Pack It In?


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Potatohead
June 30, 2013, 03:48 PM
Do you guys pack it in and quit when you're obviously "off" at the range?
Or do you stay, and try to hammer it out? Is their anything else that you work on that requires less concentration maybe? This morning i had A sneaky suspicion that I was just slinging lead for the sake of slinging lead. Much different from the few trips before this where i was really zoned in and working. My range is 45 min away so its hard to just pack it in. Its Kind of like visiting one of those casinos out in the sticks, and deciding your not winning and dont want to play cards anymore-nothin much else to do you know? You guys got any tips on easier things to work on or how to zone back in?

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Potatohead
June 30, 2013, 04:53 PM
Oh, none of you guys ever have an "off" day? lol

Walkalong
June 30, 2013, 05:00 PM
I have off days with pistols. I just try to enjoy myself anyway, don't let it frustrate me, and certainly do not take any load testing serious.

Rifles? Not so much an off day, as just a lack of patience to make the shots.

MikeJackmin
June 30, 2013, 05:04 PM
I find it can go either way.

Everybody has weaknesses in their technique, and some days those weaknesses become obvious. On a good day, it's a gift, because you can try different ways to fix the problem, and it's a lot easier to find your way when the problem is easy to see.

Other days, it's just a waste of good lead.

Lex Luthier
June 30, 2013, 05:29 PM
Everyone has their own tolerance to specific situations. We all like to be good at our hobbies. Nothing wrong with taking a break.

Queen_of_Thunder
June 30, 2013, 05:42 PM
There are days when everything is going great and I stop with 1 mag. Then there are days when I start to have trouble and when it happens I pack it in. I don't want to create problems with my shooting so I take time off to settle down. I'm lucky enough to have a range with TV,WiFi,Kitchen,Bar and pro shop so there is always a way to relax at the range if you are not shooting. I'm here now having lunch and using their WiFi.

Reloadron
June 30, 2013, 06:30 PM
The timing is interesting. :)

Tomorrow I plan on going to my outdoor range. I'll drag along several guns.

I have a Colt AR Sporter Target. I want to run some .223 loads through I have worked up. I'll shoot that at 100 yards and chronograph my shots. If things go well and I am shooting well I'll run maybe 100 or so rounds through it. If things aren't going well I'll move on to my .308 bolt gun or my M1A and run some out to 200 yards, likely after 50 rounds.

Between shooting any gun I'll find time to relax and BS with the other shooters. Maybe walk over and shoot some pistol or some .22. I always drag at least one pistol and one old .22 bolt gun along.

When things don't go well I just move to something else to shoot or the BS mode. The range is a good hours ride so when I do the outdoor range it is a day as in at least an 8 hour day. I just drag enough stuff to keep myself amused. I never "pack it in". :)

Up here in NE Ohio I cherish the time I can shoot outdoors as freezing my butt off isn't my idea of fun. Not as young as I once was. Also, finally retired this will be my "Summer Of The Range".

Ron

JohnBiltz
June 30, 2013, 07:39 PM
I have bad eyes days and days where I would do better throwing rocks. The bad eyes days I switch to just using lasers. The better off just throwing rocks days I quit. Better to not practice than to practice bad habits.

Scuba_Steve
June 30, 2013, 07:46 PM
I try to get to the range twice a week. If I find I am having an off day I will definately pack it in early.

Sam1911
June 30, 2013, 07:55 PM
The question has a couple of answers. Having an "off" day when you're practicing is just an opportunity to analyze WHAT's got you screwed up. Sit down and figure out what is throwing off your best work. Run drills to practice the fundamentals until you've isolated and beaten the problem.

Of course that comes with experience. You have to be aware enough to understand what you're doing and what causes various kinds of problems. "Oh, it's just an off day," simply means you aren't aware enough to see what your mistakes are. Get some help, ask for some advice, and solve your problem.

