Light recoiling, 6-6.5mm calibers for long range shooting


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alfon99
June 24, 2013, 04:46 PM
Any suggestions? It will be for long range shooting and maybe for axis deer hunting.

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HOOfan_1
June 24, 2013, 04:56 PM
.243 Winchester, .260 Remington, 6.5x55 Swedish

horsemen61
June 24, 2013, 05:05 PM
I have the 6.5 x 55 Swedish Mauser built on a k98 action so it is much stronger than the original 1896 action as for a deer gun/long range it rocks if you reload ask kachok he has some good loads for it.

sixgunner455
June 24, 2013, 05:09 PM
what can you get in uruguay? Probably .243 Win.

allaroundhunter
June 24, 2013, 05:31 PM
Most all of them are light recoiling, that is what is helping them gain a lot of popularity in long range competition... And the fact that they are very accurate.

chaser_2332
June 24, 2013, 05:49 PM
6mm creedmoor, all the speeds of a 243 with better barrel life

j1
June 24, 2013, 05:55 PM
6.5 Creedmore. Supposed to be utterly fantastic at long range and low recoil.

stubbicatt
June 24, 2013, 05:56 PM
I am not certain in Uruguay the availability of ammunition and components, whether you have better access to US source components for reloading, or European sources.

I am in process of assembling the parts etc. for a 6.5x47 Lapua, whose components originate in Finland, other than the primers. As I understand it, the 6.5x47 Lapua is ballistically very similar to the 6.5 Creedmoor, which is rapidly gaining acceptance here in the western U.S. Depending on availability of ammunition and components, I would be comfortable with either of them. If they are equally available, I would choose the Lapua offering as IME, the Lapua components are of better quality than readily available U.S. offerings, and the Lapua has a small rifle primer, which should make the primer pockets more durable assuming similar, high, pressures. From what I have read, the Hornady brass for the Creedmoor seems to suffer from undue primer pocket expansion.

Else there is the 260 Remington and the 6.5 Grendel, with the latter being of very mild recoil characteristics, and based on the 7.62x39 cartridge.

Hope this helps.
Regards,
Stubb

25cschaefer
June 24, 2013, 06:03 PM
.260 Rem, less recoil than the Swede and Creedmore and only about 50fps behind the Swede in most loadings and is right there with it with some powders. It is also readily available at Wal-Mart, if you don't reload, even right now. If you do reload and have a 308, you can just neck them down in a pinch.

chaser_2332
June 24, 2013, 06:08 PM
How is a 260 less recoil than a 6.5creedmoor

MtnCreek
June 24, 2013, 06:11 PM
From what I have read, the Hornady brass for the Creedmoor seems to suffer from undue primer pocket expansion.

I think that's only an issue when it's hot-rodded. I've got some brass on it's 5th firing and it's still tight as ever. I'm pretty new to creedmoor, so YMMV.

JDGray
June 24, 2013, 06:33 PM
How about 6mm BR?

HOOfan_1
June 24, 2013, 06:50 PM
How is a 260 less recoil than a 6.5creedmoor

Or 6.5x55...all three are pretty much dead even

tactikel
June 24, 2013, 08:57 PM
.260-- little recoil, and I watched a guy put 3 rounds into 0.11" at 100 yds.

alfon99
June 24, 2013, 09:03 PM
I am not certain in Uruguay the availability of ammunition and components, whether you have better access to US source components for reloading, or European sources.

I am in process of assembling the parts etc. for a 6.5x47 Lapua, whose components originate in Finland, other than the primers. As I understand it, the 6.5x47 Lapua is ballistically very similar to the 6.5 Creedmoor, which is rapidly gaining acceptance here in the western U.S. Depending on availability of ammunition and components, I would be comfortable with either of them. If they are equally available, I would choose the Lapua offering as IME, the Lapua components are of better quality than readily available U.S. offerings, and the Lapua has a small rifle primer, which should make the primer pockets more durable assuming similar, high, pressures. From what I have read, the Hornady brass for the Creedmoor seems to suffer from undue primer pocket expansion.

Else there is the 260 Remington and the 6.5 Grendel, with the latter being of very mild recoil characteristics, and based on the 7.62x39 cartridge.

