Gas Check???


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Bruno2
June 17, 2013, 08:57 PM
What exactly is the purpose of a gas check?

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Uniquedot
June 17, 2013, 09:22 PM
It prevents gas cutting and therefore prevents leading although it may not totally eliminate it. It also strengthens the base of the bullet for higher pressure loads.

GLOOB
June 17, 2013, 09:51 PM
^ I've also heard the theory that they simply scrape out the lead fouling, leaving the barrel clean. (This is clearly wrong, because gas checks also affect accuracy.) Or that they grip the rifling at higher speeds to prevent the rifling from stripping the surface of the bullet.

The end result is pretty clear. You can shoot bullets faster (maybe 1800-2200 fps) without leading, and while still maintaining accuracy.

Bruno2
June 17, 2013, 10:03 PM
I am having issues with smoky loads from cast bullets in my 38 spl 642. They get the gun extremely nasty. It is a pain to clean and somewhat stains the finish. Would a gas check be a solution?

GLOOB
June 17, 2013, 10:14 PM
It might help if it allowed you to use less lube. The lube spits out the cylinder gap on a revolver. Lube filled with powder residue. As for smokey, lower temps sometimes help a little with that. Or so it's been said. Maybe you're using a hotter/faster powder than necessary.

Probably the main variable in terms of how dirty it gets your revolver is the choice and amount of bullet lube?

rcmodel
June 17, 2013, 10:31 PM
Keith and others pretty much proved a gas check was both unnecessary, and undesirable with magnum class revolver loads.

Unless the sprue cut-off on the base of the cast bullet is perfectly flat, the base of the bullet with the gas check crimped in place won't be perfectly flat either.

And that ruins accuracy as much or more then slight leading.

Maybe gas-checks are good in rifle calibers at higher velocity then you can get out of a .44 Magnum revolver though?

But the long range BP shooters don't use them either.

rc

Bruno2
June 17, 2013, 11:20 PM
I have tried a few different powders and I am trying to load powder puffs. So how do you keep cast lead revolver ammo from smoking so much?

BullfrogKen
June 17, 2013, 11:31 PM
Lead rounds are going to smoke more than jacketed bullets. It can't be avoided. But it can be minimized.


Exactly what powders and lubes are you using?

Bruno2
June 18, 2013, 12:15 AM
I bought the cast bullets and I want to say it was from rocky mountain. So I have no idea what kind of lube comes on them. I have used Clays, titegroup, Universal and HP-38.

Bruno2
June 18, 2013, 12:19 AM
I am sorry they are Mastercast bullets.

rcmodel
June 18, 2013, 02:40 AM
Doesn't matter much.

Bullet lube grease burns off and makes smoke when hit in the butt with 15,000 PSI and white hot burning powder gas while zipping through a barrel at 900 FPS and the resulting friction & heat making it smoke off.

rc

carbine85
June 18, 2013, 11:21 AM
For what it's worth I just started reloading with cast bullets for my M1 Carbines. I was advised not to use gas checks and the bullets made specifically for the M1 Carbine don't have the groove in them. I have 4 different loads made up but haven't tried any of them yet.

243winxb
June 18, 2013, 05:31 PM
I am having issues with smoky loads from cast bullets in my 38 spl 642. They get the gun extremely nasty. It is a pain to clean and somewhat stains the finish. Would a gas check be a solution?
A gas check does help seal the bore. How much it will reduce the dirt needs testing. 700X does produce more smoke for me, when compared to Bullseye powder. When the bullet jumps from the cylinder to barrel is when most happens. The gap between the barrel & cylinder, if on the large side may produce more dirt. Normal gap is .004" to .009"

Bruno2
June 18, 2013, 08:38 PM
The smoke smutted my finish up so bad that I didn't bother loading anymore of the cast boolits.

rcmodel
June 18, 2013, 08:44 PM
Smutted up your finish??

Good lord man?
What would you have done if you came of age in the 1920's, or 40's, or 60's like I did.

You could not buy jacketed revolver ammo from any factory.
Or jacketed bullets for reloading them.

You shot lead, and you learned how to clean your guns.

It ain't no big deal!

rc

Bruno2
June 18, 2013, 08:48 PM
I need a blued gun to shoot those out of. I guess I need a GP 100. The satin finish on my 642 was extremely hard to clean after several of those went through the gun. I am serious some of it might still be on there.

I have a bunch of cast for my 9mm and 40 S&W as well. Do the autos make as big of a mess?

rcmodel
June 18, 2013, 08:51 PM
If you have a stainless gun, buy a Lead-Away cloth.

If you have a blue gun, Hoppe's #9 and a cloth patch will take it off so you never knew it was there.

The stains on the cylinder face and top strap on your stainless gun are not from the lead bullets anyway.

You will get the same powder burn stains shooting jacketed ammo.

rc

GLOOB
June 18, 2013, 09:26 PM
Do the autos make as big of a mess?
Nope. As far as gun cleaning goes, they're just the same as jacketed, with the exception of possible barrel/chamber fouling. (If you get a good bullet/load, barrel fouling is a non issue). Smoke can also be quite low in semiautos.

Shrinkmd
June 18, 2013, 10:03 PM
Get some Mpro7 and a brass bristle brush. Cleans up nicely, even the cylinder face if you want to bother.

Jim Watson
June 18, 2013, 10:12 PM
"But the long range BP shooters don't use them either."

We aren't allowed to, not in NRA sanctioned shoots.
But you will find a lot of different over powder card wads in black powder cartridges.
I just use the hard fiber (looks like pipe gasket material) Walters Wads, but some shooters prefer polyethylene. Some will put a paper wad between the card wad and the bullet to keep the card wad from sticking to bullet lube... that should have been cleaned off in the first place.
Grease cookies are seldom seen except under paper patched bullets.

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