Then there's match day. In competition, having an "Off" day is all in your head. You can goof up and feel yourself fall behind. You can goof up and come out ok. You can nail the fundamentals and still get tagged by dumb bad luck. Or you can simply be outclassed by a competitive rival who's been practicing a little more than you. Your response to all of those situations is the one thing you control completely. Focus, clear your head, and persevere. If you pack it in and give up, you've beaten YOURSELF.

And in the end, YOU are the only one who can defeat you.

CapnMac
June 30, 2013, 08:46 PM
I've done just that--pack it in. Probably been the better for it.
I've also not done so and been the worse for it.

If I know my training time is limited, I'm much more apt to dog it out and train "through" it.

But, as with much involving shooting, it's the mental state you have to cultivate, not the results on the paper. After all, the "real" world will not call a time out for rain, excessive heat, blistering cold, or the like.

The harder thing, I have found, is to not per-emptively call off a trip to the range because the weather is awful (been over 100 here in north Texas of late, miserable conditions that make a miserable day at the range worse). But, mindset is the first key part of toolset, so, one dogs on.

bozzman3
June 30, 2013, 08:55 PM
I have to be having fun.I will stay if shooting poorly.I will even leave early even if shooting well and not having fun.Mood,weather,firearms and other club members all have factors in the day of shooting

sixgunner455
June 30, 2013, 09:03 PM
I am more likely to leave the range over behavior of others when I am not on the line than over my performance on the line. You have to get in the "zone". That fly doesn't bother me. The bead of sweat running down my nose doesn't bother me. The vapor collecting in my shooting glasses - don't think about it, just wipe it off and get back on the scope so I can focus.

If I am not hitting anything, I may step back, drink something, eat something, go to the restroom, etc, but I'm not leaving over it. I'm getting back behind my rifle, or putting up a fresh silhouette for my pistol, and trying again.

beatledog7
June 30, 2013, 09:14 PM
I've had bad shooting days, but generally I have a plan and stick with that plan unless I feel that I'm so off that my ability to concentrate may be the problem. Then it's time to "pack it in."

Potatohead
June 30, 2013, 09:20 PM
wow. thanks for the posts fellas. another thing, i think i went through more ammo today than i ever have. just slinging down range hoping i'd hit the bullseye i guess. very disappointing since i did so well last time especially, i was hoping for more. one thing though, i think i got cocky-i barely did any dry firing this week, unlike last week when i had a pretty good outing. i think that had a lot to do with it

Phaedrus/69
July 1, 2013, 01:53 AM
If I'm having an "off day" I usually switch for my .22 pistol. First I'll just blaze away a bit, then I'll really slow down and work on fundamentals. I'll think, "Even if it takes me 5 minutes, I'm putting five rounds in the orange center of the target." Usually this means shooting slowly, apply one pound of pressure the trigger, then one more, then one more- until the shot breaks. I'll kind mentally chant, Front sight! Front sight! Front sight!

Once I get it dialed in again I try to put another mag or two through my 9mm or .45ACP just to make sure I leave the range on a "good note."

Of course, if I'm really just not "feeling it" I'll leave instead of wasting ammo.

stompah
July 1, 2013, 02:09 AM
I usually have 4 types of bad range days:

Back pain - usually start off well then deteriorate. If I didn't have a few advil before I hit the range I pack it up.

Caffiene shakes - I natural have a slight shake in my hands. Couple that with a couple of Red Bulls or coffee & my groups start opening up. Depending on how bad they are dictates if I stay or not.

A true bad day - sometimes I just need to step back and examine what I am doing, correct the problems and then step up to the line again. I never leave early for a day like that.

