Done with Progressive reloading


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gsc3zny
June 30, 2013, 07:18 PM
Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive? I bought a Lee Pro 1000 with all the goodies-bullet feeder, multi tube assemblies, shellplates, etc but just could never get it to work right. I bought a single stage Lee press and really enjoy it. Yes, I cannot produce hundreds of rounds in an hour, but it is more relaxing producing 50 or so than it is having to stop every few minutes to make some adjustment on the progressive.

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eam3clm@att.net
June 30, 2013, 07:21 PM
Not all progressive press are made equal. I hate to knock Lee products, but almost all the products that I have, and have had, required a little tinkering.

Sam1911
June 30, 2013, 07:32 PM
I'm sure people do sometimes, as their needs and interests change, or (like yours) if they never developed beyond a certain point.

A progressive reloader is a must-have tool for someone in many competitive disciplines and/or someone practicing/training at a certain level. If you are only shooting a few boxes of ammo a month, a single-stage may be all you ever need.

gahunter12
June 30, 2013, 07:44 PM
I'm sorry you haven't had good luck with your progressive press. I can't blame you for droping back to a single stage. As said above not all progressives are created equal. I load on two Dillon RL550b's without hitch. I have only had 1 hicup in the last 90,000 rounds loaded on my 550b's, and that was my fault when I tried polishing the SPP bar. I do load 7mm, and .300wm on a single stage, but I don't think I could ever go from a 550b to a single stage for pistol, and .223.

3GunEric
June 30, 2013, 08:00 PM
I can not RAVE enough about my Dillon 550b! Any problems have been me and not the machine.

I would say that your problem is specifically with Lee and not all progressive reloading machines.

RealGun
June 30, 2013, 08:02 PM
I had success going from single stage first, then to turret, and then to the Pro1000. Unless doing precision rifle, there is no way I would have settled for the slow production of the single stage. But it works for you, and that's what matters.

The Pro1000 is a tinkerers machine, requiring talent and patience, as well as the ability to derive some satisfaction in getting it running smoothly, which is possible and common.

HexHead
June 30, 2013, 08:02 PM
Your opinion would be different if you used a Dillon instead of that piece of junk.

arizona98tj
June 30, 2013, 08:04 PM
Don't let the Lee progressive leave a bad taste in your mouth regarding the concept of progressive loading.

After 30+ years of single stage press use, I bought a Dillon 650 with most of the bells and whistles and couldn't be happier....and now, multiple caliber conversions later, I still am completely satisfied with its performance.

jmorris
June 30, 2013, 08:11 PM
I have more progressives than anything else but still use turrets and single stage presses that I use from time to time.

If Lee was the only company that made progressive presses I would use them a lot more.

That's why most folks that have owned them tell the new guys to buy better equipment, the first time around and avoid the frustration.

kudu
June 30, 2013, 08:16 PM
Many years ago I had a Lee Pro 1000, I think that was the model, it had 3 hole turrents, I'd get going good and after a few dozen fine rounds I would have to start adjusting. I probably never had a run of more than 150 before I had to adjust. I put up with that for several years until I ran a friends Dillon 550. I've had my own 550 for better than 20 years now with an occasional problem every few thousand rounds and an occasional adjustment after switching calibers.

I still run most rifle shells on a single stage, I have a Rock Chucker and a Lee O-frame that I use for precision rounds.

243winxb
June 30, 2013, 08:16 PM
The Dillon BL 550 Basic Loader looks like my old RL450, almost. Perfect for reloading a little faster than a single stage.

allaroundhunter
June 30, 2013, 08:18 PM
I wouldn't ditch all progressive presses because a Lee didn't work right. Lee is not even in the same league as a Dillon, and that is for a reason.

jstein650
June 30, 2013, 08:24 PM
I've not had any Lee progressives, but use a lot of their other little tools, gadgets and dies, and think they offer a lot of nice stuff for the money. My progressive Dillon SDB works great once it's set up, but you still have to be REALLY diligent. But I know where the OP is coming from. My MEC 12ga is a semi progressive - you still have to turn the plate, and I've come to just load one at a time on it, which is still pretty fast - just too much can go wrong when the thing is loaded up with a shell at every station. I've dropped enough powder and shot at the wrong time! :(

oneounceload
June 30, 2013, 08:29 PM
If you get better made equipment from other makers, you might have a change of heart. I have had several Lee products over the last 3 decades. They have all been replaced by better stuff from other companies, red, blue and green

bds
June 30, 2013, 08:33 PM
Totally new to reloading, a lot more work than I thought it would be ... Is it like this for eveyone?
Starting out and learning to reload on any progressive has a steeper learning curve than single stage reloading not easily mastered by everyone - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=8965013#post8965013


Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive?
When I had difficulty using my Pro 1000 in progressive mode at first, my reloading mentor had me use it in turret mode by loading only one round at a time. Once I became proficient, he had me go back to progressive mode. Some have posted once they became proficient with single stage reloading, coming back to progressive made it easier.

I bought a single stage Lee press and really enjoy it.
Glad to hear. The ultimate reward of reloading is enjoy shooting our reloads.

BullfrogKen
June 30, 2013, 08:57 PM
I'm a fan of most everything Lee's put out, and I really like the Classic Cast single stage.


But when it comes to their progressives . . . not so much.

Don't let it swear you off from one. If you get a good quality progressive, once you get it set up and working it really works.

RealGun
June 30, 2013, 09:02 PM
Not to ignore that a totally different budget for equipment would be necessary in order to use the highly touted machines. It's much more than a choice of brands for the sake of design and supposed quality.

stubbicatt
June 30, 2013, 09:02 PM
OP. Some of what the others say about the Lee Pro1000 has merit. That press is an inexpensive setup that has a spotty reputation. I also stepped down from progressive reloading to a turret or a single stage press. At the time the move was precipitated more by the immediate need of funds, and to a lesser extent once I had loaded up all that ammo, I just didn't use the press anymore. So I sold my Super 1050 Dillon press, which was a magnificent tool.

Now I use the Lee Classic Cast Turret and a RCBS single stage press. They fit my present needs better, and I am content.

bds
June 30, 2013, 09:06 PM
With all due respect, to all the posters whose solution to ANY Lee progressive problem is simply just another color progressive press, consider this.

OP is a new reloader and I have been working with the OP since OP's first post on THR (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=8964848#post8964848). As we usually recommend for a new reloader, it would have been better if the OP had started out reloading on a single stage press but the OP came to THR already with a Pro 1000 asking for assistance.

Would the situation been different had the OP started out on a different progressive press? Perhaps. But when the OP already purchased a Pro 1000, simply posting that brand XYZ press is the solution won't help the OP's situation.


For this thread, the OP already decided to purchase a single stage press and simply posted if anyone else has gone from progressive to single stage.
Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive?

I do hope the OP continues enjoying this wonderful hobby of reloading and increase the reloading knowledge and proficiency regardless of the color of equipment used.

OK, please resume Lee bashing. :D

BullfrogKen
June 30, 2013, 09:36 PM
No Lee bashing here, but a Pro 1000 is about the worst tool for a new loader to learn on, especially at home by himself.


