Lee classic Turret press info needed


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horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 02:24 PM
Hello all I am looking into getting a lee classic turret press the 4 hole model any info is appreciated thanks horsemen61

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dab102999
July 9, 2013, 02:41 PM
will need to ask more specific questions to get good answers. If you do a search you will find lots of threads with this model involved.

Good press for the money. Will crank out way more then you will on a single stage. Can get close to progressive numbers if you stay with it. Can run as a single stage or can run one case from start to finish.

bds
July 9, 2013, 02:58 PM
Great press to do pistol and rifle cartridges at faster than single stage press.

You can set up dies and simply swap out turrets for easy and fast caliber changes without having to adjust dies.

Midsouth has the kit in stock for $186 - http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item.asp?sku=0000690304


What calibers are you looking to reload?

flipajig
July 9, 2013, 03:14 PM
They are a good press for the money. I have been loading on one for over 6 years with just two small issues. One there is a small square washer on the indexer that wore out the other was in the primer feeder there is a small spring in the head that broke both were easy fixes I now have spare parts on hand. Over all I'm very pleased with the press I load all my pistol ammo on it. With some pratice you should be able crank out 100 rds within 30 min or so.
As stated you can load as a single stage or with the turret I know I'm over 10K with mine.
Flip

horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 03:22 PM
mostly pistol guys I just purchased one and I have a question for those who use it do you like the powder measure that it uses?

horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 03:23 PM
When I say pistol I mean 380 9mm 40 45 45 COLT 38s 357s for now :evil:

9mmfan
July 9, 2013, 04:01 PM
I am just cutting my teeth, but have one. Insofar as the measure goes, I am using Unique for 255 SWC in .45 Colt , and at first the throws were pretty consistent, but then started throwing heavy.

I had run several throws through first to settle, and then did the "double tap" on the handle. I ended up throwing, weighing and adjusting the charge for each round.

As I am green at this, and going without a mentor, I don't see this as a bad thing right now. Keeps me going slow and paying attention.

In the future, I will probably try and make a dipper of some kind, but we shall see. Some folks get it to meter well, and I just might figure it out.

I like the press so far, for what it's worth, and think the versatility will come in handy once I get everything down a little bit better.

Feanaro
July 9, 2013, 04:17 PM
I got a Lee Classic Turret kit a few weeks back. It's my first press and I really like it so far. I picked it because I wanted to load pistol rounds, knew I would be too lazy to do it on a single station and I'm too cheap to buy a progressive press.

The auto-indexing is fast enough for my needs (100-250 pistol rounds loaded in a sitting) and it can be disabled when you first start, so you can load with the batch method. I love the convenience of the turret heads. I can move between .38 Special and .45ACP in under a minute - it would be 10 seconds but I'm too cheap to buy another Pro Auto Disk powder thrower. :evil:

The instructions kinda suck. I got more mileage out of watching YouTube videos on how to set one up. For example, I couldn't figure out for the life of me how to attach the bracket for the Safety Primer system until I looked up a few pictures of it. A certain degree of patience is required to get the hang of things like priming on the press, getting the Pro Auto Disk to throw powder correctly (or learning to settle for what it will throw instead of chasing what it won't) and so on.

Rule3
July 9, 2013, 04:22 PM
You did not say if you bought just the press or a kit???

The press is great, The Pro Auto disc powder measure is also very good.

The Lee Scale not so good. It works but is a pain to use. Ditch it and get a better scale.

A good scale (beam balance) is the most important reloading tool to own.

http://www.realguns.com/archives/122.htm

stubbicatt
July 9, 2013, 04:43 PM
The CCT is good for pistol and 223 class cartridges. I have broken turrets FL resizing 308 .mil cases in the CCT press, and would not recommend it for that purpose. Even if you don't break the turrets, you still have headspace issues where shoulder setback is inconsistent, due, I believe, to the tolerances in the turret to press fit.

It is a very good press. I like the "Safety Prime" system.

horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 04:47 PM
I purchased the press not the kit

RealGun
July 9, 2013, 05:00 PM
I really like my turret press, but I think touting the ease and speed of changeovers is exaggerated, in that one has to swap out the powder measure and recalibrate the charge. To speed that up, one would have to own a powder measure for every caliber (and load/turret). That is not really far fetched, since the Lee "Precision Auto Disk Powder Measure" (not the Pro) is certainly my preference and not very expensive.

When I change a turret, I am removing not only the powder measure but the accessories that go with it. There is the "riser", which allows the measure to stand taller than the other die stations, and the "swivel adapter", which allows the measure to be centered over the die cluster and not sweep the perimeter while the turret rotates. It then does not interfere with the primer assembly nor any flexlight, counters, or other gadgets attached to the press.

higgite
July 9, 2013, 05:00 PM
Go to youtube.com and search for "lee classic turret". You'll have hands-on information running out your ears. ;)

joecil
July 9, 2013, 05:10 PM
Actually RealGun I have a powder measure mounted on each set of dies in a turret most of which are the Lee Pro Powder measure however for my 45-70 I have a Lee Perfect Powder measure mounted on the powder through die. It takes about 1 minute to change calibers by changing turret, shell holder and primer size if needed. Load it with powder and ready to go. Now if you have to add a powder measure that would take about another minute at most as you just screw it into the extension on the die or leave the extension and powder measure as one piece.

