record your guns!


PDA






rondog
June 29, 2013, 05:08 PM
We all know it's a good idea to keep a record of your guns in case of theft or natural disasters, so I made up this Excel file. It's pretty simple, just save this Master copy on your hard drive, then open it up and rename it for each of your guns, like "Ruger 10/22". Then you just fill in the blanks with the info, and paste digital photos in the rest of the spreadsheet. There's four pages, three and a half pages are for photos.

Create a folder on your PC called Gun Records, or whatever you want to call it, and save this Master file and all your individual gun files in it. Then you can copy that folder to a CD, a thumb drive, an external drive, etc. The more places you keep a copy, the better. Just remember where they are and keep them secure. And whenever you update the master folder with a new gun, remember to update the copies as well.

Here you go. I had to ZIP it because we can't attach Excel files directly. You should be able to tweak this however you wish.

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Arkansas Paul
June 29, 2013, 05:14 PM
Thank you for sharing that. I saved it and will use it immediately.

Potatohead
June 29, 2013, 05:26 PM
thats awesome dude. thanks. remember to "back up" or put on a zip/thumb/jump drive

orionengnr
June 29, 2013, 05:32 PM
We all know it's a good idea to keep a record of your guns

Yet again, opinion stated as fact.

"We all" know no such thing.

What I do know is that I have no desire to provide any potential miscreant (whether a local break-in or computer thief or governmental entity) with a shopping list.

Better yet, my insurance company does not require serial numbers...they don't even ask for them.

rondog
June 29, 2013, 05:39 PM
Yet again, opinion stated as fact.

"We all" know no such thing.

What I do know is that I have no desire to provide any potential miscreant (whether a local break-in or computer thief or governmental entity) with a shopping list.

Better yet, my insurance company does not require serial numbers...they don't even ask for them.

Don't want to use it? Then don't use it. But there's no reason to be nasty or snarky.

Deltaboy
June 29, 2013, 05:47 PM
Thanks for the reminder I got to update some photos and data with my collection.

threefeathers
June 29, 2013, 06:45 PM
Thank you, I have a register book and will supplement it with this.

Odd Job
June 29, 2013, 06:54 PM
No harm in keeping a spreadsheet and photos of your guns. You can always encrypt the files...

Reloadron
June 29, 2013, 06:57 PM
Thanks for sharing that. Useful tool for many members. This may sound like a dumb question but will this run for people who do not have MS Excel installed? Meaning can they write to the Excel Workbook?

Ron

Torian
June 29, 2013, 07:21 PM
I can agree it would be very helpful in the event you need to make a claim for stolen firearms. I recently had a discussion with my insurer (USAA) about firearm coverage. They require descriptions and serial # of all firearms, with photos recommended, and will not cover the theft of ANY ammo.

That last part kind of rubbed me the wrong way, given the high cost of ammo these days, and the amount that many serious gun owners keep stockpiled.

ridgerunner1965
June 29, 2013, 07:32 PM
what id did was a bit more low tech. i made a list of all guns with serial numbers, condition,approx value and any flaws or identifying marks.on paper.made 4 copies. gave one to my brother and my son and they put them in ther safes.put one in my safe and another hidden in the outbuildings.

if you think your insurance is going to pay off in case of loss of your guns then you had better check your policy. most will pay but have a low limit like maybe 1000$ worth.pays to chek.

Shadow 7D
June 30, 2013, 04:07 AM
Actually, if you have the original receipt, attach it to the gun entry (you can do this in MS access) and better yet, consider getting the list sent to your insurance, yeah I know, more people knowing, BUT it's an off site pretty secure storage in case something happens.

Many insurance co. have an online 'inventory' capablity for high value items.

wickedsprint
June 30, 2013, 04:20 AM
I cut and paste the serial numbers to an email every time the list is updated.

jim in Anchorage
June 30, 2013, 04:46 AM
Yet again, opinion stated as fact.

"We all" know no such thing.

What I do know is that I have no desire to provide any potential miscreant (whether a local break-in or computer thief or governmental entity) with a shopping list.

