Proficiency or Inherent Ease?


PDA






Life During Wartime
June 4, 2013, 06:03 PM
So, I asked a zombie question earlier and it was closed because as the mods informed me that is not a THR thing (sorry about that, really I didnt know). Because of that I decided to re-prhase one of the tenets of the question in a more acceptable non-zombies format. I hope this qualifies as a thread this time but if it does not, I apologize to the mods in advance.

Assuming that a person was amazing with a low-recoiling long barreled revolver and not that great with a high-recoiling 9mm auto (not that 9mm recoils much but does in the particular pistol I am thinking of)
and assuming that for some reason, such as a burglar in the house, a family member with very limited firearms skills needed to have one of the two pistols, which would be better.

Sacrifice the proficiency that one of the individuals has in the hope that the "easier" gun could be inherently easy for the other individual to use
or
keep the skill where the skill is to better the odds of efficiency?

If you enjoyed reading about "Proficiency or Inherent Ease?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Life During Wartime
June 4, 2013, 06:05 PM
I realize now, I should have put this in handguns, but I can't delete it now, so unless one of the mods would like to move it (please feel free), the same basic principle of the question can also be put to rifles I suppose.

9mmepiphany
June 4, 2013, 09:29 PM
The question isn't very clear, but what I'm getting is:
1. person #1 is proficient with a revolver and not as good with a semi-auto pistol
2. person #2 has limited skills with either

...and you're asking if the inherent ease person #2 using a semi-auto, with limited skills, outweighs the skills of person #1 with a revolver.

If that is your question and you are limiting it between two handguns (you'll noticed that I moved it); my answer would be No.

You should cater the choice of weapon to the person with the more limited skills.

This should not be taken as agreeing with your assumption that one is easier to handle than the other and is an opinion based on incomplete facts:
1. level of respective skills with different platforms
2. desire to improve skills

Jsg81
June 5, 2013, 12:22 AM
Perhaps I am reading more into the issue of recoil than intended but that is what sticks out to me in the question above.

That being said I would trust a .22 that I could make hits with over a 9mm that I was not sure I could make good hits with. As an example, my wife doesn't really like guns and has no desire to shoot much. That being said she can quickly put shots on a person sized target with my small .22. The came cannot be said of larger guns so she has the .22 beside her as we sleep every night. I wish she like to shoot more with larger guns and would get better with them but I have to play by the set of rules as I understand them today.

I hope I understood your question correctly.

mgmorden
June 5, 2013, 02:20 PM
If you're better with the wheel gun carry that. Person "B", if they're unfamiliar with firearms, should be familiarized. You don't want a gun in the hands of someone who doesn't know how to use it.

Emergencies don't even count in my book. If you want that gun available to that person in an emergency then they need to be taught - as soon as possible - how to handle the gun.

Certaindeaf
June 5, 2013, 02:34 PM
There are lots of different guns and people. You want to be able to hit your target, regardless of the gun. That's code for practice more or use a different gun that might allow you to hit the target, with your level of training.

BYJO4
June 5, 2013, 08:00 PM
If only one gun is to be used for protection, it would have to be one that both individuals can properly use.

md2lgyk
June 5, 2013, 08:08 PM
In the posited scenario, my recommended home defense weapon would be a shotgun.

Archaic Weapon
June 6, 2013, 01:19 AM
I've actually known this situation to come up, and I can say that the people I know chose the small one they could hit with to the bigger one they where unsure of.

If you enjoyed reading about "Proficiency or Inherent Ease?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!