Uncomfortable with my neighbors - some days at the range I am there for 4 hours and nothing sketchy happens. Sometimes 2 or 3 mags in and I leave for fear of my safety.

ljnowell
July 1, 2013, 03:16 AM
No, I dont. I shoot competitively and my range trips are 75% "work" and 25% fun. I push myself through it when I am off, just like I do in competition. When I complete the number of rounds I set out to shoot, then I just start plinking for fun and I could care less if I'm off my game then

230RN
July 1, 2013, 03:50 AM
I haven't shot competition for many decades, so when I hit the range, it's basically for fun and SD practice. If I'm "off,"I just switch guns for a while and/or maybe go outside for a smoke.

Sometimes that works.

Sometimes it doesn't.

When I was competing, though, I'd only have a little coffee in the AM just to get the innards pumping enough to evacuate. If I was having a bad day on the line, I'd stop for a while within the time constraints and try to imagine that I was just back at home, plinking on my own range out in the west pasture.

Sometimes that worked.

Sometimes it didn't.

In both cases, it was a question of relaxing and not caring about that last #&$%$ flyer even though I called it.

Terry

b.thomas
July 1, 2013, 08:54 AM
I'm 68, retired and at this stage in of my life burning some gunpowder is just pure joy. I'm not trying to empress somebody of how good I am, I'm just out there to have fun.................good day, bad day.............it don't matter.
If I'm having a bad time hitting the target............who cares! I'm out shooting just for the fun of it and as long as I can put some lead down range?
Well...................what else matters?:D

Deltaboy
July 1, 2013, 09:04 AM
I had a few but 90% of my bad days are due to other shooters not being THR.

Sav .250
July 1, 2013, 09:11 AM
Every day isn`t perfect. That`s the test.

larryh1108
July 1, 2013, 09:19 AM
I bring more than 1 handgun.
If I struggle with one, I pick up another.
Some are easier to shoot than others due to size or caliber.
I always warm up with 100 .22LR. I can usually tell if I am dialed in
after that.
I always end up the session with my 1911.
That usually takes away any "bad" sessions.

Ending with a 1911 gives you a good taste.
To me, they are the "easiest" to shoot and are very satisfying.

OH_Spartan
July 1, 2013, 09:20 AM
The only time a bad day bothers me is if I am trying a new load and I can't tell if the errant shots are from a load my gun doesn't like or just me.

ZeSpectre
July 1, 2013, 09:21 AM
it is rare, but there have been times when I've "packed it in" rather than ingrain some bad habits. Mostly I try to figure out what is going wrong and correct it but every now and then I seem to have one of those days where I couldn't hit a barn from the inside.

OilyPablo
July 1, 2013, 10:13 AM
I know what you mean. I am/was a self taught handgun shooter and I used to have a day when I could hardly hit paper and was very, very frustrated - sometimes I would pack it in, other times I would switch guns. Then one cold winter day indoors, my best shooting buddy and I had the whole range to ourselves. A range employee who seemed bored at first wandered into the bay and just watched us for a bit - then spontaneously struck up a very friendly conversation and said he likes it when THR/safe type guys use the range. He said we were shooting pretty well, but noticed a few things..........well here we go MAN EGO, PROUD EGO DEFENSES ON RED ALERT - RANGE GUY GIVING UNSOLICITED ADVICE - WARNING, WARNING, RED ALERT!! ALL PRIDE WALLS UP.

But it was not like that at all. He noticed very subtle things. No radical change in grip, posture, stance - he actually was so observant and had a keen knowledge to give advice based on the good that was already there and building on that. My buddy and I were shooting groups with all holes touching - and some holes in the same spot. I have not had a pack it in session since that one encounter. Strangely I have not seen that guy since that day, but if I have even a slightly off day, I think back to the three points specifically for my style.

I guess my point is, use such "off" days to learn.

aarondhgraham
July 1, 2013, 10:46 AM
Way back in the dark ages,,,
Before compound bows got popular.
I was an aspiring (hopeful) competition archer.

My coach always expounded the theory,,,
"Never practice doing anything badly."

His reasoning was to shoot an end of six arrows,,,
If they hit reasonably well and felt good,,,
Then practice that day to cement it.