Enjoy that single stage! You'll use it even if you get a good progressive.

bds
June 30, 2013, 09:43 PM
Pro 1000 is about the worst tool for a new loader to learn on, especially at home by himself.
Yes, no arguing there. It is definitely not for everyone - I think it should have some sort of a warning label on the box ... :D

Beentown
June 30, 2013, 09:44 PM
I myself would sell the Pro and buy a Classic Turret Press. I am now getting just over 200 rounds an hour with mine if I try. Most times it is around 175ish. Loading .380, 9mm, .223 and .308 on it. Nary the problem.

gsc3zny
June 30, 2013, 09:46 PM
Thanks BDS. On another forum I participate in I was accused of bashing Lee products, not in this one. BTW, thanks for your advice, a lot of what you posted to help me was the problem. My point I just couldn't get the thing to work like it was supposed to. It was not worth the frustration of going to garage and constantly have primer issues, crushing the case, one thing after another.

3GunEric
June 30, 2013, 09:46 PM
To bds,

I take your point - did not know he was new to reloading and receiving your help. I think that after re-reading the OP I would rephrase my statement to something like this;

"Rather than move to a single stage press - which for most of us is too slow and time consuming - I would get your current set-up to work to your satisfaction. Seek help from someone familiar with your Lee reloader, if that doesn't work contact Lee with your concerns."

Have you scanned through the many videos online?

http://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?p=Lee+Pro+1000+video

BYJO4
June 30, 2013, 09:48 PM
To me, the use of a single stage or progressive depends on the volume of shooting that one does and the amount of time he has to devote to reloading. Reloading itself is a great hobby and I've been doing it for more than 40 years. For rifle, I do use a single stage since I normally only shoot 60 to 100 rounds every month or so. However, I would not give up my progressive for handgun calibers as I shoot 300 to 500 rounds weekly and don't want to spend the time necesary to reload them on a single stage. I will not bash any make of equipment that one wants to buy and use as we all have our own preferences. However, there will always be differences in quality, ease of operation, and varying amounts of adjustments/maintenance needed to keep things working between the various brands available.

gsc3zny
June 30, 2013, 09:49 PM
I am selling it, and all the accessories not in this forum, however. I am in no hurry to mass produce ammo. Just want to size 50 one night, prime the next, load and crimp the next. BTW, for just handgun ammo, is it really necessary to have a factory crimp die?

RealGun
June 30, 2013, 09:53 PM
I myself would sell the Pro and buy a Classic Turret Press. I am now getting just over 200 rounds an hour with mine if I try. Most times it is around 175ish. Loading .380, 9mm, .223 and .308 on it. Nary the problem.

I prefer the smaller 9 mm on the Pro1000, dedicated to that caliber. The bigger cases and bullets of larger calibers like 40 and 45 and most revolver stuff are easier to manipulate on the turret. I have the Pro1000 setup so I don't have to handle a case or a bullet until reloading the tubes of the feeders. It can be done either way, but personally I would say a turret is a disadvantage for 9mm (or smaller).

35 Whelen
June 30, 2013, 10:10 PM
Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive? I bought a Lee Pro 1000 with all the goodies-bullet feeder, multi tube assemblies, shellplates, etc but just could never get it to work right. I bought a single stage Lee press and really enjoy it. Yes, I cannot produce hundreds of rounds in an hour, but it is more relaxing producing 50 or so than it is having to stop every few minutes to make some adjustment on the progressive.

Conversation I've heard many times:

"I have a Lee progressive loader for sale if you know anybody that's interested."

"Oh? Why are you selling it?"

"I bought a Dillon."

You. Get. What. You. Pay. For.

35W

rajbcpa
June 30, 2013, 10:42 PM
My first progressive press was a Hornady LNL. It sucked. I could not get it to run after 5 months of total frustration I bought a Dillon 550B. It runs flawlessly.

Buy the best - Dillon - and never look back!

raddiver
June 30, 2013, 10:50 PM
But on the flip side of that coin, BDS did do a wonderful set of write ups to work the kinks out of a those lee progressives. Im not a lee user, so i dont know if its the same press. But i do know it was pretty in depth and full of seemingly useful information.


Which leads me to my next thought, why was i looking at that Lee thread since i don't own one. *shrugs* That i will never know.

Sam1911
June 30, 2013, 10:51 PM
I am selling it, and all the accessories not in this forum, however. I am in no hurry to mass produce ammo. Just want to size 50 one night, prime the next, load and crimp the next. BTW, for just handgun ammo, is it really necessary to have a factory crimp die?

Hey folks, there you have it. He wants to make 50 rounds a week. He really doesn't need a progressive or even a turret for that. If he's satisfied with that rate, there's really no reason at all to put the money and effort into a higher-production machine.

bigfinger76
June 30, 2013, 10:56 PM
I am selling it, and all the accessories not in this forum, however. I am in no hurry to mass produce ammo. Just want to size 50 one night, prime the next, load and crimp the next. BTW, for just handgun ammo, is it really necessary to have a factory crimp die?

The FCD is not necessary, assuming you have another crimp die.

jmorris
June 30, 2013, 11:10 PM
I have a bunch of Lee stuff I like, even use the FCD on most of my Dillons. It's not a "hate Lee" attitude so much, just a dislike of things that don't work.

If your blood pressure will stand it try and get a Lee bullet feeder to work for a few thousand rounds...

Farnorthdan
June 30, 2013, 11:12 PM
I never moved up to a progressive, been reloading for about 10 years now, no problems producing the volume to shoot as much as I want, I like a single because its relaxing for me and I personally prefer to be more involved with each round and feel its much safer this way.

Elkins45
June 30, 2013, 11:47 PM
There are usually two major complaints with the Pro 1000: priming and the auto index. If you can't solve them there's still another option. You can sorta, kinda convert your Lee to a Dillon 550 lite by converting it to manual indexing.

Pull out the indexing rod, remove the priming post and take off the case feed apparatus. Now its a manual progressive without a priming station.

To use it you start by manually feeding a case and sizing it. Lower the ram, pull the case and use your hand priming tool to prime it. Reinsert the case and manually index it to the next station, then add a new case in position 1. Yes, it's now slower than a true progressive but it's still significantly faster than doing it all single stage. And the frustration level is dramatically lower.

parker51
July 1, 2013, 12:11 AM
I started with a RCBS Rock Chucker and several years later purchasd a Dillon 550b. I found I still prefer the RCBS over the Dillon for rifle. This is mainly due to the volume of rifle reloads being much less than pistol. Until last week my Dillon had sat unused for about 15 years because I prefer shooting rifle over pistol when I get time at the range. I am now retired so I can spend time at both ranges. I tried to reload 223 on the Dillon but had problems with the powder drop and getting the brass to stand up straight in the sizing station. Since setting the Dillon up last week I have cranked out over 1,000 different pistol rounds and shot about half of them.

bds
July 1, 2013, 12:12 AM
Elkins45, I sorta did that when I started match shooting. Out of OCD, I first only installed the resizing/decapping die in station #1 and resized/decapped all the cases. I then chamber tested all the cases in the match barrels to sort out any over-bulged cases (this was pre-bulge kit days) and cleaned the primer pockets. I then hand primed all the cases.

