Are all Lee pro 1000's this difficult to deal with, or is it just mine?


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gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 03:46 PM
I finally got my case feeder to work, the shell plate lined up, the sizing and decapping die moved to the proper threaded hole, because in the first 2, the cases would not go in, finally got the primers to feed, but now, they will not go over the primer installer pin. Its as if the pin is set to high. They will not slide over in order to get punched in. I cannot find any adjustment on it or any help for this problem on yahoo. I want to get loading. BTW, these are CCI spp for a .38 and the primer holder has 100 primers in it

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Claude Clay
June 8, 2013, 04:08 PM
post a link to the on-line setup instructions...i've set up a number of the machines and changes are often made though the model number is not. I -think- your trouble is a plate washer positioned improperly.

what fixes on page 4 have you tried?

gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 05:05 PM
None of the problems on pag four are there. There is no oil in trough, trough is full, case sensor is hooked up to spring. It seems like the primer pin is not going down far enough to allow the primers to slide on

bds
June 8, 2013, 06:05 PM
Pro 1000 ... got the primers to feed, but now, they will not go over the primer installer pin. Its as if the pin is set to high. They will not slide over in order to get punched in. I cannot find any adjustment on it
Welcome to THR. Relax as you have come to the right place. As indicated in the Pro 1000 support thread posts #65 and #67 (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7877744#post7877744), there are several reasons why primers won't feed properly.

It seems like the primer pin is not going down far enough to allow the primers to slide on
If the primers are not sliding over the primer push rod/pin because the rod/pin is not dropping all the way down in station #2, it is due to improperly installed pin and/or debri at the bottom of the hole.

As shown in the pictures below, top of the primer push rod/pin should be no higher than flush to the primer feed attachment surface.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=156614&stc=1&d=1326176687
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=156612&stc=1&d=1326176411

If it is higher, then the primers will either not slide into station #2 or get tilted and catch the bottom of the shell plate/prevent the shell plate from rotating. At this point, forcing the press to cycle will simply damage the primer, turn the primer sideways/flip the primer and gouge/damage the primer feed attachment surface to the point where the primer feed attachment requires replacement with a new unit.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=156908&stc=1&d=1326574071

To resolve this issue, remove the shell plate and the primer feed attachment. Then pull out the primer push rod/pin with spring and inspect the bottom of the hole. Once the hole is cleared, reinstall the rod/pin and spring. Insert the spring over the longer portion of the rod/pin and lower the rod/pin with the shorter portion pointing down. Press the primer feed attachment back in and reinstall the shell plate.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=156615&stc=1&d=1326177123
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=156616&stc=1&d=1326177123


Be sure the case sensor spring is install in the slot. If the spring hangs on the rod/pin, it will hold the rod/pin down and allow multiple primers to slide into station #2 instead of allowing one primer to slide into station #2 for each resized case that enters station #2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=min59rncM4I

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=178715&stc=1&d=1359512424

If you have not removed the shell plate before, check out the Lee Precision how-to video on removing the shell plate without removing the carrier body (video shows installation but reverse the steps for removal) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8FPB3tu6tg

Finally, operate the ram lever several times to verify that the shell plate timing is set properly (clicks into station as the shell plate carrier reaches the base of the press).

Let us know how it goes.

Potatohead
June 8, 2013, 06:13 PM
nice post BDS..u da man

gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 06:21 PM
BDS thx. Totally new to reloading, a lot more work than I thought it would be. BTW. Everytime I turnaround, there is another accesory I "need". I got the press, than I needed extra dies and turret plates, then I needed a case feed system, then every time I look on Amazon, there is another tool or accesory I "need"!. Is it like this for eveyone? Your pictures are very clear. I have noticed that if I move the case sensor spring to the right or left, the primers fall just right. I will take it apart later and check out what your pics show. thx

bds
June 8, 2013, 06:28 PM
You are very welcome. This is what THR is all about! :D

While you are at it, I would check to make sure the case sensor is working properly. The column of primers should be held out of station #2 until a case passes through the case sensor and drop the primer rod/pin to allow one primer into station #2. Lee Precision has a video on proper installation - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwFIwZGKhl8

Everytime I turnaround, there is another accesory I "need". I got the press, than I needed extra dies and turret plates, then I needed a case feed system
While you do need to buy extra dies and turret for caliber change, the Pro 1000 kit should have come with the case feeder and 4 feed tubes. Yes, highly essential case collator does not come with the kit and need to be purchased separately.

gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 06:45 PM
It did, just the extras-bullet feeders, all the cleaning accesories, tools. Like I said everything I "need!"

bds
June 8, 2013, 06:59 PM
Ooops, I spoke too soon.

If you are going from small cases like 9mm to 40S&W/45ACP, you'll need to buy the large case feeder as the small case feeder won't feed the larger cases.