RealGun
July 9, 2013, 05:38 PM
joecil - Now if you have to add a powder measure that would take about another minute at most as you just screw it into the extension on the die or leave the extension and powder measure as one piece.

You still have to calibrate a powder drop, if it's not dedicated to a turret.

PapaG
July 9, 2013, 05:54 PM
I have 7 other presses, two pro1000, one loadmaster (all three crap), two spar T's, an all American turret, and a Rockchucker. The turret is my go to when I need a box or two, or to load a few for a test. I have six turrets set up for 9mm, 38, 357, 45 apc and ar, and 45 colt. Three have their own powder measures. I like it. No gimmicks, I put the primers in manually.

RustyFN
July 9, 2013, 06:56 PM
mostly pistol guys I just purchased one and I have a question for those who use it do you like the powder measure that it uses?

I think it's a great press. I have been using one for around seven years. The powder measure works good. You are held to what the cavities will throw but they can be modified. From my experience the pro auto disk measure will throw consistent charges all day long. I load 9mm, 38/357 and 45 auto for pistol with Titegroup, Bullseye, HS-6 and WST and all of those powders throw very consistent.

Rule3
July 9, 2013, 08:18 PM
When changing calibers or changing bullet weight, I have all the dies in their own turret. Changing takes less than 5 minutes.

As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies.

1SOW
July 9, 2013, 09:37 PM
The Cast turret press is the best bang-for-the-buck out there. For pistol loaders who don't need over 250 rds/week it's ideal.

There is a learning curve, especially for powder drops and on-press priming. Once learned, they both run smoothly.

JMO based on experience with both types: The "Pro-Powder Disc system" is well worth the extra money for both the convenience and durability/reliability.

The Lee scale is very accurate, but eventually becomes irritatingly slow to set up. A 505 or Dillon OHaus beam scale will eventually be seen as a good investment.

A dedicated "light" is needed to shine into the empty cases and critical for both loader and pistol safety---mainly to VIEW EVERY POWDER DROP. Many versions are shown here on the forum.

Oh yes, the little square plastic ratchet. Once you resort to using the press correctly, the ratchet will last for 10K rds or more---it's 50 cents. At first, having a few might be a good $2.00 investment.;)

gspn
July 9, 2013, 11:58 PM
mostly pistol guys I just purchased one and I have a question for those who use it do you like the powder measure that it uses?

I've used that powder measure for .380, .38 spcl, .357, .41 mag, 10mm, 44 mag, 44 spcl, 45 colt, and tons of .45 ACP...it's a good piece of gear.

The powder measure i have is the one with the discs. Do I wish I could fine tune it a little better...yeah...but it's really not a big deal. I keep a notebook with load data so I know exactly which disc to use for a specific charge weight for each powder I use. (they provide a chart but it's always wrong...close in many cases...but wrong.)

oldreloader
July 10, 2013, 12:29 AM
I'm well satisfied with mine!

Lennyjoe
July 10, 2013, 12:39 AM
Mine has served me well. The indexer doesn't work so I turn manually. Would be nice to have extras like primer feeder, case and bullet feeders too but that stuff costs $$.

Quilbilly74
July 10, 2013, 12:50 AM
I just don't think you can really go wrong with the Lee classic. I just love mine. Didn't buy the kit though. Been using corn flake IMR-800x for powder so I have to hand weigh each charge but I don't mind. I just need a couple more four hole plates which are around $13 from Lee. Cheap enough for me!

rondog
July 10, 2013, 12:54 AM
I like mine.

under_dawg
July 10, 2013, 06:59 AM
I don't want to repeat the stuff above, but I have had the LCT for severl years and love it. I would add that I was hesitant to try try the Adjustable Charge Bar, but once I tried one, I bought an Adjustable Charge Bar for every turret. It really helps dial in your charge and you don't have to take the powder hopper off to change discks. I have the double disk kit as well, but wish I would have bought the charge bar from the get go. As far as the little square ratchet goes, always lower the handle (raise the ram above 1/2 way) when you are changing turrets or removing the indexing rod, and never short stroke (don't go half way and lower the ram again) and you will not have any problems with it. Make sure your rythem is consistant and the LCT will serve you well.

RandyP
July 10, 2013, 07:39 AM
Were it not for Lee and their affordable quality gear. any of us would not be able to afford this wonderful hobby of reloading. My LCT and Auito-Pro dispenser allow me to make 150-175 rounds per hour at a very leisurely pace.

My powder of choice is Win 231/HP-38 which meters very well using the disks, adjustable bar or the micro-disk. It is the only powder I use for 4 calibers so I made up my own chart using my $30 digital scale that lists what every hole in every disk throws with WEin 231. Once verified at each reloading session the charge weight does not vary by more than .1 grain.

CajunBass
July 10, 2013, 07:58 AM
I had one many years ago when they first came out. I certainly never saw much reason to think about another one. I got rid of it after several years when I got into tournament bass fishing but it was a good press.

Mine didn't have the powder measure attachment, I guess that came along later, but I tended to just use the little dipper that came with the dies for powder measuring. I had RCBS scales/measure/etc., but the dipper was fast, convient, and required no set-up, take down. I didn't have a permanent bench you see.

