So you want the best firearm lubricant?


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HKGuns
July 7, 2013, 10:35 AM
Read this article.

Lubrication 101 (http://www.grantcunningham.com/lubricants101.html)

Linked below is, per the article, the best oil and grease you can buy for your lubricating your pistols and rifles.

I only recently learned about this stuff and purchased it and it works extremely well. Being food grade is a plus but there are other more scientific reasons for using it which appear to be true based on my limited experience. This oil is great and the grease is white, which is a plus, and both appear to work extremely well.

Lubriplate (http://www.lubriplate.com/Online-Store/Rifle-Greases.aspx)

I now use the SFL-0 grease and the FMO-350AW spray oil. This stuff is food safe and has all of the right properties for firearms grease and oil.

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Water-Man
July 7, 2013, 11:22 AM
It's been around a long time.

481
July 7, 2013, 11:48 AM
Eh. I'll stick with Mobil 1 5w30. It's been doing very well as a gun lubricant for nearly two decades for me and with zero corrosion.

MikeJackmin
July 7, 2013, 11:53 AM
I see nothing to disagree with in that article, but I would add that a good firearms oil should also be safe to get on wood, plastic, and rubber, not smell bad enough to annoy the wife, and be harmless to your health, even when it gets all over your hands for an extended period of time. This applies to cleaners, as well.

I'm getting to the point where I rarely use grease anymore. Once I got in the habit of running a drop of Mobil 1 Synthetic down the slide rails of my glock, I've used it in place of grease for almost everything and it seems to work fine, and it even seems to shed dirt a little better. Whenever I use grease on a slide rail, I am eventually cleaning off a thin, dirty, abrasive-looking paste, no matter how thinly I apply it. Grease still has a place (particularly on aluminum-framed guns with steel slides) but I'm coming around to the idea that it's more of a specialty thing associated with certain models of guns rather than a general-purpose lubricant.

My approach now is good 'ol hoppes gun oil for general lubrication and undemanding anti-corrosion use, and Mobil 1 Synthetic where I'd normally use grease, except in those special cases where grease is really necessary (and for that I use the purple automotive stuff). I clean with Ballistol and water, and use Eezox for demanding anti-corrosion duties (for which it works extraordinarily well).

FWIW.

shockwave
July 7, 2013, 11:58 AM
Don't overlook Royal Purple Synthetic Gun Oil (http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Purple-10036-Performance-Multipurpose/dp/B000FUNZF2) - this stuff is good. Motor oil will get the job done, but the Royal Purple is less prone to attracting dirt or dust.

Because you need so little, one can will last you years.

joecil
July 7, 2013, 12:07 PM
I use Royal Purple in my 90 Mustang GT and have since it had 2400 miles on it. Never used it on a gun though nor for that matter any oil for cars. I prefer something like Tetra Grease and CLP for the most part, but then I shoot and clean my guns often so rarely a need for long term storage.

mljdeckard
July 7, 2013, 12:10 PM
I don't have anything against grease per se, but I think that a lot of wet lube is best for ARs. For handguns, I seem to do well with 5w30 synthetic and break-free CLP. Maybe if I had something like an M1A with a longer bolt stroke I would use grease. But for my M-1 carbine, I just don't run it that hard.

There are a lot of new lubes coming out all the time that may well be miraculous for I know, but as of now, I don't see any evidence that my conventional lubes aren't working just fine.

Library Guy
July 7, 2013, 12:10 PM
This is a well written article but there is at least one inconsistency with Mr. Grantís observations and conclusions. He disparages ďplain mineral oilsĒ while praising Lubriplate FMO-AW. But according to the MSDS, Lubriplate FMO-AW is white mineral oil.

Perhaps there is a subtle distinction Iím missing.

For what itís worth, I use Ballistol which is food safe mineral oil.

Semper Circa,
LG Roy

Water-Man
July 7, 2013, 12:30 PM
I'm now using FrogLube CLP on all my guns. So far, so good.

HKGuns
July 7, 2013, 01:32 PM
I didn't post this as a thread so everyone could chime in with what they use. I posted it so those who read it might learn something. Then again, if you've been doing something for 50 years there is probably no sense in changing now.

