Duracoat experiment


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mljdeckard
June 5, 2013, 01:53 AM
I'm beginning to meddle with Duracoat, and looking for prototypes to try it out on before I start doing it to guns.

This is my old Buckmaster, I bought it back in about 1991, before I first went into the army. I'm looking at adding accents and an overall ACU pattern. Either this will be a masterpiece.....or it will be a disaster and I won't post anything more to the thread. :)

I will clean all the parts to death, brush them off with denatured alcohol, base coat with tan, and then stencil on the ACU pattern. Any advice or appeals to decency before I do it?

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gpurp
June 5, 2013, 02:55 AM
Ha! I used to drool over the Buckmaster back in the 80's when Rambo knives were so cool. At the time I couldn't fathom plunking down nearly $200 for a fancy knife and scabbard. How things have changed. Sorry, I know this was irrelevant to your question. Good luck on the experiment.

mljdeckard
June 5, 2013, 03:16 AM
No, it's cool, I lusted over it as a teenager, and I saw one on sale in a catalog from Atlanta Cutlery for I think $105, I dropped the last of my summer job cash on it. I used it in the field in Germany, I was a survival instructor for a summer, but now I'm in intelligence, and I really don't much like all the gear I HAVE to carry, with trauma plates, water, etc, this is about the heaviest knife on the planet. (I usually keep a Gerber Mk II now.) I took it to Iraq, but I never used it at all. I suppose I'm just reaching the point where it has more than outlived its purpose and paid for itself, I might as well have some fun with it. I got a modern ACU MOLLE sheath for it, I figured I would try to finish it to match.

Most of the advice I have found says it's best to sandblast or at least hand-sand it first.....I'll be getting some sandpaper in the morning.

Valkman
June 5, 2013, 03:43 AM
Sandblasting would be by far the best method, but good luck and I hope it turns out. I did some knives with Brownell's Alumahyde II and they turned out pretty good and this should too. I sandblasted them and then wiped with alcohol and sprayed.

hso
June 5, 2013, 07:41 AM
Considering what that Buckmaster probably would bring to an interested collector I'd leave it alone, sell it, and use the money to purchase some other experimental materials/items.

highorder
June 5, 2013, 10:28 AM
Considering what that Buckmaster probably would bring to an interested collector I'd leave it alone, sell it, and use the money to purchase some other experimental materials/items.

No doubt. Collector value on those Buckmasters is high these days.

mljdeckard
June 5, 2013, 12:01 PM
Never, ever selling it. :)

hso
June 5, 2013, 01:19 PM
Well then, it should look good in its new skin.

dubbleA
June 5, 2013, 05:40 PM
Proper prep is everything with using Duracoat, Cerakote etc...

For best results soak in a good degreaser. I like to use acetone. Next, let the part air dry before blasting with 120 grit aluminum oxide. Doing this will evenly etch the surface to offer a good substrate for the coating to adhere to. Blow off the media dust with dry air. Only handle item with powder free latex or nitrile gloves.

Following these steps will help with good quality results. A reminder for Duracoat is that it usualy take about 2 weeks for it to fully cure and heavy use should be avoided til then.

mljdeckard
June 5, 2013, 05:49 PM
I would like to get a sandblaster, but I don't have one now. Sandpaper this time.

hso
June 5, 2013, 07:21 PM
You could just do a drum and sand manual tumble or motorize like a rock tumbler.

Magoo
June 5, 2013, 07:34 PM
I think the checkered bands are going to be tough to get prepped well without blasting or something like HSO suggested.

IF you were to mask off and leave the checkered bands as, you might have good results with just sandpaper and the like. I'm not saying it's a good look (or bad necessarily) but it might be something to consider.

ETA: There's probably someone in your area that would media blast it for you for a pretty reasonable price. Maybe/likely even approaching the amount of money you spend on various abrasives and gizmos to try to get it prepped. Call around to local body shops and machine shops.

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