Better yet, my insurance company does not require serial numbers...they don't even ask for them.
orionengnr is offline Report Post

Oh brother:rolleyes: So put the records in PVC pipe and bury it. Like you did your guns.

firesky101
June 30, 2013, 07:46 AM
wickedsprint has the right idea. There is free online storage available to all of you, just email the file to yourself and you will be able to access it anywhere.

Thermactor
June 30, 2013, 08:18 AM
The chart should have a place to fill in on details about the boat, its registration number, date of the accident, and the value of the loss.

RetiredUSNChief
June 30, 2013, 08:56 AM
Yet again, opinion stated as fact.

"We all" know no such thing.

What I do know is that I have no desire to provide any potential miscreant (whether a local break-in or computer thief or governmental entity) with a shopping list.

Better yet, my insurance company does not require serial numbers...they don't even ask for them.


Let's keep this in perspective, shall we?

Methinks if one can keep one's firearms safe from theft or the government, then one can keep a tiny piece of paper or a tiny file safe from the same.

Especially since there are so many more ways to easily hide and protect such a tiny piece of paper or file than a big, bulky gun.

BearGriz
June 30, 2013, 09:45 AM
I keep mine as a google doc.

Of course that means the NSA probably knows what guns I have. ;)

But I can access it from any computer (including my phone) that has the Internet. If my house burns down or my computer hard drive dies, I don't lose the information.

Plus you can have google drive sync with your phones and computers (just like Dropbox) so it stores an offline copy on each specified device. Then you don't need the Internet to access it. It just uses the Internet to sync and rectify the files if you update it from any device.

JSH1
June 30, 2013, 09:52 AM
Great advice. I was just thinking last week that I should write down the serial numbers of my guns in case they are lost in a fire or stolen. I want to be able to report the serial number to the police so if it turns up later they will know it was stolen.

It is also a good idea to keep an inventory of everything in your house. It is a big task but in the case of a total loss, the insurance company will only cover what your can remember to claim. A good first step is to go through your house with a digital camera and take pictures of every room and the contents of every drawer, cabinet, and closet.

herrwalther
June 30, 2013, 10:17 AM
A little bit more confusing than the spreadsheet I already have but has some good points to incorporate into mine. I'll just use yours since mine is 2 years out of date anyway.

alsaqr
June 30, 2013, 10:22 AM
All the guns i've owned in the past 20 years are in an Excel file along with serial numbers, make of scope, date disposed of, etc. i have a photo album of my antique Winchester collection and my more valuable modern guns.

OilyPablo
June 30, 2013, 10:34 AM
I use this:

http://www.atf.gov/files/publications/download/p/atf-p-3312-8.pdf

Simple and works for me. From back when the ATF was "friendly"........hahahahaha

I just print a new blank page when needed. I keep a copy elsewhere AND in the safe.....I have quite a few pages now.

Trent
June 30, 2013, 11:46 AM
I still use A&D spreadsheet. When I closed down my gun shop I ran a "final" copy off.

A few months later I found myself still using it... to take inventory and plan "what can I sell to get the next wonderthunderstick"

Now it's been 4 years, and I'm still tracking my 'inventory' with it.

I also use spreadsheets for reloading data (for rifle, not pistol)

Safetychain
July 1, 2013, 12:51 AM
I'm not really worried about NSA but it did made me think about their capability to read e-mails.

"Thanks for sharing that. Useful tool for many members. This may sound like a dumb question but will this run for people who do not have MS Excel installed? Meaning can they write to the Excel Workbook?"

Google "Open Office". It is free and just about as capable as MS Office Suite. I downloaded the Record Sheet Master and opened it fine in Open Office Calc. I've kept my own spreadsheet in Open Office.

My only thought, the way I did mine, is to have one spreadsheet for all the guns instead of a bunch of files, one for each gun. Mine has each gun on its own line where the cell with the pic has to be picked which brings up the full sized picture. You do have some data fields that I will be adding to my spreadsheet. And yours does look significantly more professional. Putting a gun per line with large pics does make printing it out with pictures impossible, or at least I haven't figured a way to do it yet. Thanks for providing your work!!!