RealGun
July 10, 2013, 08:11 AM
As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies.

I don't have any particular need to debate this, but the argument about speed of powder drop changes, relying on the use of standard "auto disk" aperture numbers does not apply to those seeking more precision and using the Lee "adjustable charge bar" or another brand of precision powder measure. It seems to me, judging from discussions on various forums, that the desire for better than about +-.4 grains is pretty common, making it difficult to characterize changovers in simple terms. Of course, there is nothing to stop a person from owning a number of "adjustable charge bars", dedicated to a powder and weight.

Rule3
July 10, 2013, 11:41 AM
But by posting and quoting me you are debating:)

All I was saying was caliber/bullet, powder changes are very quick.

Your original post did not mention precision powder drops of =/- .4 grains,

You are not going to get that with the Lee Dics regardless.

You get what they drop. The charge bar is more trouble than it's worth JMO

rondog
July 10, 2013, 01:24 PM
As far as the little square ratchet goes, always lower the handle (raise the ram above 1/2 way) when you are changing turrets or removing the indexing rod, and never short stroke (don't go half way and lower the ram again) and you will not have any problems with it.

^THIS!^ I can't stress this enough! If you try to turn the turret with the ram all the way down, it WILL damage that little black plastic square ratchet thingy! Always raise the ram up at least halfway, and you'll be OK. Of course, if you choose to remove the drive shaft and index by hand or work single-stage, that's perfectly fine.

Just don't try to turn the turret by hand with the ram all the way down! Unhappiness will ensue.

RealGun
July 10, 2013, 02:28 PM
Rule3 - But by posting and quoting me you are debating

All I was saying was caliber/bullet, powder changes are very quick.

Your original post did not mention precision powder drops of =/- .4 grains,

You are not going to get that with the Lee Dics regardless.

You get what they drop. The charge bar is more trouble than it's worth JMO

Oh boy, here we go. Someone's annoyed.

My use of "calibration" certainly should imply that an adjustable charge bar might be involved. Changing disks is actually a little fussy. The powder charges should be rechecked, and the powder drop should be primed by discarding the first 10 drops and checking weights.

The +-.4 g part is referring to how close the disks allow you to get to the charge weight you had in mind. Only the "adjustable charge bar" or a different brand of powder measure allows you to get closer.

Rule3
July 10, 2013, 05:23 PM
I am in no way shape or form annoyed. You started the discussion with the quotes.

All I said was this:

"When changing calibers or changing bullet weight, I have all the dies in their own turret. Changing takes less than 5 minutes.

As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies. "

The end, done.

horsemen61
July 10, 2013, 05:43 PM
Ok guys I have been given a lot of info here and I am thinking about getting the lee pro disc powder measure as the charge bar does not sound like a good option in my mind any advice you all can give me would be appreciated thanks

RealGun
July 10, 2013, 05:47 PM
Rule3 - As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies.


Can't you allow that your comment might spawn the proviso that those using the adjustable charge bar for more explicit weights in their loads may find more time involved?

RustyFN
July 10, 2013, 06:03 PM
Quote:
Rule3 - As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies.


Can't you allow that your comment might spawn the proviso that those using the adjustable charge bar for more explicit weights in their loads may find more time involved?
__________________
RealGun

I can change calibers including powder charge and primer size in under five minutes. If you write the size cavity you used in the log book it is very fast to get back to that charge.

Lennyjoe
July 10, 2013, 06:16 PM
If you use the standard Lee Autodisc dispenser, the hoppers tend to crack after you take off/put on a few times to change the disc. I went with the upgrade kit for my dispensers and am much happier. Haven't tried the micro adjust yet, but have 2 sitting on the shelf.

Jump in, buy the press and roll away!

Potatohead
July 10, 2013, 06:18 PM
Threads like these are what makes it so hard to pick a press. Maybe they're just all good (well, maybe not). About the time that I get steered away from choosing one, I see a thread like this one saying how great said press is. Its just not easy to pick a press, lemme tell you-

RealGun
July 10, 2013, 06:30 PM
RustyFN - I can change calibers including powder charge and primer size in under five minutes. If you write the size cavity you used in the log book it is very fast to get back to that charge.

That's great, but it seems like no one understands that I am not referring to disks, except to say that the more specific load weights with the "adjustable charge bar" take more time. It's not a big deal, but it's more than a couple minutes to reset a reliable charge weight. I have never taken issue with how little time it takes when using disks.

Woolecox
July 10, 2013, 06:34 PM
Deleted

Woolecox
July 10, 2013, 06:35 PM
Ok guys I have been given a lot of info here and I am thinking about getting the lee pro disc powder measure as the charge bar does not sound like a good option in my mind any advice you all can give me would be appreciated thanks
NO! You are already getting the Lee Pro measure in the box I sent you today. It already has the micro bar installed which is light years ahead of using the disc. Take my word for it I have used both. You want the micro bar. The measure has the riser already attached too.

See the email I sent you before you buy anything.

Wooly

frankenstein406
July 10, 2013, 07:55 PM
NO! You are already getting the Lee Pro measure in the box I sent you today. It already has the micro bar installed which is light years ahead of using the disc. Take my word for it I have used both. You want the micro bar. The measure has the riser already attached too.