Hope this helps.
Regards,
Stubb
Well, the main problem with 6.5x47 Lapua is ammo availability, and if you say it is ballistically very similar to 6.5 Creedmoor, which is easier to get, I guess 6.5 Creedmoor is the way to go.

25cschaefer
June 24, 2013, 09:06 PM
Sorry guys, I was looking at old data from the 6.5 Panther, it and the 6.5 308 A-Square, are the same design. It looks like the 260, 6.5x47, 6.5x55, and the Creedmoore are about even withthe right loading.

redneck2
June 24, 2013, 09:19 PM
Kinda depends....You looking for a factory chambering and factory available ammo, or is it a custom build with hand loaded ammo??

My S-I-L has a Savage in 6BR. Exceptionally accurate. Rifle would be too heavy to carry hunting, but it has zero, and I mean virtually zero recoil. He's getting it set up for 1,000 yard shooting.

Txhillbilly
June 24, 2013, 09:26 PM
The 6.5x55 Swede would probably be the easiest to find factory ammo for since the caliber has been around for over 120 years.

I shoot the 260 Remington and the 6.5 Creedmoor,and like both calibers.The performance between them is pretty much a tie,but with the Creedmoor,you can load the longer match bullets out to the barrel lands and still be well within overall length limits on most magazine's.
Seating the same bullet to the lands in the 260,the rifle is made into a single shot since the overall cartridge length is longer than the magazine.

Hornady has improved on the Creedmoor brass from what I've noticed. The early brass did have primer pocket issues with the pockets stretching after a couple loading's,but the last couple boxes that I've tried seem to be better.
I also re-size 22-250 brass for the Creedmoor,and it works good.

viking499
June 24, 2013, 09:42 PM
Tx, what goes into resizing the 22-250 brass to Creedmoor?

What is the advantage of the Creedmoor or BR over the 243?

25cschaefer
June 24, 2013, 09:56 PM
The 6.5mm bullets will have better ballistic coeffiecents than the 6mm and there are bigger bullets available as well.

Necking up a 22-250 might cause problems with neck thickness; necking up 243 or necking down 7mm will give the best results.

Kernel
June 24, 2013, 10:00 PM
I'd think .243 Win and .260 Rem would, by far, be the easiest to get - either factory loaded or components. They’re both within a 99.0 percentile of anything mentioned above in their respective caliber. Heck, there's a 99.0% equivalency between these two when compared to each other! There's really not much real world difference between all medium capacity 6-6.5mm chamberings. Unless you just want something exotic and different.

6.5x55 is not a bad choice, but many South & Central American countries will forbid military chambering.

WardenWolf
June 24, 2013, 10:00 PM
There is 6.5 JAP, and the Type 38 Arisaka rifles that fire them can often be found with excellent bores. The rifle can be loaded with nuclear levels; indeed, even when bored out to .30-06 PO Ackley wasn't able to blow one up. They can be very accurate shooters. If you handload, you won't have too much of a problem feeding it.

chaser_2332
June 24, 2013, 10:13 PM
Better barrel life through superior case design with the 6mm creedmoor

MichaelK
June 25, 2013, 06:17 PM
Since you're a South American, first I have to ask why not the 7X57mm? It was the offical service cartridge of so many South American countries, with the same history that the .30-06 has for us. It's mild, and can shoot very high ballistic coefficent bullets.

Are semi-auto rifles legal in Uruguay? If so, I'd go first with the 6.5 mm Grendel, which is a wonderful, wonderful cartridge. Second choice would be the 6.5X55mm. I've got both. Bought my Swedish Mausers back when they were 80$.

tuj
June 25, 2013, 06:28 PM
How about 6mm BR? +1. Super accurate.

Txhillbilly
June 25, 2013, 08:59 PM
Tx, what goes into resizing the 22-250 brass to Creedmoor?

What is the advantage of the Creedmoor or BR over the 243?
Since my Creedmoor sizing die is a bushing die,I resize the necks with my 260 Remington neck sizing die and then run them in the Creedmoor die. I check the neck thickness,and if needed I turn the necks.

25cshaefer,I use 243 brass for all of my 260 Remington brass,but 22-250 works better for the Creedmoor since the Creedmoor is a lot smaller length in the body of the shell than a 308 family cartridge.

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