Frog lube is quickly being found to be snake-oil with some properties that don't mix well with firearms as it doesn't provide adequate rust protection.

Z1D2
July 7, 2013, 02:01 PM
Thanks for the heads up.
That being said a gun shop owner informed me when I ran out of oil, something I had was good to use. Its 3-in-1 oil. He said it was even used on commercial sewing machines, guns, ball gloves and such. He said not to use WD40 it would rust the He££ out of weapons. So I have bought more 3-in-1 oil and its cheaper...

JohnBT
July 7, 2013, 02:06 PM
I read that article years ago, but back then the recommended Lubriplate was only available by the gallon.

I see now that someone has packaged it in syringes. Two 15cc syringes and 4 ounces of oil for $16.95.

www.lubrikit.com

Even the old Lubriplate grease from the '50s and '60s would work on a gun. Mostly we used it to grease the hood, trunk and door latches.

JohnBT
July 7, 2013, 02:12 PM
Larry Vickers on lubrication.

http://vickerstactical.com/tactical-tips/weapon-lubrication

HKGuns
July 7, 2013, 02:31 PM
I see now that someone has packaged it in syringes. Two 15cc syringes and 4 ounces of oil for $16.95.

The link I provided is directly to Lubriplate and you can get a lifetime supply for what the syringes cost you. This is exactly why I provided the links. Lubriplate figured out their product was useful in our industry and are now selling directly to gun owners.

PLEASE DON'T BUY THOSE EXPENSIVE SYRINGES!!

buckhorn_cortez
July 7, 2013, 02:36 PM
Linked below is, per the article, the best oil and grease you can buy for your lubricating your pistols and rifles.

Article is a general overview that doesn't address some lubrication technologies including nano-particles, polarity, etc. I'm also unclear as to where something is claimed as "the best oil and grease you can buy" - and how that claim is supported with facts as opposed to personal opinion.

You may want to spend some time reading the information on Bob's the Oil Guy (http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/) if you're that interested in lubrication.

HKGuns
July 7, 2013, 02:46 PM
Thanks for the link buckhorn, these are guns not motors. Everything on here is opinion in case you didn't notice.

threefeathers
July 7, 2013, 03:15 PM
Thank you for the information, I'm going to stick with EEZOX, CLP, and Kroil.

taliv
July 7, 2013, 03:21 PM
I didn't post this as a thread so everyone could chime in with what they use. I posted it so those who read it might learn something.
you're kidding, right?

I only recently learned about this stuff and purchased it and it works extremely well.

call us back when you have been using it for a few years, in lots of different conditions and firing schedules.

got a link to someone claiming frog lube is snake oil?
i used it for a while on an AR. it worked ok, but I just didn't like it. smells nice.

hso
July 7, 2013, 03:28 PM
I didn't post this as a thread so everyone could chime in with what they use. I posted it so those who read it might learn something.

That's kinda contradictory isn't it?

Or are you saying that your opinion is the only valid one? If so, you need to state your qualifications that give you superior professional knowledge in this technical area. If not, you're providing an opinion as well.

Flash!
July 7, 2013, 04:08 PM
I work for a company that makes and services food equipment..... I never considered using our food grade lubricants on my guns before now..... But I will now.... it makes sense....all the food equipment is stainless steel and needs the ultimate in lubrication.... and food equipment is exposed daily to a harsh environment

rondog
July 7, 2013, 04:15 PM
I usually use Weapon Shield for a liquid lube and Mobil 1 Synthetic Grease as a grease. Comments?

Potatohead
July 7, 2013, 04:25 PM
My approach now is good 'ol hoppes gun oil for general lubrication and undemanding anti-corrosion use, and Mobil 1 Synthetic where I'd normally use grease,

Can you (or anyone) expound on this? Can you give an example of the two different uses on where you apply them on the firearm? In other words when or where would you usually use grease and when or where would you use general lube for undemanding anti-corrosion? Am i supposed to be putting grease somewhere? (I use lube)

I'm not sure if this is considered a hijack, it's somewhat on topic..sorry if so.

hardluk1
July 7, 2013, 04:39 PM
hkguns You a lubriplat dealer?? Sounds like it. I'll pass .