Then I reloaded in progressive mode with the resizing/decapping die removed from station #1. The rounds per hour is very high this way and seems to produce more consistent OALs as there's less tilt effect of shell plate from not resizing cases. I did this in pursuit of utmost consistency in reloading match loads but it also circumvented the primer feed issue. For range practice/plinking loads, I press primed and reloaded in "normal" progressive mode.


But on the flip side of that coin, BDS did do a wonderful set of write ups to work the kinks out of a those lee progressives. Im not a lee user, so i dont know if its the same press. But i do know it was pretty in depth and full of seemingly useful information.
Yes, it's the same Pro 1000 press OP posted on the other thread - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=8965013#post8965013

On that thread, we addressed the most common primer feed issues and resolutions but did not discuss basic press set up and routine operations. Perhaps such discussion would have helped OP with introduction to Pro 1000 and avoided much of the problems. Perhaps I will do a detailed Pro 1000 initial set up and operations support thread with resolution mods and troubleshooting guide. ;)

Which leads me to my next thought, why was i looking at that Lee thread since i don't own one. *shrugs* That i will never know.
Maybe people are curious about presses they never got to use and interested in how thousands of Lee users successfully reload with a such subpar/low quality/piece of junk press? :D

When I started reloading, I was planning to get a Dillon progressive as that's what all the other match shooters used. Only because my reloading mentor trained me on both Dillon 550B and Pro 1000 that I considered it. Like everyone else, I thought since it was a cheaper press, it could not load as accurate of match loads as the Dillon. My mentor laughed at this and said my pistols won't know the difference as long as the finished rounds had consistent powder charges and dimensions. We even did comparison range tests with rounds loaded on both presses and the shot groups were comparable.

Had I not had that introduction to Pro 1000, I too would have been a Dillon user from the start and would be wondering what all the Lee Pro 1000 issues were about.

Knowing what I know now, if I were to do it over again, I would still choose Pro 1000 and that's why I bought 2 more kits so that I now have dedicated set ups for 9mm, 40S&W and 45ACP. It is nice to walk up to the bench and simply place a handful of cases in the collator and start reloading after verifying a few powder charge drops.

gsc3zny
July 1, 2013, 12:13 AM
I just have the regular crimp die that comes with a 3 die set

CMD-Ky
July 1, 2013, 07:47 AM
I, too, left a progressive. I started with an RCBS single. I bought a 650 and hated it. I tried a friend's RCBS Pro 2000 and didn't care for it. After several months, I bought the Redding T-7 and I enjoy reloading again. It fits my way of doing things and using the RCBS case activated powder drop, I can produce plenty of rounds. I prefer watching each die do its job one at a time and handling each round when it is finished. Lord knows, I am not knocking the Dillon so keep the long knives sheathed, progressives may not fit everyone.

ID-shooting
July 1, 2013, 08:22 AM
I as well dropped from progressive to single about 15 years ago. Started with a RCBS set up. Was new to reloading. Had a few squibs. Decided I wanted more control over each step. Not hard to bounce out a couple hundred on Sunday morning. Besides, I never did figure out how you tumble after to size and deprime as well as trim with a progressive. Gives me the opprotunity to inspect each case.

45_auto
July 1, 2013, 09:10 AM
Besides, I never did figure out how you tumble after to size and deprime as well as trim with a progressive.

When I'm doing a bunch of 223, 308, or 30-06 I do exactly that. Didn't seem real hard to figure out. Tool head with de-prime die in station 1, lube die in station 2, size/trim die in station 3. Run a few thousand through then chunk them in the tumbler.

When you're ready to load them, use another tool head with the powder drop die, bullet seater die, and crimp die.

GW Staar
July 1, 2013, 10:24 AM
I have a bunch of Lee stuff I like, even use the FCD on most of my Dillons. It's not a "hate Lee" attitude so much, just a dislike of things that don't work.

If your blood pressure will stand it try and get a Lee bullet feeder to work for a few thousand rounds...

My blood pressure is high enough. A better way to say that is, "Warning, save your blood pressure. the Lee bullet feeder was created on one of Richard Lee's bad days."

As many know, I love to tinker....and tinker I did to help a good friend get his Pro 1000 to work.....especially the primer feed. We got it working quite well actually, but it requires cleaning more often than other machines (and lots of graphite), and the primer feed works with CCI primers 10 times better than other brands we tried.....like maybe that primer was the "designed with" primer?? It also does best as a dedicated press....that is one caliber. Fortunately, they are cheap enough to do just that.

627PCFan
July 1, 2013, 10:33 AM
Been using a buddies LNL, wouldnt buy one. Too much tinkering and troublshooting. I just dont trust it. Not tried a Dillon but its not worth the money to me. The Rock Chucker gets everything in my shop.

Walkalong
July 1, 2013, 10:43 AM
I use my LNL for 99% of my loading now. I never use it to its "full potential", as I do not prime on it, and size/decap (And hand prime) before actually loading anything. For rifle, after sizing decapping only, then hand priming, it leaves seating only, or seating/crimping. With proper care/brass selection/prep/load procedure it will load ammo just as straight as a single stage. So basically I use it like a single stage for some things.

Arkansas Paul
July 1, 2013, 10:54 AM
I bought a Lee Pro 1000 with all the goodies-bullet feeder, multi tube assemblies, shellplates, etc but just could never get it to work right.

I'm not bashing Lee here. I have many of their products and they work fine for me.
However, judging all progressive presses by a Lee Pro1000 is like judging all cars by a Ford Pinto.

jmorris
July 1, 2013, 10:59 AM
I personally prefer to be more involved with each round and feel its much safer this way.

I use to feel the same way but "To err is human..." I trust my automated machines more than a lot of folks.

As a matter of fact I can count on one hand the reloaders that I would fire their ammunition out of one of my firearms and I know hundreds of people that reload.

stavman11
July 1, 2013, 11:26 AM
I have 3 Lee pro 1000, and a lee pro was my 1st Press

I still have not had any Primer issues, or indexing issues... Maybe im just Lucky... But if it was that much of an issue, youd think 1 of my 3 presses would have an issue.... Only real MOD I have done is a Small Bungie in place of the chain for the Powder dropper...

Now I dont use the case feeder in .223 or .357.... and I size and de-prime my .223 all at once..... and then load.. and they really work well for me...

I also have the bullet feeder for 9mm and it works Flawless....

Just like any technical piece of equipment... some are just not for some people... is what It is

Anyways.... back to Loading:)

mwmjones
July 1, 2013, 11:28 AM
have you ever tried a dillon setup?

stavman11
July 1, 2013, 11:40 AM
Me????

was originaly gunna get a dillon... But wasnt sure if Reloading was for me so didnt wanna drop $500+ just ta find out:D

That said.... 3 Presses later... ya I kinda Like loading:p

cfullgraf
July 1, 2013, 01:26 PM
One of the great assets of a progressive reloader is that the process can be adjusted to fit the needs of the user. Install only the dies needed to accomplish desired outcome and pull away on the handle.

While the progressive presses are designed to load from fired case to finished round, and probably the majority of progressive press users use them that way, there are times this is not desired.