Also I picked up a 120 gig SB drive for under $20 on a Christmas sale that holds all records with plenty to spare.

22-rimfire
July 1, 2013, 09:10 AM
I have had a complete list for years on an Excel spreadsheet. If a gun comes home with me, it's on the list.

Considering the recent NSA revelations, I would be hesitant to trust saving stuff on emails. As far as I'm concerned, nothing sent in emails is private.

Ryanxia
July 1, 2013, 12:42 PM
wickedsprint has the right idea. There is free online storage available to all of you, just email the file to yourself and you will be able to access it anywhere.
As long as everyone here is aware that when you put anything on your computer (online or not) there is a chance of it being viewed by others, e-mails especially. If you're OK with that risk then great.

If you're like the rest of us just hide that list inside your tinfoil hat, no one will find it there. :D

Mikee Loxxer
July 1, 2013, 01:36 PM
Thanks rondog! It was very kind of you to post this.

Certaindeaf
July 1, 2013, 01:43 PM
I was going to say much the same as post #27.

95XL883
July 1, 2013, 02:10 PM
Excel has a built-in file encryption. I'm told it is excellent and don't forget the password because it won't be opened without it. In Excel 2007 or 2010, click on file, there should be a tile in the middle labeled Protect Workbook. Click on that tile and choose Encrypt with Password. If you create a nonsensical password with a combination of numbers, letters and special characters, it will be virtually unbreakable. HTH.

VegasAR15
July 1, 2013, 02:20 PM
It is a good idea and something that every gun owner should do. I think it is a good idea to have electronic and hard copies in several locations.

To the tin foil hatters. You have to ask yourself, is it more likely that you will have a gun stolen, or more likely that the NSA or whoever will intercept your "shopping list" so that they can confiscate all of your guns easier? Or maybe you die and your next of kin is trying to inventory all of your firearms? I plan on putting together a master list with every gun, what I paid for it and what its current estimated value is. If a gun gets stolen and you don't even have a serial number to give the police, do you really think there is any chance of getting it back if all you can tell them is, well, it was a Glock 19 and it was black.

Everyone should have a copy of your list that is NOT in your gun safe. Your safe might get stolen and there goes your list.

rondog
July 1, 2013, 02:35 PM
I'm glad that most of you like it, I only intended to offer it as a courtesy. One of the reasons I created it was to help my wife/heirs figure out what was what in the event of my untimely demise, as well as create a reference record in the event of theft or other loss. I just figured that pertinent info and detailed photos would be a good thing to have around.

Now if I can just get my lazy self in gear to get my OWN completed! It's the photo-taking.....I'm just too anal to use snapshots, I want good quality, detailed photos.

Trent
July 1, 2013, 03:36 PM
Excel has a built-in file encryption. I'm told it is excellent and don't forget the password because it won't be opened without it. In Excel 2007 or 2010, click on file, there should be a tile in the middle labeled Protect Workbook. Click on that tile and choose Encrypt with Password. If you create a nonsensical password with a combination of numbers, letters and special characters, it will be virtually unbreakable. HTH.

No, it's not even close to being virtually unbreakable, or even remotely secure.

We routinely break MS Office encryption / password protection at work when people suffer the "error between keyboard and chair" and forget the passwords they've set on worksheets.

If you're going to encrypt something, there are MUCH better ways to do it.

RetiredUSNChief
July 1, 2013, 03:40 PM
As long as everyone here is aware that when you put anything on your computer (online or not) there is a chance of it being viewed by others, e-mails especially. If you're OK with that risk then great.

If you're like the rest of us just hide that list inside your tinfoil hat, no one will find it there. :D

Oh, come on! You can make a paper list and hide it or you can make an electronic file and either physically hide it (on a thumb drive or tiny Micro SD card), or electronically encrypt it, or both.

If you want to get rid of your electronic copy on a computer, shred it using a file shredder.