See the email I sent you before you buy anything.

Wooly
charge bar is only good with some powders, disks seem to work well with most. double disk kit is nice to have.

vont01
July 10, 2013, 08:33 PM
Bought Mine 12 years ago used. Had very little troub le over the years. Can run about 250 rds per hour with it. I load 9's , 380's, 357's 45acp's, 45 long colt's, 44 mag, 44 special, and probably some others that don't come to mind right n ow. Very content with it.

RustyFN
July 10, 2013, 09:36 PM
That's great, but it seems like no one understands that I am not referring to disks, except to say that the more specific load weights with the "adjustable charge bar" take more time. It's not a big deal, but it's more than a couple minutes to reset a reliable charge weight. I have never taken issue with how little time it takes when using disks.

You are right I misunderstood. You are correct the adjustable charge bar would take more time to adjust, just like the Dillon measure or any other measure that works like that.

Feanaro
July 10, 2013, 09:40 PM
When I change a turret, I am removing not only the powder measure but the accessories that go with it. There is the "riser", which allows the measure to stand taller than the other die stations, and the "swivel adapter"[...]

You realize you can unscrew all of those as a single unit? That's how I've always done it - unscrew the riser from the powder-through die and install in the next head.

Maybe they're just all good (well, maybe not).

As best as I can tell, there aren't any bad presses being made by the big companies. Some might not do what you want or how you want it but they aren't badly made.

Woolecox
July 10, 2013, 09:51 PM
charge bar is only good with some powders, disks seem to work well with most. double disk kit is nice to have.
I have had zero issues with the charge bar using 7 different powders. But if you really want the double disc kit, they can be had for a whopping 15 bucks. I am talking to you Chance, proud owner of a new Lee Classic Turret Kit.

Double Disc Set (http://leeprecision.com/double-disk-kit.html)

http://leeprecision.com/images/P/doublediskkit.jpg

Cheers,
Wooly

Rule3
July 11, 2013, 12:40 AM
Can't you allow that your comment might spawn the proviso that those using the adjustable charge bar for more explicit weights in their loads may find more time involved?

I said I was done but you continue and will not let it go, and write such an eloquent comment as:

"Can't you allow that your comment might spawn the proviso that those using the adjustable charge bar for more explicit weights in their loads may find more time involved?"

Certainly I can, but as mentioned it only works well with certain powders and the most important part, you never mentioned the charge bar in you initial post, so it is all after the fact..

I have the charge bar, the micro discs, the double disks a regular Forest Gump of Lee Discs. Yes, the charge bar takes some tweaking, regardless it is is still a none issue in changing over.

If I want to load minutia of powder I will use the RCBS and trickle. I weigh every rifle round on a balance beam scale.

Katitmail
July 11, 2013, 12:45 AM
Threads like these are what makes it so hard to pick a press. Maybe they're just all good (well, maybe not). About the time that I get steered away from choosing one, I see a thread like this one saying how great said press is. Its just not easy to pick a press, lemme tell you-
I think you know enough now. Just order it and use it. Reading more is just wasting your time and $$(shooting factory ammo) :)

bds
July 11, 2013, 01:00 AM
double disk kit is nice to have.
I have had zero issues with the charge bar using 7 different powders. But if you really want the double disc kit, they can be had for a whopping 15 bucks.
If you have the double disk kit, you can modify the slide tabs on the Adjustable Charge Bar by filing the slide tabs of one to double stack the charge bars and they will give you more powder charge adjustment options.

I metered up to around 47 grains of I4895/H4895/Varget and 48 grains of RL15 which are plenty for most popular .308 bullet weights and powder charges.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=181170&stc=1&d=1362931679

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=181171&d=1362931679

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 01:15 AM
Wooly I just want to say thanks man your a great guy to deal with awesome thank you for everything and I will give the charge bar a go thanks again

Lost Sheep
July 11, 2013, 01:22 AM
When changing calibers or changing bullet weight, I have all the dies in their own turret. Changing takes less than 5 minutes.

As to changing the Deluxe Powder disc, that takes a whole 1 minute more. I write down the disc used for every powder weight charge/powder I use. I write it on the box label. So there is no messing around trying to find the correct weight all over again, I keep dummy rounds labeled to set the seating dies.
Did you mean 5 minutes or 5 seconds?

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
July 11, 2013, 01:38 AM
Ok guys I have been given a lot of info here and I am thinking about getting the lee pro disc powder measure as the charge bar does not sound like a good option in my mind any advice you all can give me would be appreciated thanks
If you get a couple of extra disks with cavities slightly below the charge weight you desire, you can (very carefully) ream out a cavity to drop just the powder charge you want. It might be laborious, but worth it once it is done.

Be sure to indelibly mark the disk and the cavity as having been modified. Years from now you (if you forget), or whoever gets it after you will want to know. Shouldn't be necessary, as one should ALWAYS verify with a scale the amount of powder dropped by any powder measure.

Lost Sheep

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 02:28 AM
Thanks lost i will keep that in mind

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 03:59 AM
Can anyone answer me this why does no one make a metal little square ratchet bushing I think that is what that little plastic black Achilles heel is :banghead: :cuss: I mean even if lee offered it as a separate part I would buy it are there any machinist in the room who can answer me this would it be that hard to make?

dab102999
July 11, 2013, 05:54 AM
Can anyone answer me this why does no one make a metal little square ratchet bushing?