Like Walkalong, I hand prime when using my progressive, although I prefer to clean my cases after resizing. I resize and clean cases shortly after shooting and store the prepared cases for a future loading session. The progressive press with only a resized die and case mouth expansion die makes that go very quick.

I have adjusted my process and made custom drop tubes so that I can switch cartridges and crank off as little as 50 rounds in no time, or spend an evening or two building inventory.

Hangingrock
July 1, 2013, 02:07 PM
I've never claimed to be a Handloader but rather a Reloader. With that said I favor the Progressive as opposed to the Single-Stage but I do have one single stage press which is used exclusively for rifle reloading. Two of the progressives are for dedicated usage one for 9mm Luger and the other for 45ACP. The third progressive is not setup dedicated to one particular cartridge.

david bachelder
July 1, 2013, 02:59 PM
I have a new LNL. It took a while for me to get things right, I'd say about 500 rounds. Now I'm almost to 1500 and the press is running great. It took a little time and some patients but the reward is good.

The biggest problem was trying to figure out exactly what was wrong. Most of the time it was me that was the problem, not the press. Tinkering is part of the hobby. I'm sure every press made requires a bit of break in and tinkering. I hear it a lot form Red to Blue to green.

Now days I need to stop loading, I'm getting a lot of ammo stacked up and unable to do any shooting. Last time I counted I had about 2000 rounds in storage and for me, thats a lot.

I would suggest a LNL to anyone looking to take the progressive dive.

As far as the OP goes, I'm glad you found something you are comfortable with.

Constrictor
July 1, 2013, 04:05 PM
I hate to bash but you started with a Lee progressive. Thats all you have to say. frustrating as hell, ive not had one but ive loaded on my buddies and its no fun.

Its a shame this has to happen over a few bucks, the amount you save is what, $100 bucks over a dillon 550?

I liken this to my other hobby, flying rc airplanes. If a guy tries to learn on his own or with a plane that isnt set up properly, or equipment thats never
gonna run right they will give up before learning to fly.

CraigC
July 1, 2013, 04:09 PM
Can't relate but it probably has something to do with that particular press. I have one turret and one Dillon 650. When I get my new bench built, I plan on having a bank of Dillons but no more single stage presses or turrets.

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 05:08 PM
I hate to bash but you started with a Lee progressive. Thats all you have to say. frustrating as hell, ive not had one but ive loaded on my buddies and its no fun.

Its a shame this has to happen over a few bucks, the amount you save is what, $100 bucks over a dillon 550?

I liken this to my other hobby, flying rc airplanes. If a guy tries to learn on his own or with a plane that isnt set up properly, or equipment thats never
gonna run right they will give up before learning to fly.
Do you really want to learn to fly with an expensive one? sounds like a bad idea...crashin and burnin....

Potatohead
July 1, 2013, 05:13 PM
Hate to jump on the bash wagon, but the Lee progressives must suck REALLY bad. Their must be some value somewhere with them, right? With all the gnashing of teeth they invoke, it seems they would be out of business.

Katitmail
July 1, 2013, 05:21 PM
Hate to jump on the bash wagon, but the Lee progressives must suck REALLY bad. Their must be some value somewhere with them, right? With all the gnashing of teeth they invoke, it seems they would be out of business.
Price is soo good - people buy them. Similar to HF I guess :) I was thinking about Lee progressive too. (I heard loadmaster little better than 1000) Finally decided to go with Dillon. Resale value is very good so I will be out not by much worth case scenario. I wanted press to produce ammo, not to be another hobby. If I had time - I would ge Lee just to play with.

Constrictor
July 1, 2013, 05:26 PM
Do you really want to learn to fly with an expensive one? sounds like a bad idea...crashin and burnin....
You get help with the training. And basically yes you learn on an expensive used plane. They fly better
You will actually learn and not give up.

Beentown
July 1, 2013, 05:30 PM
Hate to jump on the bash wagon, but the Lee progressives must suck REALLY bad. Their must be some value somewhere with them, right? With all the gnashing of teeth they invoke, it seems they would be out of business.

Lee does not live or die by the Pro. They have many other products. If the press is so bad (Pro) I wonder why no change on their part? My Crazy Uncle swears by his but he sets them up for each caliber and then leaves it. I know of two others with multiple Pros and they haven't had any major issues. One had to tinker with the priming system though as I recall.

I have only had one Lee press and it is a Classic Turret. Perfect from day one and quite easy/flexible with caliber conversion. One day when the kids are all out of the house I may have a room full of 650's but until then the CT is doing just fine. I may buy a Lee later to just try one and have first hand experience...I am a tinkerer.

frankge
July 1, 2013, 05:30 PM
I really tried to hang in there with the Lee 1000, I tried everything and loaded amny thousands on it, but in the end I dont think Lee progressives are the way to go. Got a LNL and it runs smooth with both rifle and pistol. I shoot USPSA and eat alot of ammo between me and my son. That said, I use all thier dies in the LNL, thier prep tools, and hand primers and never had any issues. I always use lee dies because they just work for half the price - I've got about 100k 9mm though the original die set. I use the Lee Turret for lowe volume stuff and I've had it for years.

Schwing
July 1, 2013, 05:37 PM
I know I am going against the grain here but I have a lee pro 1000 and love it. It was the first press I loaded on and am thinking about buying a second because I am getting too lazy to trade out carriers when I switch from small to large calibers. I have a buddy who started on a pro 1000 before buying a Dillon and he gave me a whole laundry list of tips and mods to do. He actually regrets selling his lee because he had very few issues with his as well. At the time I started reloading, I was working on half of my normal income. I figured I would start out with it and buy something else when I had more money coming in.... I do now but see no reason to upgrade. I have virtually none of the problems that are being listed here but I did take the time to trick out my press before I even used it. These tips are available with pictures (i think there is even a thread on THR). If anyone has specific questions, please let me know. I will list some below though I don't have pictures at the moment.

1. wrap a loop of 12 gauge copper wire around the post that rubs against the primer tray pin. The posts have indentations about every inch or so. If you wrap the copper wire around the post inside one of those indentations, the primer tray pin rolls over it each time you cycle the press giving the primer tray a little shake. This almost completely gets rid of the problems with the primers not feeding. The mod takes about 2 minutes and I have not had to fiddle with it or replace it since buying the press 8 months ago.

2. Put a slight bend in the shell plate ejector pin. This is the little wire pin that ejects finished rounds from the shell plate and down onto the ramp. This keeps them from getting the jamming that people talk about. This mod takes less than 1 minute. I am still using the original pin and have not had to make any further adjustments. I have never had a round jam in mine like you hear about.

3. Inside the case feeder hopper, there is a small hole in between the 4 tube holes. drill a .22lr sized hole in a penny and then use a .22 shell to secure the penny in that center hole. This will completely prevent shells that are 9MM or smaller from going through the case feeder upside down. If reloading larger than 9mm, simply remove the penny. Since doing this mode I have had less than 5 upside down shells. This mod was, by far the most time intensive... taking an entire 5 minutes.

4. Keep your dies clean especially when loading lead or hard cast. The lube likes to work its way into the seating/crimp die and can wreck havoc with your OAL.