If you don't want it on the internet, then don't post it there...at least without encryption.

Electronic files are so easy to conceal and protect that it's insane. If people don't take the necessary steps to do so, then that's their fault.

Much like making a hand written record and then leaving it out on a table somewhere for people to find.

;)

mgmorden
July 1, 2013, 03:43 PM
No, it's not even close to being virtually unbreakable, or even remotely secure.

We routinely break MS Office encryption / password protection at work when people suffer the "error between keyboard and chair" and forget the passwords they've set on worksheets.

If you're going to encrypt something, there are MUCH better ways to do it.

While I'll agree that there are better ways to go about this (an encrypted volume via TrueCrypt being the best solution IMHO), the encryption in Office 2007 and 2010 IS fairly secure (128-bit AES).

I've a feeling if you're breaking them that easily most of your users are using Office 2003 documents.

Trent
July 1, 2013, 03:49 PM
While I'll agree that there are better ways to go about this (an encrypted volume via TrueCrypt being the best solution IMHO), the encryption in Office 2007 and 2010 IS fairly secure (128-bit AES).

I've a feeling if you're breaking them that easily most of your users are using Office 2003 documents.

No.

Dictionary attack for the easy ones, then rainbow tables for trickier ones, followed by GPU acceleration brute force if they used something really tricky. We can crack AES128 fast at my office. I run HPC clusters; throw a few hundred thousand cores at it, and it falls in seconds / minutes.

(Edit; there is a BIG difference between cracking a "password" based key and cracking a much more complex certificate-based protection. My advice, skip the password based crap - use a third party encryption tool that can use the entire byte range with a 2048 bit or 4096 bit key, instead of a very comparably short word or phrase type key limited to A-Z,a-z,0-9,and special symbols)

ThorinNNY
July 1, 2013, 04:02 PM
I would recommend having the serial numbers numbers tattoed on one`s brain, but that leaves one with the problem of properly disposing of the tattoo artist ;). Hmmm, maybe Cruncher the Doberman wouldn`t object if I shaved a small patch of his fur off, and tattooed those serial numbers on his skin.Just keep the bald patch covered with a bandage until his fur grows back.:uhoh:

HankR
July 1, 2013, 04:47 PM
put the records in PVC pipe and bury it. Like you did your guns.



If you're like the rest of us just hide that list inside your tinfoil hat, no one will find it there.

Might I reccomend a hybrid approach? Wrap your PVC pipe in tinfoil, to keep out the moisture and keep in the nasty thought-rays.

22-rimfire
July 1, 2013, 10:48 PM
Put you list in a pvc pipe with sealed ends. That should keep it pretty secure buried in the yard until the feds start digging. The problem is that I have to revise mine from time to time.

Put some metal inside so you can find it with a metal detector.... or someone else can. :D

Ignition Override
July 2, 2013, 12:37 AM
What are the chances that USAA Insurance could lose the electronic list of guns which are insured?

Trent
July 2, 2013, 11:01 AM
What are the chances that USAA Insurance could lose the electronic list of guns which are insured?

Depends entirely on their network security, and the competency of the agency that audits that security. :)

gamestalker
July 2, 2013, 11:23 AM
I have one very similar to that, nice work. But I also keep a hard copy in my fire safe just in case.

GS

Ryanxia
July 2, 2013, 11:49 AM
Electronic files are so easy to conceal and protect that it's insane. If people don't take the necessary steps to do so, then that's their fault.

;)
I'm not trying to say it will go poof and be in someone else's hands, just that there IS a chance. Even when you protect/encrypt/hide files it's not terribly difficult to get around it for someone knowledgeable. Is it likely to happen? Nope, but if I know you have a list on your computer that I want, I'll get it.

Archaic
July 2, 2013, 12:50 PM
I've got a hand written one I've been keeping for a few years, but I'm sure its behind. This just reminded me to update it, print it in invisible ink, memorize it, eat it, then hide myself in a safe.

I also have digital pics of most of my toys. I should check my insurance policy.