Sam Cade
July 7, 2013, 04:53 PM
Thanks for the link buckhorn, these are guns not motors.

AH...but self-loading firearms ARE motors.

They convert chemical energy (via internal combustion of fuel) into reciprocating motion.

Rick McC.
July 7, 2013, 05:23 PM
I prefer Eezox over all else.

Rick

481
July 7, 2013, 05:31 PM
AH...but self-loading firearms ARE motors.

They convert chemical energy (via internal combustion of fuel) into reciprocating motion.
I never thought of it that way, but you are right. Of course, the "piston" is kind of a "one shot proposition". (Sorry, could resist the pun) :)

Fast Frank
July 7, 2013, 05:40 PM
My dad had a little metal tube of lubriplate in his gun cleaning box way back when I was a kid. I remember seeing it when cleaning the .22.

I'm guessing that was somewhere around the mid '60s

I assume he used it on his Luger pistol that he had back then.

I used that little tube of grease on several different guns over the years, and it worked OK, I guess.

I have since tried lots of other grease type lubes on a wide assortment of guns.

My take on the subject?

What matters is the thickness of the lube. Some greases are almost liquid, and others are very thick and waxy.

I haven't been able to see any big difference between mineral, synthetic, and food type greases at all.

So it becomes a compromise between the grease staying where I put it, and the drag that the grease puts into the moving parts.

My Kimber pistol, for example, doesn't like the slide being slowed down by grease on the rails. It just plain works better with light oil lubing the slide.

The spring in my AR carbine likes a thin layer of thick grease on it. It quiets the "Twang" and makes it move butter smooth. A thin grease slings off and makes a mess everywhere.

In my mind, there is no one perfect lube for all applications. It requires an assortment of lubes and experimentation to discover what works for a given situation.

Deltaboy
July 7, 2013, 05:49 PM
I used CLP since it came out and I use Mobil 1 synthetic red grease as needed.

wickedsprint
July 7, 2013, 05:50 PM
Been using CLP for years. Keeps the rust off better than anything else I've tried.

RetiredUSNChief
July 7, 2013, 05:56 PM
I've always used the typical over-the-counter gun oils found at Walmart and such and never had a problem.

Based on recent reading, I've just topped off my little oil bottle with the dregs from the 5 quart oil jug of Mobil 1 5W30 after my last oil change on the car. Presuming I never have any problems with this (and I seriously doubt it), I'll probably stick with this tactic for the rest of my life. Beats paying big bucks for a tiny oil bottle.

:)

doc2rn
July 7, 2013, 05:58 PM
Where is Mr. Berryhill when you need him. That man knows more about wonder lube than anyone I know.

Water-Man
July 7, 2013, 06:12 PM
Some think the lube they're using is the best.

Others keep an open mind about it.

Then there are those who call another's choice "snake oil".:rolleyes:

Deltaboy
July 7, 2013, 06:25 PM
Yep when CLP runs out I pick up a quart of Royal purple . Before CLP I used Hops gun oil or 3 in one oil. I keep a open mind and I clean with Ed' s Red.

rondog
July 7, 2013, 06:28 PM
If it rotates, oil it. If it slides, grease it. So I've always been told. And Lubriplate grease was issued for M1 Garands and M1 Carbines in WWII.

MikeJackmin
July 7, 2013, 06:29 PM
My approach now is good 'ol hoppes gun oil for general lubrication and undemanding anti-corrosion use, and Mobil 1 Synthetic where I'd normally use grease,

Can you (or anyone) expound on this? Can you give an example of the two different uses on where you apply them on the firearm? In other words when or where would you usually use grease and when or where would you use general lube for undemanding anti-corrosion? Am i supposed to be putting grease somewhere? (I use lube)

Most guns have a user's manual that describes the recommended lubrication for that gun. With few exceptions, I'll use Mobil 1 where grease would normally be recommended.

For example, I use it on pistol slide rails, and on the odd little spots in a pistol that get worn to a shiny spot by motion of the action. Depending on the pistol, this includes places like the top of the barrel, the part of the barrel lug where it bears on the slide release, and so on. I'll also use it along the bolt raceway on a bolt-action rifle. The idea (perhaps unsupported) is Mobil 1 is less likely to drain away or dry off. It seems to stay put pretty well, not as well as grease of course, but plenty well enough for my uses.