In addition, you may need the larger case slider (depending on the caliber) also and the bent Z-bar.

Still, the Pro 1000 has the lowest cost of caliber change compared to any other progressive press out there. ;)

gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 07:35 PM
I have all that. I think I found the problem by your previous post. I took the shellplate off and shot some WD on the parts and primers seem to feed now. I have my bullet seating die dialed in, now just have to figure out the powder. I just bought the Lee micrometer powder meter, so I guess there is some type of formula I need to figure out. Thanks again

Schwing
June 8, 2013, 07:48 PM
People either love or hate the Pro 1000. I am the former. Be a little patient and read up on the little tweeks and mods and you will have an awesome press for a fraction of the price. I have had mine for awhile now and have virtually no problems with it.

RealGun
June 8, 2013, 08:41 PM
I don't think using WD around primers is a good idea. Hornady One Shot is made for the purpose.

gsc3zny
June 8, 2013, 08:46 PM
I think I will maybe change it the next time I switch shellplates, goo idea

bds
June 8, 2013, 09:12 PM
Although some use lube on the bottom of the shell plate, I use mine dry.

Here's how I lube my Pro 1000 (I use Breakfree CLP or any weight motor oil):

- Press ram/lever metal contact points

- Before each reloading session, one drop of oil on finger tip and spread on center hex index rod then cycle the ram lever a few times until index is smooth (during reloading session, if indexing becomes less smooth, I apply another drop of oil on the index rod as necessary)

That's it.

Lloyd Smale
June 9, 2013, 10:07 AM
Probably the last press a beginner should start on. Well maybe next to a promaster anyway.

stavman11
June 9, 2013, 10:27 AM
The lee 1000 is a Great System... any new Loader will take some time to get dialed in and set up... i have 3 of them and all just took a few minutes to set up...

Everything you need is in the Box... none come with cleaning supplies, bullet feeders, etc unless ya get the KITS but they dont come with die's. As a new Re-Loader there are lots of little things you SHOULD have... and you will still find things a Year from now...

Be patient... you are loading Rounds.. and patience needs to be adhered to for sure... this is a fun and relaxing hobby, but it is a technical hobby as well, so dont expect to hit a home Run yer 1st at Bat... this isnt Xbox:D

A bullet feeder is nice but wait till you are proficient before ya try that... by your other posts this is your first Time in loading... TAKE YOUR TIME.... Learn... ask questions... and dont try to load 300rds in an hour.....

These are Bullets and are dangerous... treat it accordingly

Good Luck and stay Safe

bds
June 9, 2013, 11:14 AM
For a new reloader learning on the Pro 1000, you can use the press in "single stage" mode or "turret" mode until you become proficient and comfortable with the progressive operation.

To use Pro 1000 in "single stage" mode, remove the case feeder/slider/Z bar and the center hex index or "action" rod and the shell plate won't rotate. The single stage mode is good for doing load development.

To use Pro 1000 in "turret" mode, remove the case feeder/slider/Z bar and manually load one case at a time into station 1. When the case has finished loading through stations 2 and 3, place another case in station 1 and repeat. Loading one case at a time allows you to reload one station at a time and better learn the progressive operation. It is also a good QC check at the start of a reloading session for you to check proper function of each station to verify consistent powder charge drops, OAL, etc.

Keep us posted!

hentown
June 9, 2013, 02:38 PM
Any money you think you're saving with those crappy Lee progressives, you'll spend on Valium. Get a real progressive, and that would mean a progressive made by ANY manufacturer other than Lee.

stavman11
June 9, 2013, 02:48 PM
Any money you think you're saving with those crappy Lee progressives, you'll spend on Valium. Get a real progressive, and that would mean a progressive made by ANY manufacturer other than Lee.

Yer Opinion hentown...

Not all of us agree... But it is America.. yer free ta bash anything ya want...

:neener:

bds
June 9, 2013, 06:24 PM
Any money you think you're saving with those crappy Lee progressives, you'll spend on Valium. Get a real progressive, and that would mean a progressive made by ANY manufacturer other than Lee.
hentown, please do consider this in the spirit of the "High Road" ... Do you know why people start threads like "I bought this XYZ equipment and I can't get it to work properly"?

Because for whatever reason, they already bought the equipment and now they are asking for our assistance. Simply posting that they should have bought another brand press as a solution is like telling someone with a flat tire they should have bought a different brand tire - absolutely no help to the person with the flat tire get back on the road. ;)

Your experience with Lee presses may have indeed been negative and I am sorry to hear that. However, there are many of us who overcame the issues that are inherent to Lee Pro 1000 and successfully use them on an ongoing basis.