RetiredUSNChief
July 2, 2013, 04:25 PM
I'm not trying to say it will go poof and be in someone else's hands, just that there IS a chance. Even when you protect/encrypt/hide files it's not terribly difficult to get around it for someone knowledgeable. Is it likely to happen? Nope, but if I know you have a list on your computer that I want, I'll get it.

Granted...except that is true for hard copy documents as well, even more so in my opinion.

Electronic copies have added advantages that hard copies do not...which really offset any perceived disadvantages.

For instance, if you think that it's easy to decrypt files that properly use good and time-tested commercially available encryption software, then you've got another think coming.

And anybody who thinks security ends there is sadly mistaken...this is another area of vulnerability. Multiple layers of security make access to important files incrementally more difficult because each level of security provides an added level of protection against methods that others are vulnerable to.

For example, secure networks don't just rely on firewalls and electronic security access programs. They're also set up to be independent of other networks, and the stations which access them are also in controlled areas. You cannot hack through a firewall by an independent computer if that computer has no physical access to the network.

The same philosophy applies to electronic files. If all you take is the bare minimum, then you're setting yourself up for a single-point failure. Just like hand writing a list and then not securing it physically, for example.

I have an older laptop, for example, that I could set up as a stand-alone computer and never connect it to a network. If I really wanted to be secure, I could set it up to boot up and run on an operating system installed on a flash drive. I could create and save any files I want and save them as heavily encrypted files on flash drives or micro-SD cards, which I can then remove and physically secure elsewhere. I can shred existing files/erase hard drive space using a shredding program rated to DOD standards. If I was really concerned, I could also physically destroy the laptop hard drive by a variety of means.

In the end I would have any data I wanted secured in encrypted flash drives or micro-SD cards which are so small that physically securing them presents any number of possibilities that could frustrate even the most dedicated search for them.

This is why I roll my eyes at a lot of people who don tin hats about how electronic files are "so easy to hack". They're ONLY easy to hack IF they can be found, IF they can be accessed, and IF they can be decrypted.

;)~

Akita1
July 2, 2013, 09:57 PM
Much thanks Rondog & good point. Love me some Excel. I have that folder on two separate hard drives I maintain - one in the safe and one in the briefcase. I do not subscribe to the boat accident weakness, and neither does the BATFE.

Actually an excellent idea for NFA items, along with a laminated copy of your trust when the Game Warden rolls in and says "why are you shooting hogs with a silencer?" Beside the obvious answer (depending upon the State of course), here's my reason brother…do I have to explain why hogs and deer don't mix?

rondog
July 2, 2013, 10:11 PM
Wow, you computer experts amaze me! I'm a borderline computard, in fact our desktop keeps schitzing out and I have to keep taking it in. The repair guys can't figure it out and I'm clueless, and you guys are talking about encryptions and stealing files remotely. That stuff is so far above my head it might as well be the space station.

Thank God I still have this old IBM laptop to play around on. It's probably 10 years old or more, but works fine. My former employer was going to toss it and gave it to me.

Akita1
July 2, 2013, 10:17 PM
Wow, you computer experts amaze me! I'm a borderline computard, in fact our desktop keeps schitzing out and I have to keep taking it in. The repair guys can't figure it out and I'm clueless, and you guys are talking about encryptions and stealing files remotely. That stuff is so far above my head it might as well be the space station.

Thank God I still have this old IBM laptop to play around on. It's probably 10 years old or more, but works fine. My former employer was going to toss it and gave it to me.
You MUST stop clicking on things my brother...

Ignition Override
July 3, 2013, 03:45 AM
rondog:
You are highly skilled compared to "guess who"? You can't be a computard, because everybody else is more skilled.
I nickname my coworkers "Lt. Dan". The guy this week is a retired Air Force ("Bird") Col., hence he was Col. Dan.

Ryanxia
July 3, 2013, 10:56 AM
This is why I roll my eyes at a lot of people who don tin hats about how electronic files are "so easy to hack". They're ONLY easy to hack IF they can be found, IF they can be accessed, and IF they can be decrypted.