The final tip is just keeping the whole thing clean. I keep an air compressor next to mine and blow out underneath the shell plate every 25 rounds or so. I think the biggest failing of the pro 1000 is that even a single grain of powder down below the shell plate can jam things up. I also wipe down all moving parts with prolix to clean them and lube them regularly (just about any non-oil based or dry lube will do).

I hope you can get more comfortable with your pro 1000. If you do, don't get upset for buying the single stage. I am actually ordering one myself for bullet sizing etc.

Catpop
July 1, 2013, 07:04 PM
I saw no mention of the Dillon SDB. I've used one since the late 70s with only one little glitch after an extended lay up (which Dillon took care of with out hesitation) while I dealt with some of lifes new poker hands. It was easy to use and supplied me with quality 357 foder even as we now speak. It cut 50 reloads from one hour to 10 minutes.
Now that I bang a 45acp 1911, I am faced with a new delima- SDB conversion, 550B since I already have the dies (Lee), or SDB complete dedicated to 45acp. Then another for 9mm which my son shoots. Decisions, decisions. I presently single line 45acp, 9mm, and all rifle on a 1973 Lyman Spartan, my first press and powder still dropped on a # 55.

Hondo 60
July 1, 2013, 07:39 PM
I started with a Lee Breech Loch single stage.
Once I figured out what I was doing I bought a Lee Pro1000.
I hated it! There was always something wrong. :fire: :cuss:

I finally boxed it up & bought a Lee deluxe turret.
Well it ain't so deluxe...
The worst part is the spent primers all over the place.
Maybe 10% actually go down the chute. :banghead:

Sold both of them (kept the SS)

Finally lucked into a 2nd hand Dillon 550. :p
I will NEVER go back.

tightgroup tiger
July 1, 2013, 08:56 PM
The first new press I ever bought when I was young was a pro 1000. I can't say it was a mistake but it was certainly trying at times.

I can honestly see why people get so irate over them. I have been using one for 22yrs.
I agree with BDS:
There should be a warning on the box.

Something like
"You have to be a masochist to want to use one of these",

Since I bought my LNL-AP my pro1000 just sits on the bench and does nothing but remind me that when I bought it, I couldn't afford to buy anything better at the time.
The priming system on my LNL-AP works really well and after a year I bought the case feeder for it. It also works really well. I take all the dies out and put a universal depriming die in pos 1 and deprime 9mms at 1300-1400 and hour with no problems from the case feeder.

If you would have started out with a Hornady, RCBS, or Dillon auto progressive you wouldn't have been turned against them.

Lee Pro1000? It depends on your fortitude as to how long you will last.

gojones
July 1, 2013, 10:17 PM
I started reloading with the Lyman 310 tool when I was 18. In my 20,s I bought the Rock chucker and thought I was on top of the world. Got married and kinda put everything on hold except for the annual session getting ready for hunting. Now that I am retired, I got the LNL AP and do some pistol shooting. Having more fun than I ever could have imagined. I also do not load from case to completed bullet either. But by breaking up the process, I can handle 300 to 400 rounds and do the primer pocket cleaning, tumbling and so forth and be ready to shoot by the next day. Am moving away from hand priming somewhat and using the LNL priming tool more. So far I just had to back out the left pawl half a turn to tweak the indexing. After two weeks I can break the press down and reassemble in my sleep. Don't have to rush now a days.

Crashbox
July 1, 2013, 10:41 PM
I started with an LnL progressive and still use it for loading my standard-strength .357 Magnum rounds. With the .40 S&W I use a hybrid approach- I bell, charge and semi-seat the bullets on the progressive, then do the final seating and taper crimp on the single-stage.

All of my .357 Magnum nuclear-strength rounds are done single-stage because I don't like the powder rattling out and making itself home all over the shell plate. I used to load them on the LnL AP...

All of my rifle rounds are single-stage only (currently only .405 Winchester).

All de-priming is done on the single-stage since I use an ultrasonic cleaner, and all priming of all cases is accomplished with a dedicated priming tool.

DSling
July 1, 2013, 11:09 PM
OP I've been reloading on my lnl ap for a bit (haven't hit a year yet) and love it. My mentor taught me on a rock chucker. I don't think I will give it up for a single stage but I will get a single stage to do my match loads.

Another post tracked by the government.

a2x4bbl
July 1, 2013, 11:58 PM
Have had my Hornady LNL for years now , works fine for me .Have reloaded thousands of rounds , rifle and pistol . I will do 100 rounds in 20 minutes being slow and careful. I looked at Lee stuff but the Dillon and Hornady presses just looked beefier and better built to me .A fellow at work has all Lee reloading equipment ( progressive ) and he always complains of the primer feed . Still have the Hornady single stage (which I bought first because of a lack of funds , no other reason ) . I really can't ever see getting rid of it . Maybe it's just one of those things where you should just have both. Rifle or shotgun ? Both really is better :D. Revolver or Autoloader ? Again , both is better :D. Carry gun or target pistol ? Both wins again :D. Mill or Lathe ? Both clearly the victor:D .

nooooobie
July 2, 2013, 12:18 AM
When I was a starry-eyed young buck, I dove head-first into marriage. Unlike many, I vowed I would make it work, no matter what. Yes, there were times when it would've been easier, and more satisfying to chuck it. I've been married 30 years, with much credit to my better half.

It's the same with my Pro-1000. I have set my jaw and made a vow I will make it work. I have learned a lot, and continue to learn. In return, I am satisfied with the results, most of the time, and when problems arise, I work to address them. This forum helps.

There might be a woman out there who fetches my adult beverage and doesn't complain how much I spend on my toys, but that's not the path I've chosen.

Lloyd Smale
July 2, 2013, 08:22 AM
ill put it this way. If i had to go back to single stage loading for handgun ammo id quit loading. Secondly if the lee progressives were the only brand available i would personaly rather load on a single stage.

RandyP
July 2, 2013, 08:29 AM
I am a happy satisfied Lee gear user - so sue me - LOL

For my realistic ammo needs the Classic Turret with its 150-175 round per hour output is a perfect match - and it is very budget friendly. Were there no Lee products I would not be able to afford the hobby. If I ever need to upgrade to a progressive, it WILL be the Lee Loadmaster.

Could I get a 'better' press at 3-4 times the price by buying a Dillon mega-machine? Sure. But if all I need is to go to work and the grocery store, I don't need to buy an Aston Martin. If I realistically needed the very high output of the 650/1050 machines? then THEY would be the perfect match to my needs. Dillon, RCBS, Hornady et al make SUPERB hardware.

Potatohead
July 2, 2013, 10:42 AM
You get help with the training. And basically yes you learn on an expensive used plane. They fly better
You will actually learn and not give up.
i hear you..your post reminded me of a funny story from my youth..

Constrictor
July 2, 2013, 11:00 AM
I guess it all depends on how much and what you shoot but if an average shooter shoots 200 rounds of 38 special twice a month your going to save $120 per month, $1,440 per year, $43,200.00 over 30 years the extra $200 the Dillon cost seems cheaper than Bayer aspirin from headaches for that time.

jmorris
July 2, 2013, 11:35 AM
Its a shame this has to happen over a few bucks, the amount you save is what, $100 bucks over a dillon 550?