If that first six arrows were wild and scattered,,,
Perhaps you shouldn't practice that day,,,
As you would cement bad technique.

He got this from the writings of some ancient Japanese archer.

I hold somewhat to that theory,,,
If my first couple of cylinders are good shots,,,
I then seriously practice that to cement the good muscle memory.

If they are not patterned but are all over the paper,,,
I will continue to shoot but focus on larger reactive targets,,,
After all, I am out there to have fun and there's no fun in not shooting.

Aarond

.

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 02:08 PM
If you pack it in and give up, you've beaten YOURSELF.

And in the end, YOU are the only one who can defeat you.

Man, Im pumped now!!! I can hear "Eye of the Tiger in the background:)

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 02:12 PM
I'm 68, retired and at this stage in of my life burning some gunpowder is just pure joy. I'm not trying to empress somebody of how good I am, I'm just out there to have fun.................good day, bad day.............it don't matter.
If I'm having a bad time hitting the target............who cares! I'm out shooting just for the fun of it and as long as I can put some lead down range?
Well...................what else matters?:D
this made me smile..

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 02:14 PM
thx Oily..maybe he is your guardian range angel..

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 02:15 PM
Way back in the dark ages,,,
Before compound bows got popular.
I was an aspiring (hopeful) competition archer.

My coach always expounded the theory,,,
"Never practice doing anything badly."

His reasoning was to shoot an end of six arrows,,,
If they hit reasonably well and felt good,,,
Then practice that day to cement it.

If that first six arrows were wild and scattered,,,
Perhaps you shouldn't practice that day,,,
As you would cement bad technique.

He got this from the writings of some ancient Japanese archer.

I hold somewhat to that theory,,,
If my first couple of cylinders are good shots,,,
I then seriously practice that to cement the good muscle memory.

If they are not patterned but are all over the paper,,,
I will continue to shoot but focus on larger reactive targets,,,
After all, I am out there to have fun and there's no fun in not shooting.

Aarond

.
i like this idea

x_wrench
July 1, 2013, 02:29 PM
i seldom have an off day, at least one that i can not work my way thru. sometimes it takes a while to get into the groove, but i can usually get there. on the days that either i can not, or just find myself not enjoying it (yes, that can happen too), i first try shooting something entirely different, than i had planned on "working on". i always take at least 3 rifles, and 2 pistols, not including a 22lr or 2. i have also packed the stuff up, put it in the truck, and did some work to improve the range. that can break the mood, and change the day sometimes. and if it does not, at least the trip was not a total waste. once in a while, i must confess, i do just pack it in, and chalk it up to a bad day. sometimes, it just is not going to work out. and with the way things are, trying to even find reloading components, i am not willing to totally waste ammo.

md2lgyk
July 1, 2013, 02:37 PM
I'm 68, retired and at this stage in of my life burning some gunpowder is just pure joy.

Same here, though I'm "only" 65. For 25 years, I was a serious bullseye pistol competitor (earned my Expert card 20-some years ago). Never could quite make Master. Now I figure at my age I've already been as good as I'll ever be, so I just shoot matches for fun. Like doing the .22 and centerfire stages with revolvers.

*NOVA*
July 1, 2013, 02:50 PM
Like many other posters here, I have to drive at least 45 minutes to get to a decent outdoor range. Its typical for me to spend a couple of hours the night before just getting ready for the trip. Brought my son with me one time and we started with long range on a bolt action I recently acquired - kid was bored to tears. So we switched to pistols and shot water jugs on the short range - that saved the day!

Pack it in? I can imagine when your shots are not making any sense or some similar problem you might want to cut your losses, save your ammo and leave. But on the way home you might think, 'Well, I could have tried this or that." Most of us with any experience at all I think realize that there are so many variables affecting our accuracy you can change one thing and get totally different results. To me, its worth the time to stop, take a break, watch some other shooters for a few minutes, clear my head and then go back and try something slightly different. Even a bad day can be a learning experience if we can remember what we did and later, try to analyze the cause and effects.

scaatylobo
July 1, 2013, 02:58 PM
Shooting is a martial art and as such I don't allow myself to leave on a bad note.