;)~
We're talking two sides of the same coin :)
I'm specifically referring to what most individual people on here would do for a list. Mostly being an excel file with maybe an encryption. Of course there are extra steps to make it difficult to breach but most people here probably won't go that far which is why I made the statement that be prepared of the potential of it being copied/taken.

huntsman
July 3, 2013, 11:28 AM
I have had a complete list for years on an Excel spreadsheet. If a gun comes home with me, it's on the list.

yeah me too and because I keep receipts I was able to rebuild my gun buying history back to my first purchase in 1978 ;) I also track ammo so I can tell you what I paid back to 2003

Trent
July 3, 2013, 11:43 AM
For instance, if you think that it's easy to decrypt files that properly use good and time-tested commercially available encryption software, then you've got another think coming.


Correct; it's still impossible to break higher end encryption that's secured by private certificate, if you don't have the private certificate (key).

Password based encryption is as weak as the password, regardless of encryption mechanism. We can break AES256 at my office overnight if the seed is hashed off of a plaintext password (out to a limit; you get over 14 characters or have mixed special symbols it broadens the key space to the point we might not have compute time to do it). Meanwhile, if it is instead secured with a proper 4096+ bit key, we won't even try. I'd be long dead and buried before my servers could break it.


And anybody who thinks security ends there is sadly mistaken...this is another area of vulnerability. Multiple layers of security make access to important files incrementally more difficult because each level of security provides an added level of protection against methods that others are vulnerable to.


Correct again.

E.g. Your home network is only as strong as your WiFI password. Use a common English word, surname, or mix of those with maybe a few numbers, your home network could be breached easily.

Then it comes down to what computer level security you have. Windows XP? We're in, in seconds. Windows 7, properly patched, with a decently strong password? Going to take longer. Don't use a password on your PC? You're screwed.

Use the same password on your computer that you use on a website that sends HTTP login info we'll snatch it out of the air and have full access to not only that website but also your computer, and any other (secure HTTPS) website that you happen to use the same login info for.

Use a different password for ALL websites, and computers. (I have to remember hundreds of them for work, it's a pain, but not impossible).

Don't write the password down and stick it on the bezel of your computer.


For example, secure networks don't just rely on firewalls and electronic security access programs. They're also set up to be independent of other networks, and the stations which access them are also in controlled areas. You cannot hack through a firewall by an independent computer if that computer has no physical access to the network.


We use a similar scheme for our storage networks. They are not accessible from the outside world, separate physical switches, etc.


The same philosophy applies to electronic files. If all you take is the bare minimum, then you're setting yourself up for a single-point failure. Just like hand writing a list and then not securing it physically, for example.


I can't count the number of times we've had to send things to DriveSavers because a customer "thought his laptop was backed up" .. (Magically, I imagine). Most of our customers now have us set up forced replication on any work computers to get a snapshot of mobile devices; but invariably, someone starts to do work related stuff on a personal device we don't have control over and then loses it (drive crashes, coffee spills, whatever). We can generally salvage it, but not always.

Also, your backups are only as good as the media they are written to. Had a customer sadly disappointed one time when they were using an off the shelf MagOp disk based backup (this was 15 years ago), disks were bad, they didn't notice. Same thing with tape backups, etc. Those things have a shelf life. As do burnt DVD's!


I have an older laptop, for example, that I could set up as a stand-alone computer and never connect it to a network. If I really wanted to be secure, I could set it up to boot up and run on an operating system installed on a flash drive. I could create and save any files I want and save them as heavily encrypted files on flash drives or micro-SD cards, which I can then remove and physically secure elsewhere. I can shred existing files/erase hard drive space using a shredding program rated to DOD standards. If I was really concerned, I could also physically destroy the laptop hard drive by a variety of means.