Public forums like THR exist so helpful information can be shared on the wonderful network called the "internet" and support threads like the Pro 1000 Problems/Solutions (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7877744#post7877744) exist to help others overcome the same issues we have learned to resolve.

Imagine a new user of Dillon press posting the problem of powder measure drifting and the reply was, "If you bought a Lee press, fixed volumetric Pro Auto Disk powder measure won't drift." How would that reply help the Dillon press user? No, it would absolutely not help. Instead, another Dillon user suggesting to check powder measure drops every 50-100 cycles will. ;)

Peace.

stavman11
June 9, 2013, 06:32 PM
hentown, please do consider this in the spirit of the "High Road" ... Do you know why people start threads like "I bought this XYZ equipment and I can't get it to work properly"?

Because for whatever reason, they already bought the equipment and now they are asking for our assistance. Simply posting that they should have bought another brand press as a solution is like telling someone with a flat tire they should have bought a different brand tire - absolutely no help to the person with the flat tire get back on the road. ;)

Your experience with Lee presses may have indeed been negative and I am sorry to hear that. However, there are many of us who overcame the issues that are inherent to Lee Pro 1000 and successfully use them on an ongoing basis.

Public forums like THR exist so helpful information can be shared on the wonderful network called the "internet" and support threads like the Pro 1000 Problems/Solutions (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7877744#post7877744) exist to help others overcome the same issues we have learned to resolve.

Imagine a new user of Dillon press posting the problem of powder measure drifting and the reply was, "If you bought a Lee press, fixed volumetric Pro Auto Disk powder measure won't drift." How would that reply help the Dillon press user? No, it would absolutely not help. Instead, another Dillon user suggesting to check powder measure drops every 50-100 cycles will. ;)

Peace.

Wow.. Now that's a Post...;)

Great Job bds.... You Da man:)

BSA1
June 9, 2013, 07:09 PM
I agree. That is a great post bds.

I have reloaded many thousands of rounds on my Lee Pro 1000. I do not use the bullet feeder and I only reload one caliber on it.

For no more than it costs I will simply buy another one should I decided to load another caliber in volume.

One change I did make was I reshaped the top of the slot in the primer tray where the primers feed into a funnel shape. It only took a few minutes with a sharp knife and improves the feeding of primers.

Another important factor is your reloading technique. For me it functions best when I use a steady rhythm and consistent pressure when working the ram. But technique it important for any brand of press.

stavman11
June 9, 2013, 07:27 PM
I agree. That is a great post bds.

I have reloaded many thousands of rounds on my Lee Pro 1000. I do not use the bullet feeder and I only reload one caliber on it.

For no more than it costs I will simply buy another one should I decided to load another caliber in volume.

One change I did make was I reshaped the top of the slot in the primer tray where the primers feed into a funnel shape. It only took a few minutes with a sharp knife and improves the feeding of primers.

Another important factor is your reloading technique. For me it functions best when I use a steady rhythm and consistent pressure when working the ram. But technique it important for any brand of press.

Exactly BSA1.... that is why i have 3 lee pro 1000 presses.. easier ta buy another for $170 and have it all set up and just move my Chair to load other rounds..

9mm
.357/38s
.223

i have Bullet feeders for 9mm and .357, but dont use it for .357 yet, but it is for larger/taller lead and will work for the Frangible 9mm lead i have...

Every person i have seen that has had issues with ANY press... is usually solved with a question and some great Help from knowledgeable People.....

Only thing i have done with Mine is use a bungy Cord in Place of the Chain..i kept breaking the chain and found this mod and helped alot...

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y22/stavman11/IMG_20130609_162442_923_zps65aa4ae2.jpg (http://s2.photobucket.com/user/stavman11/media/IMG_20130609_162442_923_zps65aa4ae2.jpg.html)

Ken70
June 9, 2013, 09:05 PM
OP, you might want to download the current LEE catalog and then go to Midway and check out how an accessory is used, whether you might need one. With most things out of stock, it's nice to have a list of all the stuff you need. If in doubt, buy it, Lee isn't going to bleed you dry with their pricing.

jerkface11
June 9, 2013, 09:43 PM
You're new to reloading and you went straight to a progressive? Be extra careful.

Springfield0612
June 10, 2013, 02:52 PM
I reloaded over 1000 .45 ACP rounds this weekend on my Lee Pro 1000 and in addition used it to deprime 1500 more .45 ACP small primer brass that had primer crimps so I could process them before reloading. The only issues I had were the ones that I caused by not using the press correctly.