When things get bound up or out of alignment I would much rather have a 50 cent plastic piece break then get dies all messed up. Sometimes I think they designed this into the press. But on the same note I have loaded about 10,000 rounds or better on mine and have never broke one. purchased a bunch of extra when I got the press becuase everyone said they would break.

RealGun
July 11, 2013, 08:15 AM
Rule3 - you never mentioned the charge bar in you initial post, so it is all after the fact..

The only reason I know that you would consider that an important retort is if you are annoyed that anyone would comment on one of your posts or one of your replies. I explained it thoroughly enough, like an adult, and will now do my own withdrawal.

dickttx
July 11, 2013, 10:35 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsemen61 View Post
Can anyone answer me this why does no one make a metal little square ratchet bushing?

The same reason they put a fuse/breaker in your electric wiring.
I did not even have a concept of how the LCT worked when I bought mine about three years ago. I have no mechanical skills. I am still on the original thingy.

If I could have only one press it would be the LCT with the Safety Prime and Pro Auto Disk.

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 10:38 AM
That makes sense thanks guys

Nordeste
July 11, 2013, 10:41 AM
"Don't mention the rope in the house of the hangman" :D. There's a saying in my country that states that. I guess it's easy to understand and nothing gets lost in translation.

I own one. Got home last week. My reloading bench is on the way, too, but until I get my reloading permit (yes, we need that here, stupid European gun laws) I can't buy components and start reloading. And I'm biting my nails hard :D.

All I read and watched about it is good. Looks pretty solid and I think there's no better bang for the buck out there. I got the kit, and even the so much bashed Lee Scale doesn't seem that difficult to use to me.

My question is regarding brass. I have a good bunch of once fired 9 mm brass. Most of it is Magtech but there's some Fiocchi and S&B in between. I have cleaned it in the washing machine when my girlfriend wasn't watching :rolleyes: because I can't stand (and probably my neighbours wouldn't, too... I live in an apartment) the tumbler's noise. The results are good for me. They came out very clean. Dried them afterwards either in the sun or with a hair dryer. I know that, technically, Lee dies do not require lubrication, but with the kit there's a nice tube of lubricant, and I'm wondering whether it would be a good idea to lube those cases prior to resizing. Do you guys think it wouldn't hurt, or would you just skip that step and save the lubricant for the future?.

Rule3
July 11, 2013, 10:56 AM
Did you mean 5 minutes or 5 seconds?

Lost Sheep
I dare not say or I will be corrected.:) Never actually pput it on a stop watch but it is very easy and fast.

Lets go with 5 minutes. Take of Disc powder measure, remove turret, put on new turret with dies, screw in powder measure,put in correct disc, pour in powder. Done.

Please allow extra time to fiddle with adjusting charge bar to correct +/- ,4 grains of powder;)

dab102999
July 11, 2013, 10:57 AM
I know that, technically, Lee dies do not require lubrication, but with the kit there's a nice tube of lubricant, and I'm wondering whether it would be a good idea to lube those cases prior to resizing. Do you guys think it wouldn't hurt, or would you just skip that step and save the lubricant for the future?.

The lube is pretty much for rifle or necked cases. If you want to lube some handgun you can but I wouldn't do more them ever 20 or so cases. As far as a tumbler if you buy a better brand (Horandy) or the type that is a little more expensive you would be surprised how quiet these are. When I lived in a trailer all I had was a lyman tumbler and I would put it in a closet on a timmer to turn on in the middle of the night and it never bugged my family and that thing is noisy. I recently got a used Horandy and am really surprised how quiet that thing is. In a closet I don't think I could even hear it if I tried.

rondog
July 11, 2013, 12:07 PM
Can anyone answer me this why does no one make a metal little square ratchet bushing I think that is what that little plastic black Achilles heel is I mean even if lee offered it as a separate part I would buy it are there any machinist in the room who can answer me this would it be that hard to make?

That little plastic piece will last for years - as long as you DON'T try to turn the turret by hand with the ram all the way down! This has been mentioned several times, just don't do this and the ratchet will be fine. It will wear out eventually of course, this is why I bought 6 of them from Lee - to have some spares.

A metal one would be asking for trouble. It's plastic for a reason, so it will "give" and fail in the event of a bind-up instead of something else being damaged. Just like a fuse. And yes, it would be a tough (and expensive) part to make from metal.

Potatohead
July 11, 2013, 02:44 PM
I think you know enough now. Just order it and use it. Reading more is just wasting your time and $$(shooting factory ammo) :)
I think you're right

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 09:15 PM
Ok guys a lot of numbers have been thrown out there I would like to archive 100 loaded rounds an hour is this possible?

Lost Sheep
July 11, 2013, 09:59 PM
I dare not say or I will be corrected.:) Never actually pput it on a stop watch but it is very easy and fast.

Lets go with 5 minutes. Take of Disc powder measure, remove turret, put on new turret with dies, screw in powder measure,put in correct disc, pour in powder. Done.