All the other blue-steel bits get wiped down with Hoppes, including the entire outside of the gun. Motor oil remains unpleasantly noticeable on the outside of a firearm, again because it seems to persist in a thicker layer over time.

JohnBT
July 7, 2013, 07:15 PM
"The link I provided is directly to Lubriplate and you can get a lifetime supply for what the syringes cost you."

I can't fit a 14-ounce can in my range bag.

The 3-pc kit price I linked appears to be at least as good a deal as the 1.75-ounce tubes on the Lubriplate site. Did you read Larry Vickers' comments on lubes based on his military experience?

redneck2
July 7, 2013, 07:37 PM
FWIW...I sell extreme duty industrial lubricants for a living. Food grade lubricants typically do not possess the extreme anti-wear properties (such as molybdenum) that non-food grade lubes have. FG lubes are made so that they can be consumed in a small quantity if some gets on a edible product. They have extremely limited EP additives.

I can't fit a 14-ounce can in my range bag.This would typically not be a aerosol or liquid can. 14 ounce is the standard for a grease cartridge that fits in a standard grease gun.

Oil is typically the preferred lubricant IF it will stay in place. Grease is simply solidified oil with some anti-wear additives added. The amount and type vary greatly depending upon the manufacturer. Moly is an exceptional EP (extreme pressure) additive, but is quite expensive per pound. Many manufacturers add little or no moly. Just because several greases are listed as "moly" also does mean that they are equal. Moly can be as little as 1/10th of 1% and still be listed. Our greases typically have 11%. That makes a world of difference.

Also, the amount of RO (rust and oxidation) additive can vary significantly within different oils. Hydraulic oils are typically either AW (anti-wear) or RO (rust and oxidation) blended. You never see an ad for WD-40 that touts their anti oxidation properties. They say "for anything that sticks or squeaks". I guess if your gun sticks or squeaks, that's fine. In 50+ years of shooting I can't remember one of my guns that sticks or squeaks.

Lubriplate was bought out (for the naming rights) by one of major manufacturers. I consider them one of the poorest lubes on the market currently.

I would look for something that has strong anti-wear characteristics and also R/O properties. For the typical person, CLP (cleans/lubricates/protects) comes to mind. I would assume this is most shooter's objective. Lubricate and retard oxidation (rust).

For me, I sell a PTFE teflon based product that has incredible anti-oxidation properties. AFAIK, PTFE has the lowest coefficient of friction of any product available. That's what I use.

YMMV

Potatohead
July 7, 2013, 07:43 PM
Thanks

Potatohead
July 7, 2013, 07:47 PM
I didn't post this as a thread so everyone could chime in with what they use. I posted it so those who read it might learn something. Then again, if you've been doing something for 50 years there is probably no sense in changing now.

Frog lube is quickly being found to be snake-oil with some properties that don't mix well with firearms as it doesn't provide adequate rust protection.
One can only learn when another chimes-

Ancient Chinese Proverb


.

HKGuns
July 7, 2013, 08:09 PM
Redneck, did you even read the article?

Tomcat47
July 7, 2013, 08:15 PM
I have used about everything mentioned here including Royal Purple and Lubriplate... I think all of it is generally good stuff for firearms including some of the regular stuff like hoppes etc.

Kano Kroil is a great product and price reflects it... I use it to clean my firearms with and it does a fantastic job. The Kano Company actually makes two great dry lubes for firearms as well "Dryphite" and "Molyfilm"

As far as lubrication on my firearms I prefer something that dries and leaves a non wet, non sticky lubrication that dust, powder etc. does not stick to.

Dri Slide Improved weapons Lube is prob my favorite, and then there is KG-10, Ballistol, Rem Dri-Lube that do great job as well.

There is a lot of good products out there actually... pick your poison!