My advice for a new Pro 1000 user:
-(1) Become very familiar with each stage of reloading. Not just what happens to the case/round in that stage but how the press makes it happen. Once you understand this see numer 2.
-(2) Learn to feel each stage. Do a couple hundred rounds just on stage one (remove the other dies and no primers in the tray), become familiar with the feel you get through the press when something is right and wrong. Same with stage two (remove the depriming/resizing die and no seat/crimp die). Some primer pockets are tighter than others and different primers are different sizes and are harder metal. That is why Lee reccomends not using Federal primers as they are the softest and could detonate, CCI's are at the top for hardness. Repeat instructions for stage 3.
-(3) Now you've masterd #2, IF IT DOESN'T FEEL RIGHT STOP!!!! Don't force it, stop and find out what is wrong. Stopping to recorrect something for 30 seconds will keep you from stopping to reset and fix something that may take 30min - 1 hour.

Good luck!

chrisgo
June 11, 2013, 11:23 PM
They're all that way. The friggin things are generic junk!
I had 2 of them and they were both absolute garbage.
Sold them and bought 4 dillons-650, 2-550's and a square deal.
Haven't had a problem in 15 years!

RealGun
June 12, 2013, 02:38 PM
chrisgo - They're all that way. The friggin things are generic junk!
I had 2 of them and they were both absolute garbage.
Sold them and bought 4 dillons-650, 2-550's and a square deal.
Haven't had a problem in 15 years! How nice for you. Thanks for stopping by.

arizona_cards_11
June 12, 2013, 03:33 PM
I had a Pro 1000 a few years ago and it always gave me a heck of a time. You have to learn the quarks.

I ended up pumping out about 1k rounds of 45acp and sold the press. I then bought a Hornady Classic & Hornady LNL. The LNL is 1000000x easier to setup and to maintain.

bds
June 12, 2013, 04:12 PM
FWIW, many shooters used to say people new to pistols should always start with revolvers because with semi-autos, you had to contend with jamming and could not depend your life on them working reliably.

For some reason, I don't hear those comments anymore directed at new shooters ... I guess humans must have evolved to work wirh "complexities" of semi-auto pistols. :rolleyes:

For me, I would liken the Pro 1000 press as one of semi-autos that has particularly tighter chamber barrel with quicker start of rifling which requires the use of slightly more taper crimp and shorter cartridge lengths. Just because of these features, it does not mean the pistol is a useless junk but that the reloader for such a pistol have the awareness of the pistol's characteristics.

My railed Sig 1911 is such and I have learned to successfully reload for it. I have also learned to successfully operate my 3 Pro 1000 presses and taught many people to reload on them (my last 2 students were ladies in their 40's and 50's even ;)).


Of course, your milege may vary depending on which side of the bed you get out each day.

Peace.

Potatohead
June 12, 2013, 04:40 PM
The lee 1000 is a Great System... any new Loader will take some time to get dialed in and set up... i have 3 of them and all just took a few minutes to set up..

im trying to learn about reloading, not being a smart A here- why would someone have more than one press? to do different calibers i'd imagine? is it that much trouble to change the dies out (or whatever it is you have to do to switch calibers)? because geez that must really be a pain to switch them if its easier to buy a whole 'nother press..what am i missing here?

raddiver
June 12, 2013, 05:02 PM
It takes alot of time to get a load dialed in. From press and die setup to load testing, etc.
For some, the time wasted re-dialing in for a different caliber is not worth it.
For those with the disposable income, it's probably a good fit for the lifestyle.

If i could afford it, id buy another progressive for my 223 loads.
Hell if i had enough money i would buy one for my large pistol also.

Potatohead
June 12, 2013, 05:15 PM
oh. geez it must really take awhile. all of this is kind of hard to grasp without actually having a press to try anything on...maybe reading is only gona edumacate me so much

bds
June 12, 2013, 05:55 PM
why would someone have more than one press? to do different calibers
Because this is a great and free country!

Why does anyone need more than one gun or car? :D

Those of us who have more than one press do simply because we can and make us enjoy our hobby/passion of reloading that much more.

In fact, I even have 3 reloading benches ... 1 in the garage, 1 in the reloading room and 1 in my wife's woman cave. :D

Potatohead
June 12, 2013, 06:36 PM
awesome. sounds good. but for the people who have an extra press because of long die changes, how long do those die changes take or how much trouble are those die changes on a scale of 1 to 10? 10 being ridiculously difficult

dab102999
June 12, 2013, 06:56 PM
awesome. sounds good. but for the people who have an extra press because of long die changes, how long do those die changes take or how much trouble are those die changes on a scale of 1 to 10? 10 being ridiculously difficult
Depending on what type of load you are doing has more to do with it then caliber. For those that find that "perfect" load they have some time into dialing in powder drop, over all length, and crimp.

I have a single stage that I use my for my rifle loads. I like to take my time with them and may spend an hour on 20 or 30 loads. But this is for persise loads. I have a lee LCT that I really like and do my handgun loads on that. I don't load max loads and have found what works for me. I had a lee loadmaster (real old one) and sold it about a 8 months ago with the intention on getting a Horandy or a Dillon. Prices went nuts so I am holding off for now. I would easily add one or two more LCT's but a progressive will give me more rounds per hour for my handguns so will probably hold out for that.