I would say if it makes you quit even trying to load with a progressive you didn't save any money, just waisted it.

bds
July 2, 2013, 01:38 PM
Actually, it's way more than $100. Natchez has Pro 1000 kit with dies for $160 and it comes with case feeder.

Scheels/Graf has Dillon 550B for around $390 and a set of Dillon dies for $66 and you still don't have a case feeder. If you load multiple calibers, you also need to factor in caliber change costs. And Dillon 550 don't have auto index like the Pro 1000, you will need Dillon 650 for auto index.

I agree that over time, even the cost difference for 650 with case feeder and caliber changes can be justified but some reloaders may not want to or be able to spend $700 - $1200+ on a progressive set up. For them, Pro 1000 offers another progressive option that is initially affordable (Keep in mind that some of us were/are starving students/young adults who still want to shoot a lot :D).

Is Pro 1000 option for everyone? No. Is it viable for some? Probably and I wonder just how many thousands of Pro 1000 owners successfully reload on them all across the nation every month?

For me, I have become spoiled by the convenience of 3 dedicated Pro 1000 set ups for 9mm, 40S&W and 45ACP all with case feeders and my entire set up costed less than a single caliber Dillon 650 set up without the case feeder.

I have considered replacing/adding the Dillon/Hornady progressive press but when my wife asks me, "But honey, will they load more accurate ammo?" I have to ponder and tell her no.

Schwing
July 2, 2013, 01:45 PM
I agree with BDS. I purchased my pro 1000 with dies for 9mm and a case feeder for $157. I know that it is a popular press to make fun of but I just can't help but shake my head and wonder why I would ever spend 2 or 3x as much for another press that pumps out the same ammo.

.338-06
July 2, 2013, 02:14 PM
'Nother Lee user here. After about 20 years of loading I got a Pro 1000 in .223 one Christmas. BIG mistake. All the problems new users have with the Pro 1000 are multiplied in the .223. So it sat for about a year until I started loading a lot of 9mm. Got the 9mm shell plate and actually LEARNED how to use the darn thing. Now everything is roses. :p

A major problem with Lee products is that the instructions SUCK. They always have. I just got the bullet feeder for the Pro only to learn that it won't work with my Lee seating die. I'm supposed to send my seating die back to get contoured. Screw that.:cuss:

The price point can't be beat. If the instructions were better detailed there would be less complaints.

stavman11
July 2, 2013, 02:25 PM
bds... as always.... well said and Schwing... way ta SWING a Homer...LOL


i have said it, and will again... i have 3 Lee Pro's as well, just Like bds... I on the otherhand have 9mm .357 and .223

Only Primer issues i have had is .223 and its the Case issue not the feeder... now i have had a 9mm issue, kinda, just didnt watch the primer feeder and ran out....LOL... But again, my fault not the Machine

I did have issues setting up the die's in my .357 they where 38S and didnt get them backed out correctly to .357 length... But again.. that was a ME issue and not Reading the directions.... so after 6 crushed cases during setup/testing i got it dialed...

Next was my 9mm press.... since it was my 3rd.... It took me longer to open the Box than to set it up.... i also realized that the Die's where actualy setup from the Factory...WOW... never realized it with other 2 presses....LOL

then i got the Bullet feeder..... again..... setup was perfect... i had already looked at a youtube vid of setup so had an idea of the process and a couple hints if needed.. but it was a flawless setup... and just busted out 120+ on saturday in about 20min ish.... not 1 issue again.... love it


Anyways..... i didnt get a LNL didnt like the primer tube.... on press #2... chose the Lee pro over dillon for same reason... didnt like the Primer tube..... and since i have NO issues besides ME issues with the lee pro.... i figured SCREW It... Im getting 2 more


Now I would agree that the instructions are not the best... heck the Multi Tube Bullet feeder option didnt even come with ANY... LOL...... But so many Youtube and threads for setup.... no reason ya cant get it dialed

Sorry for the Long post.... but was kinda bored and Time for a post:D

Katitmail
July 2, 2013, 02:40 PM
For me, I have become spoiled by the convenience of 3 dedicated Pro 1000 set ups for 9mm, 40S&W and 45ACP all with case feeders and my entire set up costed less than a single caliber Dillon 650 set up without the case feeder.

Well. I wouldn't call collator "case feeder". Dillon case feeder does just that. Feeds brass. You dump it and it feeds it. You can dump 300-400 cases into bucket and just load.

Dillon 650 comes with case feeding mechanism, so you can use Lee's collator just as you do on a Lee.. I just don't consider it "case feeding"

Some people (like me) don't have space for 3 dedicated presses. I have LCT and 650 and I made same mount bases. If I want to use one or another - I have to remove 4 bolts to get one out and another in.

Sapper771
July 2, 2013, 02:57 PM
I started out in a single stage. I loaded 5,000 rounds of 45acp on it before I got my Lock n Load for Christmas. I dont think I could live without my progressive press.

I still use my Rock Chucker for rifle rounds and a few specialty pistol rounds, but the progressive gets the high volume runs.

I did try to load some .223 ammo on my Lock N Load, but I ran into cartridge headspace issues, so I stopped using it for rifle rounds.

mtrmn
July 2, 2013, 03:04 PM
I love many Lee products--the progressives are not included in this statement. Bought a Loadmaster and spent several days setting it up. Watched all kinds of videos on youtube etc etc. Never loaded a single round on it. Boxed it up and sent it back.
Spent a good bit more money on the Blue Koolaid. Had it set up and loading in a couple HOURS rather than days. Progressive loading is sweet when your buzzin on the Blue.

bds
July 2, 2013, 03:20 PM
Progressive loading is sweet when your buzzin on the Blue.
Sure is and buzzin in any other color. ;) :D

Hangingrock
July 2, 2013, 05:17 PM
Setting up a progressive press requires patience and attention to detail.

The previous statement is so true and applies beyond progressive presses to mechanical devices in general. There are individuals challenged by all things mechanical. The smarter ones admit to it and there are others wish they had. Another observation of mine is that in order to go fast one must go slow first.

You betcha there is a learning curve sometimes fraught with difficulties and sometimes not dependent on an individualís aptitude. On the other hand there are mechanical designs which are a tinkers delight and problematic on average for most others.

tightgroup tiger
July 2, 2013, 05:52 PM
You betcha there is a learning curve sometimes fraught with difficulties and sometimes not dependent on an individualís aptitude. On the other hand there are mechanical designs which are a tinkers delight and problematic on average for most others.

That statement is very well put.

joecil
July 2, 2013, 06:08 PM
My first experience with reloading was two used Lee Pro 1000 presses and I sold one right away but got a good deal on them with many other items. I loaded a couple thousand rounds with it after watching Cowboy T videos on it. It was time well spent as I never had a problem and got good results. However it wasn't for me as too much going on at one time for my tastes. With the money I got for the first one and also sold the second one I bought a Lee Classic Pro, a Lee Classic Cast and a Lee Hand Press. I've been using them now for 2 years and very happy with the setup. I really didn't give up much on speed with the turret using the indexing connected but also can load things I couldn't with the Progressive press. What I could do on it I did on the single state LCC press including 1 1/4 dies needed for doing 12 ga brass shot shell ammo loaded with black powder. I can still do about 100 - 150 rounds an hour but don't shoot as much as I used to even with Cowboy action shooting.