Al Thompson
July 7, 2013, 08:39 PM
HKguns, that article has been discussed several times here over the years. It was published in 20011. ;)

car15bill
July 7, 2013, 08:40 PM
I'm with you on the kroil, nothing beats Kano stuff!!!

jack44
July 7, 2013, 08:40 PM
The BEST THING I FOUND IS ed red to clean to lube tranny fluid

grendelbane
July 7, 2013, 09:00 PM
I use what the designer and manufacturer recommended originally.

It is a very effective lubricant, and it is naturally sustainable.

It is sperm oil.

Of course, I haven't been able to get it the last few decades. In that case I substitute some thing else.

Usually CLP, but Dexron ATF mixed with canola works pretty well also, and is a lot cheaper. Dexron was formulated to be a synthetic mineral based sperm oil, and rapeseed oil, (of which canola is a variety), was originally used to lubricate steam engines.

Bill4282
July 7, 2013, 09:37 PM
If you can stand the flies, bacon grease.

taliv
July 7, 2013, 11:56 PM
i would not use kroil

jakk280rem
July 8, 2013, 12:26 AM
Gun-Slick graphite grease on revolver inards and clp on everything else.

Sam Cade
July 8, 2013, 01:39 AM
I use a mixture of Vagasil, beeswax and ground tiger baculum.

HoosierQ
July 8, 2013, 04:23 PM
I prefer Eezox over all else.

Rick
Well I don't care for EEZOX for lubrication but nothing beats it for rust prevention. For lube I use CLP, Remoil, or my own little concontion of Mobil 1 mixed with Marvel's Mystery Oil. Very slippery stuff. I use a little grease on rails too if it's handly. Just about any slippery oil will work, short term to lubricate a gun. For longer term lubrication AND protection from rust, the more expensive and fancy stuff comes in handy. If you wipe your gun down frequently and keep it dry, probably any oil will do the trick. The world is divided into two camps...WD-40 is just fine...WD-40 is terrible. I have found myself in both camps. I am splitting the difference and using it for all those millions of things folks us it for (I like it for conditioning a sharpening strop) but don't use it on guns or knives unless I am displacing water.

P5 Guy
July 8, 2013, 07:05 PM
i would not use kroil

I use Kano Kroil to clean powder and lead fouling. Penetrating oils are not lubricants. Mobile One and grease like EP2 are what I use to lubricate my firearms.

Riomouse911
July 9, 2013, 01:36 PM
It looks like we all have our favorites, and much like the Ford vs Chevy vs Dodge debates; they all seem to be working for those who bought them.

I've used 3 in 1, CLP, Rem-oil, Hoppes, Outers, on and on...and now I am using Slip 2000EWL. I read some reviews, bought a bottle, and so far it seems to be working as advertised.

The only "oil" I will not use is WD-40. I have seen firsthand how the stuff turns to yellowy glue over time in revolver innards. I'll pass.

None of my firearms have any rust or corrosion I can attribute to a "lack of protection" from the oil I used. A minumum of care and attention to your arms should prevent rust or corrosion from ever being an issue. (The only rust I can ever recall is from a P-226 being carrried for days on end in downpours and getting the gun and leather gear soaked through and through..and that was a Sig that went to Robar for Np3 shortly thereafter.)

All of these oils worked when I needed them to, and if the gun was properly lubed, it worked. (I have not, however, had to shoot one in -50 degree weather, maybe that'll be a difference maker someday) I bet Mobil 1, Lubriplate, Kroil etc would have worked just as well for me if those were on hand at the time.

if it works for you, and you have faith in it, use it. Nothing I or anyone else writes will ever change your mind.


Stay safe!

jimmyraythomason
July 9, 2013, 02:46 PM
WD-40 is my go-to for guns. No rust in over 45 years. I also use engine oil,wheel bearing grease and lithium. ATF too at times. I might even,in a pinch, use gun oil. I do have a dispenser of Progressive Product's gun wipes I bought for extenal wipe downs but find them to be TOO oily and very messy. WD-40 sprayed on an old tee shirt works great for this. The wipes are great for wiping down freshly blued guns and parts though.