But my basic answer is more presses means more convienance when it comes to reloading. Don't have to have more then one but sure is nice.

stavman11
June 12, 2013, 07:06 PM
It takes alot of time to get a load dialed in. From press and die setup to load testing, etc.
For some, the time wasted re-dialing in for a different caliber is not worth it.
For those with the disposable income, it's probably a good fit for the lifestyle.

If i could afford it, id buy another progressive for my 223 loads.
Hell if i had enough money i would buy one for my large pistol also.
Exactly.... I have swapped before and its not worth my time and effort...

i like to sit down and Load..... and if i choose 9mm or .357 I can do em at basicaly the same time..

Now it would probobly take 10-15 minutes ta change over.... and around $100 for alternate dies and turret and plate.... and then 10-15 to change it back....

well for Me... ill spend the xtra $70 and just roll my chair... and over time the saving will pay for itself... well Not really... does our time ever equate in to savings in reloading...HAHAHA

But thats me....

bds
June 12, 2013, 07:56 PM
how long do those die changes take or how much trouble are those die changes on a scale of 1 to 10? 10 being ridiculously difficult
This is where Pro 1000 shines as caliber change is fast and lowest cost of any progressive presses.

I even have separate Pro Auto Disk powder measures so for 9mm to 40S&W caliber change that uses the same #19 shell plate, I don't even need to change the disk holes. I do the following:

- Remove small case feeder, case slider and Z bar
- Disconnect Pro Auto Disk
- Remove 3-hole turret with 9mm dies
- Install 3-hole turret with 40S&W dies
- Attach Pro Auto Disk
- Install large case feeder, case slider and bent Z bar

That's it for 9mm to 40S&W caliber change and I am ready to load again in about 5 minutes.

For 9mm/40S&W to 45ACP caliber change, the shell plate requires change from #19 to #2 and primer attachment from small to karge, so add a few more minutes.

stavman11
June 12, 2013, 08:03 PM
True sir... true

i dunt DO .40 YET...

again.. im impatient... so I have 3 loaders....LOL

But thats my Limit..... Ill swap out .45 in my .357 WHEN i get a .45.... When i say WHEN... I NEED.. not want.. NEED a 1911

:-)

joeyl
June 12, 2013, 09:20 PM
In addition to the info already posted in this thread, I found this guys videos helpful in figuring out my pro1000 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vamA6qrMFwE As others have posted, I get the best results when I get into a rhythm with it, but there are some times when I think the thing is possessed, which usually means there's some powder that got somewhere it shouldn't have. I have a small compressor and blow out around the primer area when necessary. Yes you have to learn the press, how to take it apart, and how it works, along with maybe a few simple mods like smoothing out the primer chute. I guess that's one of the trade offs for the low price versus the other progressives.

Miata Mike
June 13, 2013, 01:07 AM
I kind of just gave up on priming on press with 9mm, but have 3 Lee Pro 1000 presses dedicated to my top 3 calibers. I figure I can prime ahead at my leisure and pound loads out when I need them.

I don't use them enough to feel good about the priming on press. 45acp has small primers, 9mm has crimped primers, and .38 special has .357.

The presses them selves work very well. The powder dispensers are fantastic for the powders I use.

Potatohead
June 13, 2013, 12:03 PM
thx guys

Hondo 60
June 14, 2013, 01:18 AM
Are all Lee pro 1000's this difficult to deal with, or is it just mine?

Well, I can't say "ALL" because I haven't reloaded on ALL of them.

But yes, my Pro1000 was that difficult as well.
I spent waaaayyyyy more time fiddling with it, than actual reloading time.
I sold mine & bought a Dillon RL-550B.
3 years later & I still LOVE my blue press.

But I REALLY lucked out.
I heard of someone who was selling a 550 that sat unopened for 17 years. (paid $150 for it.)
Original receipt was in the box, dated 1993

Lloyd Smale
June 14, 2013, 07:44 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentown
Any money you think you're saving with those crappy Lee progressives, you'll spend on Valium. Get a real progressive, and that would mean a progressive made by ANY manufacturer other than Lee.

hentown, please do consider this in the spirit of the "High Road" ... Do you know why people start threads like "I bought this XYZ equipment and I can't get it to work properly"?

Because for whatever reason, they already bought the equipment and now they are asking for our assistance. Simply posting that they should have bought another brand press as a solution is like telling someone with a flat tire they should have bought a different brand tire - absolutely no help to the person with the flat tire get back on the road.

