face off. Actually domestic pigs will do that too. The many of the mutilated bodies photographed by Mathew Brady after the battle of Gettysburg had been savaged by domestic pigs after the battle was over.

But exaggerating the danger of wild pigs in "Invasion of Mutant Hogs" reminds me of a film I saw in the late 1950s: ""The wildest and most vicious of animals is the tiny shrew. The shrew feeds only by the dark of the moon. He must eat his own body weight every few hours, or starve; and the shrew devours everything - bones, flesh, marrow, everything. In March, first in Alaska, and then invading steadily southward, there were reports of a new species: the giant, killer shrew!" --"The Killer Shrews" starring James Best (later in "Dukes of Hazard") and Ingrid Goude (1956 Miss Sweden).

I do wish Animal Planet, NatGeo, etc. would back off the sensationalism, otherwise their DVDs could end up in the bargain bin shrinkwrapped with "Killer Shrews" and "Giant Gila Monster".

MCgunner
August 19, 2013, 02:30 PM
At one point, they showed a great sunset behind a cactus noting that "tonight is the culmination of a mission." Interesting. The cactus was a saguaro cactus. These don't occur in Texas. The occur in Arizona.

I completely missed that! I was probably too busy ROFL at the killer pig qualities they were raving about to pay that close attention. :D

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