Vonderek
July 9, 2013, 07:16 PM
I think there is too much ado about lubricants. If compared to a motor a gun cycles at a pretty low rate and there are lots of lubricants that will work fine. No need to buy the latest and greatest and pay big bucks for marketing. Lots of low priced options already mentioned that work fine.

floydster
July 9, 2013, 09:03 PM
I use plain old lard that we make on the farm, been using it for 60 years.
Use an old toe nail brush I got from my grand pappy to apply to the action and all.

evan price
July 10, 2013, 07:33 AM
Food grade?

Not planning on eating off of my guns anytime soon.

Mobil-One 0W20 synthetic oil works just fine for me. A little synthetic grease here and there as needed. Guns don't have high speed, high load moving parts. You could probably use bacon grease and be just fine, plus it would be food grade and smell great.

OilyPablo
July 10, 2013, 08:28 AM
I've been a sponsor on BITOG (Bob Is the Oil Guy) since 2001. I have a degree in chemistry and have been in the industry since 1982. I am NOT an old guy :neener: but I know a thing or two about lubricants. I found the article lightly written and easy to read. Knowing the constituents of ATF, I don't find it to be a great firearm lube nor oxidation preventative. It's basically in the same league as motor oil, only on the lighter side, with less AW additives, and yes some different additives. That said, there are some small engine oils with plenty of storage type oxidation preventative (vs in use heat stabilization type anti-oxidation additives), which may be useful with firearms IF you want to use motor oil on your guns. Frankly I DON'T like or use motor oils on my guns.

Indeed, use what you like and works for you. I do tend to change around a lot, so frankly I can't claim I've done some long term study with one lube in one application.

I don't use grease much but when I do, I use Amsoil synthetic spray grease - but Amsoil discontinued that product and came out with a replacement (I have not tried it yet because I have a case of the older stuff). I've tried heavier greases and most all #2 grease are WAY too heavy for firearm use, especially if cold and too much is used. I do use this light synthetic oil based grease on my semi-auto slides, but I use such a light amount it's barely visible. I do go a little heavier (slightly) when breaking in stainless-on-stainless only because I'm overly worried about galling (pure paranoia) but I've never had a problem.

For light oil I use Amsoil MP, and for medium oil I use corrosion-X. The only guns I purposely over oil a little bit are the AR's. I just think they are made to run a bit wet and I'm not dragging them through the sand. It makes clean up so easy.

For cleaning I recommend a 50/50 mix of Hoppe's 9 and Kroil.

Bikewer
July 10, 2013, 01:03 PM
I'm finding this kind of funny, but not for the reason you'd think. I've been using "Break Free" lubricants on my Glock for about 20 years... Because that's what the department supplies. Seems to work...

But what's amusing is that these very same kinds of threads take place... On bicycle forums.
Threads about chain lubes go on and on and on, with everyone pitching their particular favorite or their particular home-made brew.

Of course, bicycle chains live in a somewhat different environment than do firearms... But they are both exposed to the elements to some degree.

To those fond of motor oils, we point out that motor oils are forumulated to work in high-heat, sealed environments, heavily filtered. This does not apply to either guns or bicycles.... On bikes they not only attract crud but tend to get flung off.
Greases do not penetrate the internals of chain links, unless you heat the grease and immerse your chain... Doesn't apply to guns but greases also attract dirt rather badly.
Waxes are popular with cycists... they don't attract dirt but do tend to flake off. I don't know if anyone is using wax-based lubes for guns.
Silicone lubes have some followers but tests show rather low abrasion resistance.
There are numbers of modern, super lubes which combine petroleum products with teflon, molybedynum, and other chemicals which supposedly do everything all at once...

Let's face it, most firearms work pretty well with an absolute minimum of lubrication. I understand Inuits up in the Arctic use kerosene to avoid freezing.

Knightsofnee
July 10, 2013, 01:13 PM
50/50 Mobil 1 30w, Marvel Mystery Oil.

doubleh
July 11, 2013, 08:12 PM
Food grade? I've never felt the urge to try to eat one of my guns or even lick one of them for that matter so I'm not going to worry if my lube of choice is or isn't food grade.

I'm seriously considering switching to Preparation H for gun lube. It's greasy so it should furnish lubrication and it might shrink my groups. :D

Al Thompson
July 11, 2013, 09:59 PM
Based on the number of comedians we have, looks asked and answered....

:rolleyes:

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