Your experience with Lee presses may have indeed been negative and I am sorry to hear that. However, there are many of us who overcame the issues that are inherent to Lee Pro 1000 and successfully use them on an ongoing basis.

Public forums like THR exist so helpful information can be shared on the wonderful network called the "internet" and support threads like the Pro 1000 Problems/Solutions exist to help others overcome the same issues we have learned to resolve.

Imagine a new user of Dillon press posting the problem of powder measure drifting and the reply was, "If you bought a Lee press, fixed volumetric Pro Auto Disk powder measure won't drift." How would that reply help the Dillon press user? No, it would absolutely not help. Instead, another Dillon user suggesting to check powder measure drops every 50-100 cycles will.

Peace.

I dont really agree with this. Im sure some guys are savoy enough to get one running right. More power to you. But you in my opinion do a disservous to a biginner by braggin on those lee press. Id bet 1/2 or more of the people that buy them get so frustrated with them that there stuck in a closet or sold for half what they bought them for. Yup a dillon or honady will give you an occasional headache but not one every time you load a few rounds. I speak from experience as ive to bought into the try to save money idea when i first went progressive and bought a pro 1000 and a loadmaster. Thankfully there just bad dreams now. Ill finish saying this. Anyone that compares the troubles with a lee to the troubles with a dillon has NEVER loaded on a dillon. Its like comparing a yugo to a porche. Now all you lee lovers can come and gang up on me all you like but Ive been there and done that so its going in one ear and out the other ;) Also if your riding hentown for not contributing anything worthwhile to answer the original posters question you might want to read your own post;)

bds
June 14, 2013, 11:20 AM
Id bet 1/2 or more of the people that buy them get so frustrated with them that there stuck in a closet or sold for half what they bought them for. Yup a dillon or honady will give you an occasional headache but not one every time you load a few rounds.

I speak from experience ... and bought a pro 1000 and a loadmaster ... Ill finish saying this. Anyone that compares the troubles with a lee to the troubles with a dillon has NEVER loaded on a dillon.
Lloyd, anyone familiar with my posts should know that I started reloading when I began shooting USPSA matches about 19 years ago. My reloading/shooting mentor was a seasoned Bullseye match shooter and he trained me on both Dillon 550B and Pro 1000 after we covered the reloading basics on a single stage press.

He covered the pro's and con's of each press and we range tested 9mm/45ACP Montana Gold Bullet loads which were my match calibers at that time. Although my inclination was towards the more expensive Dillon press, when I asked my mentor why he also loaded his match loads on the cheaper Pro 1000, he talked about the powder measure on the Dillon "drifting" while the fixed disk holes on the Pro 1000 did not. He taught me that accuracy came from reloading consistency and weighed and grouped bullets by same/less than 1 grain weight and preferred powder charge variance of less than 0.1 grains to qualify for "his" match loads. Yes, I started my USPSA match loads with same sorted head stamp cases, cleaned primer pockets and hand primed primers .004" below flush.

When we range tested the match loads loaded on both Dillon 550B and Pro 1000 presses at 10, 15, 25 and 50 yards, the shot groups were comparable. When I asked my mentor why as I expected the Dillon loads to be more accurate, he said my match guns couldn't tell the difference as long as the reloading components were consistent in my finished rounds. ;)

I ended up buying the Pro 1000 kit from MidwayUSA thinking I would just spend $140 initially while I saved money for Dillon 650/1050 (I did not like the manual index feature of 550B) but my match loads did well enough for me to climb the local USPSA match ladder above 80 percentile in Limited/Limited 10/Production. I was curious and did comparison match load testing with loads loaded on other brand progressive presses but other match shooters were surprised when my Pro 1000 loads outshot some of their match loads. To figure out why, we all went to each others houses and verified powder charge weights and OAL, etc. (we used unsorted/unweighed Montana Gold bullets for these comparison range tests).

What we found that seemed to be the greatest contributing factor was the powder measure drifting. In a typical reloading session of 1000 rounds, some of the Dillon presses drifted by more than several tenth of grain and most users of Dillon presses admitted they checked powder drops every 100 cycles (some even more frequently). When I told other match shooters I only needed to verify the first several powder charges from Pro Auto Disk for consistency and the fixed disk holes dropped with less than .1 gr consistency without drifting with Bullseye/Clays/Titegroup/WST/W231/Universal/WSF/HS-6 powders even after 2000+ round reloading session, some of the match shooters considered checking the powder drops more frequently and a few even considered using the Pro Auto Disk.

Now all you lee lovers can come and gang up on me all you like but Ive been there and done that so its going in one ear and out the other Also if your riding hentown for not contributing anything worthwhile to answer the original posters question you might want to read your own post
This is THR and not every Lee press thread has to end with "Dillon/Hornady is the solution". As I have previously posted, I do not claim the Pro 1000 to be the "best" progressive press out there - Far from it. Is it for everyone? No. But if a particular reloader looking for a progressive press for multiple pistol/short rifle calibers doesn't have the money to buy Dillon/Hornady presses with caliber changes, Pro 1000 offers a viable progressive reloading option.