Since I perceive the art of shooting as one that can save my bacon on any given day ,I don't stop till I ironed out whatever is bothering me.

Might take a coffee break and then a water break and a toilet break after all that.

But its worth the time and energy and I NEED to trust my skills and know they are 'ON' at all times.

Erik M
July 1, 2013, 03:09 PM
I head out with a full tool kit and first aid kit, when I plan an outing there isnt much that is going to rain on my parade.

holdencm9
July 1, 2013, 04:11 PM
Some days the groups are a little tighter than others. Some days I will see my target and think, "I did that?!?" in both a good and bad way. I can surprise myself sometimes and other times I will squeeze the trigger and be way off my POI and can't figure it out. But I have never just stopped shooting because I was shooting poorly. Usually because it is such an investment of time to shoot (hour drive to outdoor range, 20 minute drive plus a likely wait for indoor range, plus all the time before and after the range, at home getting ready or cleaning the guns).

Regardless of how well or how poorly I shoot, I usually go home feeling better about life than I did beforehand. It's like my zen.

stumpers
July 1, 2013, 04:18 PM
If I'm having an off day, I'll go right up to the target and make sure my rounds are going where I want them.

If at 10 yards, I'm trying to do things right and I'm still sucking...I'll get to 1 or 2 yards and do everything I would normally do and work my way back.

So, I won't pack it in, but I won't stand at the 15 or 20 and throw rounds all over.

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 04:52 PM
THIS ^^^^^^^^^^^ will be my new Modus Operandi when im "off". Very good idea, seems simple enough, dont know why i didnt think of that. I definitely stood at the 15 or 20 and "threw rounds all over" yesterday (about 3 times more than usual). Thanks for the post...

RetiredUSNChief
July 1, 2013, 04:55 PM
An "off day"? Sure. Had lots of them. But having an "off day" in and of itself isn't enough to make me pack it in for the day.

An off day can simply be another interesting challenge to work thorough...and that can be both fun and a learning experience.

However, if the shooting stops being fun...then I'll pack it in. To me, there's no sense in turning a shooting hobby that I love into something that I don't like. If it gets to the point where the frustration, irritation, or general blues sap all the fun out of being at the range, then it's time for me to quit and come back later.

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 05:45 PM
well said.

gym
July 1, 2013, 05:45 PM
If you are having a bad day, as mentioned, your head is not there. You are preoccupied with something else. You must center yourself with your breathing and go back to basics, "as with anything". It must come back at that point. Once it returns you may resume what you were doing before you had the problem.

Teachu2
July 1, 2013, 05:48 PM
I try to keep a modded Ruger 22/45 in the bag every trip. If a "bad day" starts, I get it out and get back to basics - sight picture, breathing, trigger. Usually refocuses me quickly.

Reloadron
July 1, 2013, 07:05 PM
I'm 68, retired and at this stage in of my life burning some gunpowder is just pure joy. I'm not trying to empress somebody of how good I am, I'm just out there to have fun.................good day, bad day.............it don't matter.
If I'm having a bad time hitting the target............who cares! I'm out shooting just for the fun of it and as long as I can put some lead down range?
Well...................what else matters?:D
Pretty much a ditto on that but I am 63 and this is my first summer retired. I am out there for pure leisure and enjoyment.

Today was funny. I dragged my Colt Sporter Target AR. The rifle has a 1:7 twist and have no clue why but I was thinking 1:9. Unfortunately I dragged 55 grain ammunition along. The Federal stuff shot all over a target at 50 yards, I just couldn't group. I also had some of my hand loads I loaded in March of '99. They were 55 grain Nosler ballistic tip boat tails. I graduated to keyholes. :) I finally read the barrel clearly marked 1:7. On the bright side not a single piece of brass went unrecoverable. Called it a day with the AR and had a ball with my old Remington 512.