Please allow extra time to fiddle with adjusting charge bar to correct +/- ,4 grains of powder;)
Ahhh... The ancillary activities.

I can change my turret with dies in about 5-10 seconds. But if you have to switch out your powder measure (that is, if you don't have a measure mounted on each setup) or even just swap disks and recalibrate for the powder drop, and the other little setup things you have to do, yeah, minutes.

I have not timed myself, but I can go from all my gear boxed and in storage to loading rounds in about 10 minutes, I expect. That includes staging my supplies, zeroing my scale and verifying my powder drops. And, yeah. probably 5-10 minutes from the last round of one chambering to dropping the first round of a different chambering. But simply swapping out the turret/dies is literally a few seconds.

Thanks for clarifying.

Lost Sheep

Lost Sheep
July 11, 2013, 10:03 PM
Ok guys a lot of numbers have been thrown out there I would like to archive 100 loaded rounds an hour is this possible?
The first time I ran any quantity through my brand-new Lee Classic Turret, I did 100 rounds in 47 minutes. That included replenshing the powder and primers, so no shortcuts there.

It did not include any setup, as I did that beforehand. Also, calibrating the powder measure was done beforehand and checking the powder drop only at the beginning and end of the run.

It did include boxing the finished product.

Thus, I could maintain 100 rounds per hour all day long if I wanted and give myself a 26 minute break every two hours.

And that was my first time out.

Lost Sheep

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 11:31 PM
Thanks Lost I was just curious

Rule3
July 12, 2013, 12:30 AM
Ahhh... The ancillary activities.

I can change my turret with dies in about 5-10 seconds. But if you have to switch out your powder measure (that is, if you don't have a measure mounted on each setup) or even just swap disks and recalibrate for the powder drop, and the other little setup things you have to do, yeah, minutes.

I have not timed myself, but I can go from all my gear boxed and in storage to loading rounds in about 10 minutes, I expect. That includes staging my supplies, zeroing my scale and verifying my powder drops. And, yeah. probably 5-10 minutes from the last round of one chambering to dropping the first round of a different chambering. But simply swapping out the turret/dies is literally a few seconds.

Thanks for clarifying.

Lost Sheep

Yes, just changing the turret to another caliber is pop it off and put on another 5 seconds or so.

Changing the powder measure over takes a bit longer. After unscrewing and putting it on another set of dies, fill with powder it is always good to throw some and weigh them to make sure all is correct using either the discs or charge bar. I still weigh every 10 or so after. Check seating depth and crimp measure OAL etc. Regardless it is still easy and fast. The whole reloading thing should not be a rush job.

As to rounds per hour, yes, a 100 is very doable at a relaxed pace. (this is priming on the press also) Even if you push it and go faster than you should you may get 125-150.

Nordeste
July 12, 2013, 06:09 AM
@dab102999;

Copy that, thank you ;).

In another thread I read that some guys mixed a bit of this LEE lubricant in alcohol or silicone spray when the cases were too clean. I'll first try without lubing, and if I find it too hard to resize I'll try that.

It's great that one can learn this much in this forum! :D

RandyP
July 12, 2013, 07:35 AM
Once I got familiar with the process running at 150-175 rounds per hour on my LCT is easy to do at my VERY relaxed pace.

One thing that kinda gets lost in a lot of these type discussions is that at least for me, reloading is a hobby, not a piece-work job - LOL. I am NOT in a 'hurry' to finish reloading, I took up the dog-gone hobby to fill my free time with an enjoyable activity. I don't fish 'fast' either - I have never timed how quickly I can change a lure or tie on a new snelled hook - lol

As to presses, they are IMHO all quite good and if you match your realistic ammo needs and budget with a machine you will be very happy and most all of them will last a lifetime. I often post that the great thing about reloading is that there IS a way for everyone on every budget to particpate, from the Lee $30 whack-a-mole Loader to the $30,000 Camdex and everything in between.

Rule3
July 12, 2013, 09:20 AM
@dab102999;

Copy that, thank you ;).

In another thread I read that some guys mixed a bit of this LEE lubricant in alcohol or silicone spray when the cases were too clean. I'll first try without lubing, and if I find it too hard to resize I'll try that.

It's great that one can learn this much in this forum! :D
I use the LEE lube mixed with 91% rubbing alcohol. Ratio of about 1 part lube to 10 parts alcohol. You need to shake it real well every time as it will seperate. Put it in a used small spray lube bottle and spritz the brass in a plastic tray. Does not take much, Makes rezing very smooth and easy even with carbide dies,

It's water soluble and does not need to be cleaned off, but if you want to use a damp cloth.

rondog
July 12, 2013, 11:50 AM
FWIW - I bought a big plastic tray that was meant for putting several potted houseplants on to catch the drainage. It's perfect for spreading out a LOT of cases of any kind so I can spray them. Another good lube is 1 oz. of pure lanolin, melted and mixed with 12oz. of isopropyl alcohol and put in a spray bottle.

horsemen61
July 13, 2013, 01:57 AM
Ok guys I have a question how does the micro charge bar work with the powder measure thanks guys

frankenstein406
July 13, 2013, 02:42 AM
Ok guys I have a question how does the micro charge bar work with the powder measure thanks guys
you just turn the brass knob, one way makes it smaller and the other bigger

horsemen61
July 13, 2013, 02:46 PM
ok thanks and it is just for fine tuning very small less than a grain amounts right

RealGun
July 13, 2013, 08:03 PM
Ok guys I have a question how does the micro charge bar work with the powder measure thanks guys

It replaces the auto disc and has an adjustable aperture, which works best at around 5 grains and up of the average pistol powder. You can adjust the aperture while the charge bar is mounted, so you can keep weighing sample charges until you get it dialed into about +-.1 gr. You need to do a follow up weight check after a few rounds, because the powder can cling to the parts and reduce the load. Today I wiped all the powder contact points with a used dryer sheet on a Qtip and had less clinging of powder.