Don't get me wrong. Had I never met my reloading mentor who showed me the virtues of Pro 1000, I probably would have never considered one and bought either the Dillon 550 or the 650 as they are great progressive presses. I have the financial stability now to be able to afford to buy whatever press I want but do like loading on Pro 1000 enough that I now have 3 set ups for 9mm, 40S&W and 45ACP. Instead of adding 2 more Pro 1000 set ups in the tune of $380, I could have bought a Dillon 550 or LNL AP but after some consideration, I chose to go with having two more dedicated press stations so I can load each caliber without doing any caliber change work. I prefer to load .223/.308 on the C-H 205 single stage press or the Classic Turret (Hey, it's a great country! :D).

Last year, I seriously considered buying a Hornady LNL AP but the problem was I couldn't decide between the Dillon 650 vs the LNL AP. Whenever I think about "upgrading" from the Pro 1000/Classic Turret presses, my wife would ask me, "But honey, will it load more accurate loads?" I had to ponder and admit that it probably won't. But the 500 free bullet offer with the LNL AP press is tempting and I may consider pulling the trigger. :D.

If you started your progressive reloading experience with Pro 1000 and moved on, that's fine. If you want to warn other reloaders to stay away from Pro 1000 based on your experience, that's fine too. This is a free public forum that permits freedom of opinion. But when the posts are made that claim the Pro 1000 is simply "junk" and the only solution is buying another progressive press in the face of quite a few Lee Precision reloaders who learned to make the Pro 1000 work for them, now that's not so "High Road".

Peace.

Lloyd Smale
June 14, 2013, 11:55 AM
I have no doubts you can make match quality ammo on a lee. Its not a matter of quality its a matter of how many a average guy can make before his press goes wacko. A 550 isnt the fastest press in the world but i can load for 12 hours a day for a week and have nothing go wrong. Have you seen a lee that can do that? I also own three lnl progressives and alothough i think there much better the the lees they still take twice as much fooling around to keep running then my 550 does or the 5 square deals i had before i lost them in a fire. Ive loaded on dillons of one sort or another for 20 years and the ONLY time ive ever seen powder charges wander is if using a flake or stick powder. I load all my competitive pistol ammo with ball powders or bullseye the dillons are spot on for that. Bottom line is anything i need to load with stick powders isnt done progresively anyway. Ill close with this and to keep this post from getting out of hand i wont respond anymore. Id bet my house that more competitive ammo is loaded in the US on dillon presses then all other brands combined. If they were inferior i doubt people like brian enos that makes his living off competitive shooting would be pushing them.

bds
June 14, 2013, 12:24 PM
Id bet my house that more competitive ammo is loaded in the US on dillon presses then all other brands combined. If they were inferior i doubt people like brian enos that makes his living off competitive shooting would be pushing them.
Yes, I would too.

I have no doubts you can make match quality ammo on a lee.
Yes, it's not only possible but many match shooters I know do that.

Its not a matter of quality its a matter of how many a average guy can make before his press goes wacko.
My experience has been that my level of understanding/competency improves with greater time spent on a gun or equipment unless user error/abuse of equipment/improper alteration is factored in. This is THR and in the "High Road" fashion, I try to provide the new users of Pro 1000 the critical "need to know" information about Pro 1000 (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7877744#post7877744) so they can get over the learning curve hump and overcome the issues to prevent their Pro 1000 from going "wacko".

For a typical reloading session of 500-1000+ rounds, once the shell plate timing is set and Pro 1000 parts are properly cleaned/lubed, it should continue to operate unless "something out of ordinary" occurs. Typically that's primer feed attachment ramp running dry of primers, shell plate timing not set properly, or press mechanism forced to cycle damaging the index gear parts/primer feed attachment surfaces which will certain affect how well the press operates thereafter. The key is preventative maintenance of proper cleaning and lubrication which applies to all progressive presses to function/operate properly.

I have taught and helped quite a few reloaders on Pro 1000 and when they follow the proper setup, lube and operation procedures, the press functions. I have also helped quite a few Pro 1000 users who had problems and the root causes were typically due to lack of understanding of progressive press operations, lack of proper cleaning/lubrication of press parts, improper shell plate timing, and not fully cycling the ram lever. Pro 1000 is simply just another progressive press that goes up and down while rotating the shell plate on the carrier. Yes, the gravity based primer feed attachment may not drop a primer into station #2 IF there are factors that prevent that from happening but the user of Pro 1000 can keep an eye on the column of primers and when that doesn't happen, remedy the situation.