CharlieDeltaJuliet
July 2, 2013, 08:21 PM
I use a single stage if it is one of my precision rifles. I really enjoy making sure I have the exact powder charge etc. I am one of those that relaxes and blows off steam while reloading.

cfullgraf
July 2, 2013, 10:33 PM
For the most part, get the progressive press whose color best matches the decor in your reloading room.

That is as good a criteria for the choice as anything else.:)

stubbicatt
July 3, 2013, 09:50 AM
My first progressive was a Pacific, the precursor to the Hornady. I used it for a couple years, and while it was "OK" it was eventually sold for a Loadmaster. I loaded many, many cartridges on the Loadmaster, as I was feeding a 1921/28 Colt Thompson and a pre sample FAL G1. Like the rest of you, I had issues with the priming system on that press, and hated trying to empty the spent primer reservoir through that little door in the bottom of the ram. Eventually it too was sold.

I went several years after that with single stage RCBS presses of one flavor or other, and had a CoAX in there for awhile. Then, thanks to Hoser, I bought a Dillon Super 1050, and a couple thousand dollars of accessories. Now THAT was how a progressive press is supposed to work. I loaded up so darned many cartridges, that I didn't need to use it anymore! So, due to need of funds and lack of need of the press, it too was sold, and I'm back to single stage or LCT turret press.

I have not tried the other Dillon machines, so I cannot comment. But each one of mine had unique bugs that needed fixing. Ferinstance on the 1050, I ended up modifying a 223 case and some tubing to direct spent primers into a trash can. Had to hammer that case into the little hole in the bottom of the shellplate carrier. Too, I glued a 45 caliber, 230 grain bullet to the top of the primer follower to assure reliable primer feeding. The swage rod was a great idea, and while it worked "OK" the Dillon SuperSwage tool is better IMO.

I think one has to be flexible and willing to tinker to get things right. Go slow and easy and keep your eye on everything.

jcwit
July 3, 2013, 10:14 AM
I never got as far as a progressive press. As far as I got was a turrent press, which I liked but I've ended up with 2 single stages mounted side by side on my bench and just like reloading that way. I now have 4 or 5 presses in storage, for why? Nobody knows, not even me.

I even go so far as to use the older Lee Loaders at times just for the relaxing aspect, but I will add I use a Sinclair Arbor Press instead of a mallet, and have fashioned a stop bushing to make all the crimps the same. Wish I could buy a Lee Loader in all the calibers I reload for.

To me its a relaxing hobby, sorta like taking an afternoon drive on the back roads and driving slowely to enjoy the scenery.

PhilMc
July 3, 2013, 10:40 AM
I have a Rockchucker and 2 Pro1000's and have made thousands of rounds on them, mainly 9mm and 45acp. Yes the pro1000's take a little tinkering,but as someone else said, its nice just to check powder and go. I also really enjoy reloading and am a mechanical technician by trade so fixing a few quirks is no big deal for me.

Phil

Potatohead
July 3, 2013, 02:29 PM
I now have 4 or 5 presses in storage, for why? Nobody knows, not even me

watcha got? interested in selling? send me a PM if so

larryh1108
July 3, 2013, 03:10 PM
I have to ask the people here of a real number of rounds used per month (or year) to justify a progressive or even a turret. I am fine with my single stage. I have a system that works for me. 500 rounds a month is easy while working in the evening, after work. I believe I could do 1000 rounds a month with ease with the single stage. I do understand why people who shoot for competition or who like to shoot thousands of rounds a month for fun need one but I question those who go thru all the bother, space and cost to produce 500 rounds a month. Anybody here know what round count justifies a high volume setup? I believe many get it because of the cool factor and not because they really need the high tech setup.

RandyP
July 3, 2013, 03:18 PM
Many high volume shooters place a high value on their spare time and prefer not to expend it sitting at a reloading bench for hours on end to meet their realistic ammo needs. For the shooters in this category the progressives are a perfect match to their needs.

IMHO there is no one 'right way' or 'right press' for reloaders. It is however ALL good and I am very pleased that there is a way for everyone and every budget to participate in this hobby. From the $30 Lee whack-a-mole Loader to the $30,000+ Camdex machines.

PJSprog
July 3, 2013, 04:21 PM
I've loaded on the same single-stage Lee press since I started in 1990. .38spl, .357mag, .45acp, .223, 7x57, & .30-06. I've tried a friend's progressive, and just didn't like it. Took all the fun out of it for me. I guess I just like that more intimate interaction with all stages. I like making the ammo just as much as shooting it.

Katitmail
July 3, 2013, 04:25 PM
I have to ask the people here of a real number of rounds used per month (or year) to justify a progressive or even a turret.

It depends on what your time worth. I want to shoot my own consistant ammo and save. But. My time is valuable to me. I want to spend no more than 2-3 hours a month for reloading. And I want to shoot 1000 rounds. That puts me into progressive press customers.

With saved time I will make $$ difference pretty quick doing what I'm doing for living.

Hangingrock
July 3, 2013, 08:46 PM
Anybody here know what round count justifies a high volume setup? I believe many get it because of the cool factor and not because they really need the high tech setup.

Tell you honest I'm not enthused about reloading. For myself I'd rather be doing something else with my time. For others its a hobby. Good for them I'm glad they find enjoyment in the endeavor. I use progressives to keep reloading time to a minimum.:)

A Pause for the Coz
July 4, 2013, 12:38 AM
I have found with all the presses I have. All of them have things they do well and things they dont.
I have a RCBS progressive that works great on every thing except 223 and 357 mag, My Hornady progressive chokes on short cases but kicks out 223 and 300 Black out, and 357 mag like a dream.
There are things I really like about my LEE turret press. And things that drive me nuts.
I like my RCBS Rock chucker but its far from perfect. My Lee Classic cast single stage fit the rest.

Do a few google searches and you will see loads and loads of fixes and tweeks for Dillon's. I dont have one but I suspect they are not perfect ether.

Find what you press is good at and roll with it. Work around the rest. r buy more presses like me.
Oh if you want to rid your self of a pro1000 shoot me a PM. I bet I can find a role for it.

stubbicatt
July 4, 2013, 09:32 AM
It depends on what your time worth. I want to shoot my own consistant ammo and save. But. My time is valuable to me. I want to spend no more than 2-3 hours a month for reloading. And I want to shoot 1000 rounds. That puts me into progressive press customers.

With saved time I will make $$ difference pretty quick doing what I'm doing for living.
Yep. Progressive for you! --There was a time I too was in this camp, but then I loaded up a metric buttload of ammo, and then stopped shooting action games! LOL. Still have a bunch of 223's and no rifle to shoot them in! My stash of 308's is very deep. I'll shoot 'em up one day probably.

Barr
July 4, 2013, 09:53 AM
I cannot recommend the Lee Pro 1000 either. I loaded over 10k rounds on mine but it was always a constant struggle. The primers would occasionally jam, the powder dispenser would fail to dispense powder, and the case feeder would constantly bind up the press. Caliber changeovers were tedious and time consuming.