Of course, you can always boost the charge to get back to the weight, then leaving some powder clinging to the aperture. It kind of stabilizes. It helps to drop 10 charges and pour them back, rechecking weights, before actually loading anything.

This is the currently available "adjustable charge bar". There is no "micro" available that I know of.

oldreloader
July 13, 2013, 08:55 PM
If you get a couple of extra disks with cavities slightly below the charge weight you desire, you can (very carefully) ream out a cavity to drop just the powder charge you want. It might be laborious, but worth it once it is done.

Be sure to indelibly mark the disk and the cavity as having been modified. Years from now you (if you forget), or whoever gets it after you will want to know. Shouldn't be necessary, as one should ALWAYS verify with a scale the amount of powder dropped by any powder measure.

Lost Sheep
Sharpie makes a silver marker that is great for marking those modified discs.

RandyP
July 14, 2013, 10:59 AM
I was fortunate enough to buy the Lee micro-disk set when it was available - works great for my .380 reloading.

Failing that - it will also work to buy an extra set of disks (or use the largest hole ones you don't use anyway) and fill the holes with JB weld. Once it cures you can drill them out to whatever size throws the load you seek, sand off any burrs till nice and flat and go for it. Start with smaller sized hole and work your way up of course.

If you don't have a large set of drill bits, a trip to Harbor Freight is in order for some inexpensive ones that will last a long time doing this chore.

dragon813gt
July 14, 2013, 12:34 PM
ok thanks and it is just for fine tuning very small less than a grain amounts right

Absolutely not. It works very poorly w/ small charges. This is why Lee put out a MicroDisk set. The reason the charge bar works poorly has to do w/ the opening in it. I know there are threads w/ pictures explaining why it doesn't work well w/ small charges and how to modify it. I have the charge bar and gave up. If the discs don't throw the load I want then I just use the Chargemaster and drop them in by hand. It adds next to no extra time doing it this way.


Brought to you by TapaTalk

RealGun
July 14, 2013, 01:27 PM
ok thanks and it is just for fine tuning very small less than a grain amounts right

It does get you decimal places closer, in between the yields of the available auto disks, but it does not do loads under 5.0 very well, if at all.

horsemen61
July 14, 2013, 11:19 PM
Thanks for the heads up guys

horsemen61
July 15, 2013, 05:30 PM
Alright guys troubleshooting time so I set up the press last night to do some 45 acps components as followed once fired Winchester brass I shot it cci large pistol primers accurate No.2 5 grains and Sierra. 452 jhp 230 grain bullets and the first one went just fine the three after that well I crushed the cases and I don't know why the case's were flared the bullet would sit in it any ideas on what I'm doing wrong :banghead:

dickttx
July 15, 2013, 05:43 PM
I did several of those when I first got my LCT. Most often I had short stroked and the turret was not all the way to the next die. Operator error.:)
I keep those on my bench as a reminder to watch what I am doing.

horsemen61
July 16, 2013, 01:42 AM
So you think I am short stroking it?

frankenstein406
July 16, 2013, 03:15 AM
is the case centered with the die? trying turning the turret slightly by hand and does it "pop" into place?

horsemen61
July 16, 2013, 10:55 AM
Yes the turret is centered with the die and yes it does lock into place

RealGun
July 16, 2013, 11:12 AM
That happened to me when I tried to run a flared case into the sizing die. So be careful what you do with cases left from doing the setup.

horsemen61
July 16, 2013, 11:38 AM
I tried again today and yes I went all the way up when I went to flare still crushing them anymore ideas

Rule3
July 16, 2013, 12:37 PM
If it is crushing on the flare stage you die is screwed in too deep. Are you using the Pro auto disc powder drop on this die at the same time?? The Power drop insert also pushes down inside and will flare the case rather than the little powder through fitting that come on the die.

If you have the LEE manual go to page 74.

If not:
#3
http://leeprecision.com/cgi-data/instruct/Pistol4.pdf

Rule3
July 16, 2013, 01:03 PM
Did you take the dies apart to clean them when you got them?? If so be sure the sizer insert is in correctly. Tapered end DOWN,

If you have the powder sic on the die, take it off. Screw in the orginal powder adaptor.

Now loosen the lock ring, screw the die in until it hits the shell holder (with the ram all the way UP.(hold the handle)

Now turn the whole die back (loosen) it one FULL turn.

Hand tight the ring do not move the die body. Try to flare a case. Iy should barely flare it. Turn the whole die just a bit more untill the bullet just barely starts, That's it tighten lock ring.

If you use the Powder disc take out the little top funnel thing and screw in the powder disc extension and hopper.