Lloyd, the OP asked "Are all Lee Pro 1000's this difficult to deal with, or is it just mine?"

Well, Lee Precision doesn't make good Pro 1000s for some reloaders and crappy Pro 1000s for other reloaders. Some claim that Pro 1000 is just a pile of crappy parts slapped together. If that's the case, how can some of the piles of crap operate properly? :scrutiny: The fact that some users are able to successfully use their Pro 1000 on a regular basis (even for some new users) may point to the fact that how well a particular Pro 1000 press functions may be dependent on the user of the press.

For whatever the reason, there are owners of Pro 1000 (like Chevy and Ford owners ... personally I am a Chevy/Buick person) and we are simply trying to help these owners better operate their Pro 1000 so they can enjoy their hobby/passion of reloading and shooting. Arguing about how various features of the Pro 1000 could be better compared to another press won't help the owners of Pro 1000 resolve their problems. Detailing how to resolve individual problems based on actual successful personal/firsthand experience will but past owners of Pro 1000 talking about how they could not get their presses to operate properly won't.

If you are trying to decrease the shot group size with a particular brand/model of pistol, would you listen to someone who can't even hit the target at 15-25 yards with the same pistol? I didn't think so. However, you probably would pay attention to someone who can produce sub 3" shot groups with the same pistol on a consistent basis as the shooter must be doing something right. To the users of Pro 1000 who are experiencing problems, I suggest you listen to actual users of Pro 1000 who learned to successfully operate their presses and not to the ones who never managed to operate their Pro 1000 reliably. It is irrelevant what progressive presses they are currently using or the brand of car they drive to the range. Think about it. ;)

Peace.

bds
June 14, 2013, 02:26 PM
There are plenty of threads that are titled, "Funny thing happened at the range today" ... with stories of squib rounds, double charges, KaBooms and blown up pistols/rifles involving cartridges not necessarily loaded on Lee presses.

Reloading on progressive presses require understanding of reloading basics and safety principles regardless what brand press you use.

Lloyd Smale
June 14, 2013, 04:32 PM
I guess where i differ from some is that reloading and shooting and casting bullets are my only hobbys. I dont have snowmobiles anymore, sold my vette, sold my harley and consentrate on shooting. I want to do it on the best equiptment i possibly can. I chuckle at some who will buy a lee press to save some money but dont think twice about spending 400 bucks on some chrome for there truck or harley. To me the exta a dillon or even hornady cost is money well spent just in the reduced frustration.

Fire_Moose
June 14, 2013, 05:24 PM
How do you lose 5 SDBs in a fire?

I'd expect dillans to turn that charred metal chunk into 5 new presses. No BS.

Sent from my CZ85 Combat

bds
June 14, 2013, 05:38 PM
I dont have snowmobiles anymore, sold my vette, sold my harley and consentrate on shooting. I want to do it on the best equiptment i possibly can. I chuckle at some who will buy a lee press to save some money
I would not consider spending money on the Lee Classic Turret press done to "save money" but deliberate choice purchase to load rifle cartridges with the convenience of swapping dies preset on turrets.

I still do enjoy our Corvette Z06 and quads but not because they are more "economical' means of recreation but our preferred choice of recreation as just the amount of gas to trailer the quads to our favorite dunes is around $150-200 round trip.

Lloyd, I am happy for your Dillon presses but realize that there are others who are just as happy with their Hornady, RCBS, Redding, Lyman, C-H and even Lee presses. For many of us, it is not about having the "best" press but having the choices that allow us to enjoy our hobby/passion regardless whether we make six figure income or five figure income.

Just FYI, I have spent around $50,000 the past 19 years on reloading components alone so the cost of a single progressive press is a small factor. I reload on three Pro 1000 presses by choice and not as a necessity.

Lloyd Smale
June 14, 2013, 07:48 PM
bds im a bit jealous of your z06. There a heck of a machine. My buddys had two and his last was bought new last year and is a rocket! Ive owned 3 a 92lt1 a 96lt4 grand sport and a 99 ls1. they surely werent z06s but i did have fun for a few years with them.

Firemoose the fire was totaly my fault i left one of my casting pots unattened with a bit to much lead in it melting and it over ran onto the bench and caught it on fire and took out everything. I had 5 square deals and a 550 and did contact dillon and they very generously offered to send me either a 550 or a square deal for free. i took the 550 and still have it. Being that it was my fault and not theres and that they just took my word for it without question id have to say you just dont find a better company then that.

Fire_Moose
June 14, 2013, 08:34 PM
Well at least they replaced one of em! Sorry to hear about the blaze.

Sent from my CZ85 Combat

RealGun
June 14, 2013, 09:09 PM
If I already know how to run the less than elite press, I would rather have a new gun than a press change.

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