Should I trim them all to match?


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swampcrawler
June 14, 2013, 11:14 PM
Got 200 pieces of unfired 357 max brass. Should I find the shortest and trim them all to match or will it not affect anything? Brass is kinda hard to come by right now so I want to get the most out of each loading. Don't want to blow up all my brass trying to find an accurate hunting load.

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KansasSasquatch
June 14, 2013, 11:20 PM
Size them all first even if they aren't fired. Then grab about 20 random pieces. If they're all within a few thousandths I wouldn't worry about trimming.

cfullgraf
June 14, 2013, 11:22 PM
Uniform case length will give uniform crimp case to case.

Assuming you are shooting the 357 Max in a revolver, you would want a good roll crimp. If the cases are the same length, it is easier to do.

In a single shot firearm such as a Contender, a taper crimp to remove the mouth belling would probably be adequate. In this case, uniform case length is not as critical.

cfullgraf
June 14, 2013, 11:23 PM
Size them all first even if they aren't fired. Then grab about 20 random pieces. If they're all within a few thousandths I wouldn't worry about trimming.

This too.

swampcrawler
June 14, 2013, 11:35 PM
Thanks guys. It's going to a contender, and all I have is the taper crimp die so hopefully il be ok not using a roll.

Also, totally different question, how do I figure out what overall length to go for to get close to the rifling? Just follow the manual? or iv seen someone mention seating it long with little/no crimp and no powder/prime, chamber, slowly close the action, then you should end up with it kind of seated in the case to touching the lands. Or is this bull?

rcmodel
June 14, 2013, 11:52 PM
Not exactly bull.
Almost, but not quite.

If your case neck tension is even close to as tight as it should be, you will jamb the bullet into the rifling closing it before the bullet slips in the case.

What I would do is seat long.
Then color the bullet ogive with a Magic-Marker, and keep seating shorter until the rifling leade stops rubbing off the marker ink when you carefully hand chamber them.

Then seat a few thousands shorter then that to give yourself a little fudge-factor to make up for variations in bullets.

rc

swampcrawler
June 14, 2013, 11:58 PM
Thanks RC. That certainly clears things up. Until now my only hand loading was just cranking out 45 acp plinking ammo. Trying to be a bit more precise with something I plan to hunt with.

rcmodel
June 15, 2013, 12:22 AM
The magic-marker trick works as well for .45 ACP blasting ammo, or any other caliber.

rc

joneb
June 15, 2013, 01:12 AM
I trim 357 mag brass to 1.280" some of it maybe 1.278 and it is of little concern. I would approach 357 max the same way.
Most manuals give a recommended trim length, I would consider that.

witchhunter
June 15, 2013, 02:49 AM
What are you hunting with your Maximum? Try 296/H110 it seems to work great with a 180 Sierra. I see a guy on here selling some brass, 200 pieces, was thinking of picking it up, could it be you beat me to it? Good luck with your Max, they are sweet.

witchhunter
June 15, 2013, 03:03 AM
Check load manuals, small rifle primers are recommended with some powders in the maximum. because of the higher pressure. PM me for loads if you want.

swampcrawler
June 15, 2013, 08:50 AM
Witch hunter, I believe I did beat you to the brass. And I plan to hunt small feral hogs and small Louisiana whitetail with it. I have Remington small rifle benchrest primers that I picked up for the Max. Still need to get bullets and choose a powder. But I have till November so we should be ok. And I'll shoot you a PM after work this evening

Hondo 60
June 15, 2013, 01:23 PM
Well, I wouldn't bother, but that's just my opinion.
Some wouldn't consider NOT trimming.

gamestalker
June 15, 2013, 07:06 PM
I'm one of those that has always followed the let books to a "T", and I trim all my brass. I don't always trim them to the trim too specs. though. I will find a short one, providing it isn't shorter than trim too spec., and then I trim all the rest to that length.

For wheel gun cartridges that require a roll crimp, it provides for consistent crimps, which eliminates problems at the bench, and at the range. As for AL brass, 9mm and such, I trim just because they have a published specification, and it gives me something else to do, I like this hobby.

And since I load nothing but jacketed bullets, with slow burning powders, and with mostly full tilt loads, I feel that keeping my brass within SAAMI spec. and the same lengths, helps to keep things more predictable and consistent, at least in my opinion.

GS

4895
June 16, 2013, 01:49 AM
IMHO

If you only have 200 pieces of brass, I would resize them all and then trim to proper spec. It really doesn't take all that long and uniformity is a thing of beauty. Ammunition that is properly hand loaded gives the shooter more confidence and probably affects the shooters accuracy.

345 DeSoto
June 17, 2013, 10:26 PM
Consistency, consistency, consistency. The closer to identical that you can make each and every round, the more optimum the accuracy...but I'm a Bench Rest accuracy kind of guy...

flipajig
June 18, 2013, 12:40 AM
I don't shoot the max but I do shoot a tender in 44 mag. It was giving me fits in the accuracy department and was asking the same questions that you are. There is another Fourm page it's called Specialty Pistole Fourm great folks over there lots of max shooters also my point is you want to seat the bullet at what the books advise when loading straight walled pistol rounds forget what you know about loading rifle rounds. Also I use a roll crimp not a taper crimp.
Flip.

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