What matters was I had fun and really enjoyed the day. I'll sleep well later tonight.

Ron

SlowFuse
July 1, 2013, 07:27 PM
Just this past Saturday I had an "off day" so to speak. I was getting patterns at 25 instead of my normal groups, with a proven pistol load...

So I packed it in, sort of. I took the pistols and couple hundred rounds I planned to shoot back to the truck and got a bottle of water. Alabama heat gets to you this time of year. Then got out my front loader and slung some lead balls at 100. I still had an enjoyable day granted it was at a much slower pace than anticipated. But I didn't blow through the rounds that I worked hard preparing a couple days before. So I guess for me ill be sure to always have a backup plan, especially if you have a long drive to the range you visit.

tightgroup tiger
July 1, 2013, 07:55 PM
I never pack it in unless I am having a bad stress day and am knowing that I am just wasting ammo. That doesn't happen very often but it does happen and when it does I leave the lane and go BS with the guys at the counter of the indoor range.
I do this to cool down so I don't take my frustrations home with me.

Anyone who has shot a lot over their life knows what I'm talking about, including the range officers, so theirs no penalty in talking to them or any other seasoned shooter about it. It only relieves the stress of the problem. We have all been there.

When you can find that you can admit your having a bad day to someone else, you will be able to admit it to your self and then start analyzing what is causing it. Don't beat yourself up over it, dump the stress from it and look forward to the next range day you will have.
There are days I walk into the range and know I shouldn't even be here because I had a really hard or bad day at work. That's when I shoot for the pure enjoyment of shooting. I know I'm not a "TERMINATOR", I'm human and subject to emotion and it will always affect my shooting if I'm not having fun. When I get too serious about being human, I totally change the reason I'm there and start having fun, ( break out a small snub and try to shoot 25yd bullseyes with it so I can laugh at myself).

The point is that we all have days we aren't proud of, just don't leave the range on a bad note, and always look forward to the next trip and think it will be sweet, because it will be, but don't keep making the same mistakes over and over again. That helps nothing.

Treat it like the fishermans moto':
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day in the office".

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 08:43 PM
On the bright side not a single piece of brass went unrecoverable

this is always nice im sure..i wouldnt know, its something that i havent encountered yet!

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 08:45 PM
Alabama heat gets to you this time of year

no doubt about that. it can take a toll on you

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 08:46 PM
well said tightgroup T

Torian
July 1, 2013, 08:52 PM
Eye fatigue can set in pretty quick for me (left eye dominant, shoot right handed). Once my shooting starts to suffer, I usually sit back, light up a stogie, and shoot the breeze a bit.

Once I'm relaxed, I'll usually resume shooting.

jakk280rem
July 1, 2013, 09:29 PM
Oh yeah. I have off days. Usually I'll get fatigued if I sit behind the scope too long. Eyes and neck start to go leading to a tension headache. I used to try to metan up and power on. I realized it's just a waste of ammo to do so. I usually change disciplines. I get up and do dome move and shoot exercises or something if I get off. Usually if I just do something different I can come back and give it another go and get better results than trying to power through.

gspn
July 1, 2013, 09:34 PM
Having an "off day" is the perfect time to not quit! There is no better time to practice than when you have to fight through something to focus and get good hits.