Most mobile phones have enough storage to stash an OS on them and boot off of them now. My phone even has a boot menu - if I plug it in to boot off of it, I can choose any Windows OS (workstation or server), either boot in to, or run setup off of. I've used it to rebuild servers from bare metal before. :)


In the end I would have any data I wanted secured in encrypted flash drives or micro-SD cards which are so small that physically securing them presents any number of possibilities that could frustrate even the most dedicated search for them.


Until you get forgetful and forget where you stashed something that small. :)


This is why I roll my eyes at a lot of people who don tin hats about how electronic files are "so easy to hack". They're ONLY easy to hack IF they can be found, IF they can be accessed, and IF they can be decrypted.


Security through obscurity still works, always has, always will. Is it 100%? No, but what really, truly is? :)

bushmaster1313
July 3, 2013, 07:54 PM
I'm not really worried about NSA but it did made me think about their capability to read e-mails.

E-mails are old hat.

If I ran NSA, my agency would have the capability of reading the files on any computer hooked up to the Internet.

Ignition Override
July 5, 2013, 12:59 AM
Trent:
It seems safer to use a foreign word as password on the company website.
But the general subject of this word would not be hard to figure out, because of the type of business.

irl104
July 5, 2013, 02:42 PM
Thank you for posting the info.

22-rimfire
July 6, 2013, 07:41 AM
Now if I can just get my lazy self in gear to get my OWN completed! It's the photo-taking.....I'm just too anal to use snapshots, I want good quality, detailed photos

That is the hard part. My list is complete. But my photo taking is not. Just never satisfied with the photos.

yeah me too and because I keep receipts I was able to rebuild my gun buying history back to my first purchase in 1978 I also track ammo so I can tell you what I paid back to 2003.

I did that as one of my very first projects when I bought my first computer (except the ammo part as I don't care enough for that). High dollar and collectables are on lists or most of them.

If I ran NSA, my agency would have the capability of reading the files on any computer hooked up to the Internet.

Me too or I would think about such a system. That my friend is the "big one" as far as I'm concerned. You know all those automatic scans that your computer does.... once could vey easily be a government scan that you are not even aware of happening. Download or update virus files.... everyday.... tin foil hat stuff to be sure.

Since the NSA revelations, I have been disconnecting my computer from the internet when it's turned on but idle. If you leave your computer on, many of the scans happen at night and you are not even aware of them happening IF the computer is left on 24/7.

flphotog
July 6, 2013, 07:46 AM
All the guns i've owned in the past 20 years are in an Excel file along with serial numbers, make of scope, date disposed of, etc. i have a photo album of my antique Winchester collection and my more valuable modern guns.
I keep all of my info in a single excel file as well. I see no need for a separate file food each gun.

BigN
July 6, 2013, 07:48 AM
I have a great app for an Iphone 5. It's called "Gun Log." In depth information for your guns, ammo, and reload workups, pretty much everything you need when it comes to guns.

22-rimfire
July 6, 2013, 07:59 AM
Amazing what some of us actually carry with us every single day via cell phones. I have not evolved to that level of information accessibility. It is one of the reasons that I resisted getting a smart phone for years, not to mention the added cost. But a year or ago, I finally took that plunge as well.

Starship1st
July 7, 2013, 10:17 AM
Thank you very much.:cool:

donaoff
July 7, 2013, 09:21 PM
Thanks for the template. Now I'll finally do what I should have done all along:)

K0ZZZ
July 7, 2013, 10:40 PM
When I wrote my Shot Works software, the very first thing was build the security high encryption framework. Then the rest of the software. I even posted the encryption routine on the website so folks can look at it.

C96
July 8, 2013, 08:03 PM
If your firearms are insured, make sure that you have documentation that will satisfy their claims folks. I keep all relevant purchasing information plus photos showing condition in a folder in my safety deposit box.

If things get stolen, the police will want the basic firearms info, the insurance company may want/need a bit more depending upon your insurance coverage.

Been there, done that.

allan

Stevie-Ray
July 10, 2013, 01:57 PM
I've done the same thing years ago. Sorry fellas, I'd have mentioned it then, but I thought pretty much everybody knew about databases and such.:uhoh:

I have copies in different safes and a SDB.

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