The straw that broke the camel's back was loading 500 rounds of .38 Special with a mixture of squib loads that would stick in the barrel and having a swelled cylinder due to tumbling media that was unknowingly left in a case. Since then I use a Powder Check Die in a 4+ station progressive. Easily the best spend of your money on a progressive.

I bought a Hornady LNL and could not be happier. Rarely have any primer problems and the feed/index of the cases runs like a swiss watch. I like having the extra two stations for a powder check die. I like Lee for many things including their hand press and dies but the Pro 1000 is not one of them.

For all those people out there who say "This would never happen to me.", it can and will. All you can do is prevent mistakes by learning from others' mistakes. If you never make a mistake you are not trying new things and learning new skills.

bds
July 4, 2013, 10:20 AM
Oh my. The OP did not post which progressive is better than Pro 1000 rather go from progressive to single stage.
Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive?


I cannot recommend the Lee Pro 1000 either. I loaded over 10k rounds on mine but it was always a constant struggle. The primers would occasionally jam
Yes, I would agree that Pro 1000 is not for everyone as the gravity based primer feed system requires several operational factors to be in place and not all users of Pro 1000 check them before starting each reloading session. ;)

the powder dispenser would fail to dispense powder, and the case feeder would constantly bind up the press. Caliber changeovers were tedious and time consuming.
But these problems are likely based on failure to follow press operations.

I bought a Hornady LNL and could not be happier.
Great. We usually recommend new reloaders start out with the single stage press and that's what OP decided to do.
I bought a single stage Lee press and really enjoy it.

jmorris
July 4, 2013, 10:50 AM
I have to ask the people here of a real number of rounds used per month (or year) to justify a progressive or even a turret. I am fine with my single stage. I have a system that works for me. 500 rounds a month is easy while working in the evening, after work. I believe I could do 1000 rounds a month with ease with the single stage.

I am not sure we have the same idea when it comes to "with ease" 1000 rounds takes less than an hour on a few of my set ups to load (-prep) and that is without touching a single case or bullet. In the case of the autodriven one, you don't even have to crank the handle or even be in the room except to add 100 primers, cases and bullets every 5 min.

With the addition of a kiddo to my life I only go through 20k a year or so but it's nice to be able to load the ammo I need for the next match while being with her vs trying to keep her out of the room.

Walkalong
July 4, 2013, 10:59 AM
I love reloading a few test rounds, or playing with a few cases getting ready to do so etc, but when it comes to cranking out 500 or 1000 of a proven product for stock, faster is better. I don't try to set any speed records, but I can still get done much, much faster with a progressive.

There are a lot of reasons faster is better for many reloading tasks. :)

RealGun
July 4, 2013, 11:19 AM
bds - Oh my. The OP did not post which progressive is better than Pro 1000 rather go from progressive to single stage.

gsc3zny
Has anyone else ever dropped down to single stage from progressive?

But the OP's question is spurious in the context of his very next sentence:
I bought a Lee Pro 1000 with all the goodies-bullet feeder, multi tube assemblies, shellplates, etc but just could never get it to work right

The real topic here is one more round of Lee bashing, and thus the longevity of the thread and your being on full alert.

stavman11
July 4, 2013, 11:29 AM
LOL

Ya us who like the pro 1000 are in our Defensive Posture for sure....HAHAHAH


that Said.... I dont think I would ever get a single stage Press... In .357 i change it up quite a Bit, powder measure, Type etc, and is easy...

Now if i start loading a bunch more different calibers... I may get a Classic Turret.. or similar, something fast to change Calibers...

But my Time is needed to usualy shoot at least 1000-1500 rds a month... trips to range 2x a week normaly... (Monsoons in town so havent shot this week:mad:)


So for me a progressive is what is needed for my shooting style

Barr
July 4, 2013, 11:37 AM
I was echoing the OP's frustration with this product to let him know he is not alone.

To answer the OP question:
I use a Redding single stage Big Boss II press for all rifle and some handgun loading in small qty. .45 ACP, .38 Special, .357 Magnum, .40 S&W, and 9mm are loaded on the progressive only.

As to Lee Bashing:
I have used many of their products such as dies, hand tools, progressive press, hand presses etc. They make great beginner tools and their dies are a great value. The problem with "Lee Bashing" is most folks base comments and opinions on things they have heard. I speak from experience with their products, I would not buy a Lee Progressive. They do make good single stage presses.

If you do not agree with my conclusions on Lee progressive presses, that is ok too. I am sure you are happy with your choice of given brands/tools. The advice is free and worth the price paid for it.

Lee Progressives:
I can follow directions and enjoy working with mechanical systems. Fixing a device and constantly adjusting it when it should work is frustrating. Its why some people buy older American cars vs modern foreign imports, for some its a hobby and others its a serivceable tool.

As to beginner press:
I did not recommend a progressive press for beginners. If anything I usually recommend a Lee Hand Press for beginners, for $40 they can find very quickly if reloading is for them or not. If they do enjoy the hobby, they can always sell the press for $25 and invest in a nicer press.

Hope you guys enjoy the 4th! Its raining here and a good reloading day in the shop.

RainDodger
July 4, 2013, 11:46 AM
For me, hand loading is more than half the fun of shooting. It's an art in itself. That said, I ONLY use a progressive Dillon Square Deal press for pistol, and I didn't have that until I had already been a hand loader for 15 years.

Everything else, including bulk amounts of 5.56 are loaded on a single stage. I use a Redding Ultra-Mag press for all sizing (nice and smooth, big press with lots of leverage), and a very old RCBS Jr. press (my first press in 1969) for all bullet seating.

I would highly discourage any new hand loader to get a progressive right off the bat. I always recommend a single stage press and a good manual for new guys. Learning what's happening at every stage of the process and the dangers involved is a good thing. Perhaps that's why I've never had one single bad round make it as far as a chamber (shouldn't have said that).... anyway, a repeatable process and ingrained habits while loading will keep you out of trouble - and that's hard for a beginner with a progressive press! My thoughts.

No experience with Lee, ever, so can't add to that.

bds
July 4, 2013, 12:26 PM
As to Lee Bashing:
I have used many of their products such as dies, hand tools, progressive press, hand presses etc. They make great beginner tools and their dies are a great value. The problem with "Lee Bashing" is most folks base comments and opinions on things they have heard. I speak from experience with their products, I would not buy a Lee Progressive. They do make good single stage presses.
Thank you, very good point. Whether the post is positive or negative, they should be based on first-hand review of equipment/products based on actual experience.

If you do not agree with my conclusions on Lee progressive presses, that is ok too. I am sure you are happy with your choice of given brands/tools.
Actually, I agree with most posters' comments about Pro 1000. What I disagree is to the extent. I do not think it's a totally useless press but a press that's workable once the user understands the requirements for proper press operations which is applicable to any progressive press. I think too many users buy the Pro 1000 due to its value for the amout of equipment you get (a complete progressive kit including dies which is very attractive) expecting the press to just work from day one and when it doesn't, simply blaming the press for problems users caused is not "High Road".

I was destined to buy a Dillon press but fate derailed me into starting with the Pro 1000. In some ways, it's been a curse and a blessing. After having help set up numerous reloaders on Pro 1000, I think a better instruction manual and a DVD may help.

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