The only place I quit when I'm "off" is on the reloading bench. If I make a mistake I correct it and refocus...if I make a second mistake I quit and come back the next day.

hemiram
July 7, 2013, 02:50 AM
Last time I went shooting, I gave up after a short time, because I was just beyond bad and I couldn't see wasting ammo by continuing. I was very shaky that morning, and I have no idea why. I picked up my S&W 4006TSW with a laser on it, and I was all over the place. The next morning, I was rock solid. I have no idea what was going on. It's happened a few times over the last 10 years or so, and always seems to be in the morning, a time of day I hate as I'm a total night owl.

rduchateau2954
July 7, 2013, 04:56 AM
I take my frustration out on steel plates with .22s when I have a bad day. No way to tell what kind of groups I'm getting, just satisfying "ping" after satisfying "ping"

xfyrfiter
July 7, 2013, 04:53 PM
On good days when the pain is low, I find that I can ride my bike or shoot my guns equally well . Bad days though it,s anybodys guess where the rounds will strike or if I can ride 35 miles or 3.5.

RBid
July 7, 2013, 09:27 PM
When I'm having an off run, I correct it. When I hit a rough string, I slow down, and focus intently on fundamentals. I don't walk away.

mstreddy
July 8, 2013, 05:32 PM
Generally an off day is a time to refocus on the basics. If that doesn't tune me back in, then it's time to take a breather. See what other people are doing, bs, take a drink, etc... And then get back in the zone.
One really bad day wasn't the shooting, but was mechanical issues with nearly everything I brought out that day. 1st - the 2 new surplus Thompson mags would not lock into place in the receiver. Had to either hold mag up in place or set bottom of mag into bench. 2 - the batch of 45 ACP LSWC I had loaded last year and neglected to plunk-test did not plunk into the Storm lake barrel on the Kimber. Had to push the gun into battery for every shot. After 20 or so I got fed up and put it up. Had not brought any more factory ammo. And -- 3 that was the day the Walther P22 decided to crack the slide in 3 places. So, that was the day I just packed everything up and said -- time to go home. I didn't even pull out the G17 cause I was thinking what else can go wrong today?
As others, when one gun has issues I just change to another one. But that was not a good day at all.

*NOVA*
July 8, 2013, 06:33 PM
...1st - the 2 new surplus Thompson mags would not lock into place in the receiver. Had to either hold mag up in place or set bottom of mag into bench. 2 - the batch of 45 ACP LSWC I had loaded last year and neglected to plunk-test did not plunk into the Storm lake barrel on the Kimber. Had to push the gun into battery for every shot. After 20 or so I got fed up and put it up. Had not brought any more factory ammo. And -- 3 that was the day the Walther P22 decided to crack the slide in 3 places...that was not a good day at all.

:rolleyes:Can we nominate this as the UNDERSTATEMENT OF THE YEAR?
Holy Moses! mstreddy, I bet my next paycheck you won't let anything like number 1 or 2 happen again. Number 3 you could not predict would happen, that was just terrible luck!

Not wanting to steal this thread - I needed to express some sympathy for this poster and hope I never have a day that bad. But for anyone not knowing what a plunk test is (I've only been into guns for a few years and still learning) - here it is:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdJLNox1hpk

clutch
July 8, 2013, 06:41 PM
If I feel distracted, not really paying attention, I leave. I want and need to be safe, even if it is only me out there.

Mat, not doormat
July 9, 2013, 01:29 AM
Why practice shooting badly? To shoot well, you have to practice shooting well. Go home and mow the lawn, or do something else. When you're shooting well, shoot a lot. When you're not, go do something more productive.

Hunter125
July 9, 2013, 01:41 AM
I usually either start shooting larger targets or switch to .22 so I can still have fun and not care about how much ammo I'm wasting.

Zach S
July 10, 2013, 04:21 AM
Depends on what I'm shooting, how I'm feeling, how crowded (loud) the range is, or a combination of the three.

Normally, I pack it in.

TRX
July 11, 2013, 08:02 PM
As long as the gun goes "BOOM!" when I pull the trigger, I'm happy. Hitting the target is nice, but the boom and recoil are the fun part.

I can empathize with the "serious shooter" types, but I shoot for fun, and I'm easily pleased...

History.Doc
July 11, 2013, 08:16 PM
Well, I had a pretty terrible day yesterday and I just kept right on shooting. I think I should have packed it in though.

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