lyman tru line jr?


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car15bill
July 4, 2013, 06:54 PM
I was browsing on ebay earlier and scored a lyman tru line jr in bad shape, with a 55 powder measure and unknown dies. I know its not the most economical thing to do, but I was thinking of restoring it and setting it up for exclusive use with my also obsolete 225 Winchester. these use the older lyman 310 dies, but besides that, I don't know much about them, other than its a turret press, and a very small one at that

anyone have any info on these presses? good, bad, indifferent? anyone else think to restore a neglected press for good project?

the description said the ram was frozen, but I cant see a little Kroil and a mallet not fixing that.

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NCsmitty
July 4, 2013, 08:36 PM
The Lyman 55 measure is the treasure here, the tru line not so much, especially if you have to put money into it. If it's just sweat equity at work, then go for it.
IMO, the 55 measure is one of the most accurate measures for the money, if you learn how to use it properly, and that includes using the knocker consistently. It's great metering all types of powders.


NCsmitty

FROGO207
July 4, 2013, 10:31 PM
As far as the 55 goes the older Lyman/Ideal books (from the 50's) had a chart that helped you set up the measure to meter consistent loads with all then available propellants. If you ever see one somewhere snag it.
I have restored a few old presses for the fun of it in the past. Now the 310 dies are smaller than the standard 7/8X14 dies. There is a thread in adapter you can buy (from C4-HD IIRC) that allows you to use the 310 dies in other newer presses.

car15bill
July 4, 2013, 11:01 PM
lol, this was a losing deal from the go, I saw it and wanted it for a project, anyone can buy a lee turret for less money, right?

I agree that the 55 is the bulk of the value here, I had one in the past, and am looking to replace my all plastic lee with something a little more substantial, that will last for the rest of my life.

car15bill
July 4, 2013, 11:07 PM
are you familiar with taking the turret head and having it drilled and tapped to 7/8-14? I see there are people who have done this, and another guy was making new turret heads in 7/8-14 that I found in a google search.

I'm not so sure that I want to drill and tap it, but I am also debating paying the price for dies that the 310 shop wants for them, at 80$, it seems more versatile to just drill and tap and use my 40$ rcbs dies.

rcmodel
July 4, 2013, 11:18 PM
The 310 dies only can neck-size.

And I seriously doubt the Tru-Line Jr. is strong enough to FL size much more then pistol brass with 7/8"-14 dies.

I'd write it off and refurbish & enjoy the Ideal #55 powder measure!
Then refurbish & sell the Tru-Line Jr. on eBay again to recoup your money.

In the end, you got to refurbish them both, and got the best powder measure they ever made, free.

rc

A Pause for the Coz
July 4, 2013, 11:39 PM
I have a couple of them. Cheap and free.
One is set up with 310 dies just for my 30-30 plinking loads. And the 2nd I put a Turret upgrade and use with standard dies and an shell holder adapter. Stand alone for my 32 S&WL loads.
Good for use as a 3rd or 4th press or if you just want to.

Any new press will out perform it. But thats not the point.
Using a piece of history is. Some times I am just in that kinda mood.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d66/Kelly2215/100_84932.jpg

car15bill
July 5, 2013, 10:07 PM
write it off? and lose out on hours of tinkering on an old, obsolete piece of machinery? NEVER!!!

Thats half the reason I bought it, just for the project. I know I could just be pragmatic, and buy a lee turret or a progressive, and be bucks and time ahead. But, I think it will be more satisfying bringing something back from crusty junk and using it,

car15bill
July 5, 2013, 10:12 PM
Pause for the Coz, cool presses! are the 310 dies any diff to use than regular modern dies? how do you like the conversion turret head?


also, what do you mean any new press will outperform it?

44vaquero
July 6, 2013, 12:58 PM
Hi Car15bill, I don't post here often I tend to spend more time on the Castboolits forum. I do however own a very nice Lyman Tru-line Jr. that has been converted to use 7/8x14 dies. I still have the original turret head and assorted dies for .45 Colt and .22 Hornet. It is now dedicated to reloading .32 magnums and I have mounted a nice vintage #55 to the 4th station.

I have not purchased the J to X conversion shell holder since J type shell holders in pistol calibers are easy to locate the .32 was the hardest to find allowing for the great current interest in .32 Mag/.327!

I bent a length of .177 caliber barrel to make a new more efficient handle, leaving the original in the box untouched.

It's a great little press to use as my friend Seagiant says "Older presses have a soul" and using them is satisfying on another level altogether. Is it faster or cleaner to use? Nope! It tosses primers and debris everywhere when de-priming and is slow compared to my Lee Turret.

Used within her limits, she is a fine press capable of making accurate ammunition and providing years reloading satisfaction.

car15bill
July 6, 2013, 02:06 PM
I saw some postings over at that forum about these presses, are there any 7/8-14 tool heads still available? I saw a post that said they were not.

44vaquero
July 6, 2013, 02:33 PM
Yes, they are still available. On E-bay they have gotten expensive. I have seen a few Jr.'s up for sale on E-bay with them already installed. That's the way to go.

I tracked down the guy that makes them and purchased it direct from him. All totaled I have about a $130.00 invested in this press. Could I purchased something else? Sure but that's not the point, it's a cool old press to use.

If you decide you want one send me a PM and I can give you his contact info.

And yes! Those are Hornady New Dimension TIN in .32 magnum.

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