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g251/Hobster_2006/DSC03059Medium.jpg (http://s58.photobucket.com/user/Hobster_2006/media/DSC03059Medium.jpg.html)

horsemen61
July 16, 2013, 04:42 PM
Alright guys ill give that a go thanks also while I am thinking about it does anybody know we're I can purchase the micro disk kit lee discontuined it so I'm looking to find a used one I guess.

horsemen61
July 16, 2013, 04:53 PM
I can't believe it 90 posts I just got the thing 4 days ago thanks guys for all the replies I really appreciated it :D

joecil
July 16, 2013, 06:18 PM
You are about a 1/2 a day late on a Micro Disk as I just sent one to Ranch Dog an hour ago. You might check ebay but can be a bit pricey. I bought one to try and never found a need for it as I load 9mm, 45 ACP, 45 Colt and larger. Every thing I load takes more than it would load.

Lost Sheep
July 16, 2013, 10:47 PM
I tried again today and yes I went all the way up when I went to flare still crushing them anymore ideas
Got pictures? I think they would help.

Is the crushing taking place in the flaring die? All the way up? Or partway up? On entry?

I am having a hard time picturing the problem and the sequence of events. Thanks

Lost Sheep

horsemen61
July 17, 2013, 01:07 AM
The crushing is happening when I try to seat the bullet guys and ill get pics when I can

TheCracker
July 17, 2013, 01:10 AM
There is so much info online about it it should be simple to find anything you would need to know. YouTube is great!

Lost Sheep
July 17, 2013, 03:33 AM
The crushing is happening when I try to seat the bullet guys and ill get pics when I can
OK, thanks. That gives me something to go on.

Most common cause of crushing a case when seating is the mouth of the case is catching on or digging into the bullet, usually because of insufficient bell of the case mouth or not chamfering the case mouth (a burr or sharp edge is catching the bullet).

Less likely is a bullet is just to tight to slip into the case. Might be a little oversized or the case is still too tight.

I might be able to refine my thoughts more when you are able to send a picture.

Lost Sheep

RealGun
July 17, 2013, 07:24 AM
I wonder if the PTX is jammed in the down position. It is supposed to float inside the die and would fall out if the die was off and turned upside down. These dies work better if drenched with One Shot or other solvent before use. One Shot (Hornady) doesn't foul the powder.

horsemen61
July 17, 2013, 05:31 PM
Ok guys thanks again for the heads up I will put the pics up when I can

Rule3
July 17, 2013, 07:50 PM
The crushing is happening when I try to seat the bullet guys and ill get pics when I can
First I thought you said it was crushing when sizing?? Which is what I replied to.

If is crushing on seating then first:

Does the bullet start or stay in the case if ypu place one on the SIZED case?? If not then you need to flare a little more (the flaring die)

Again are you using the 3 dies or the 4 dies with the Factory crimp?

If the bullet fits in the flared case and then crushes as you try to seat, the seating die is in too far and is crimping it to much. Loosen the die all the way out, loosen the seating knob on top out until you see threads. Now go to page 75 of the LEE manual as it is explained much better then the instructions that come with the dies.


Mail me the dies and turret, I will set them up for you:);)

horsemen61
July 17, 2013, 10:21 PM
Sorry I should have been more clear with what I was saying I will adjust accordingly and post my findings thank you all

Woolecox
July 18, 2013, 09:41 AM
Sorry I should have been more clear with what I was saying I will adjust accordingly and post my findings thank you all
When I was using that press, I sat each of the dies up for each station according to the instructions in the box. I set the press up according to the instructions in the box.

I then manually indexed the press and dumped powder charges manually until I got the hang of it. Then I carefully set the Lee Pro Powder measure up according to the instructions in the box.

After that, I ran it with "auto indexing". If you are not making smooth full strokes, the turret can stop in between stations and you will have a crash. When that little square indexing bushing wears a little, this will happen a lot.

I fully understand that Lee's instructions are not the most thorough in the world but they should answer 98% of you set up instructions. If you are crushing cases in the seating operation it can only be from a couple different causes:

- turret not aligned with die
- not enough flare/bell in case mouth
- grossly misadjusted seating die
- kids hamster is stuck in die

Turret presses and progressives are not ideal in which to learn this hobby. It has and can be done with perseverance.

Keep us posted,
Wooly

Rule3
July 18, 2013, 10:09 AM
- kids hamster is stuck in die


Keep us posted,
Wooly


:D:D:D You owe me a new keyboard due to coffee damage!:D:D:D

rondog
July 18, 2013, 03:20 PM
Just thought I'd toss this in here.....

This is a Lee Powder Through Expander for a pistol round. The part that bells open the case mouth is a very tiny bevel, or taper, right in front of the big shoulder. It's very hard to see with the eye, but you can measure it with a caliper. You can see that it will only open a case mouth just a little, but it's enough. Once the case hits the end of that taper/bevel it contacts the shoulder and pushes up on the Expander, which operates the Powder Measure to dump.

The front part of the Expander is just a tad smaller than the ID of the cases, and acts like a "pilot" to guide it in. Lee customer service told me once that the surface is rough for two reasons, to act like a file to slightly "deburr" the case mouths and to also cause the cases to "grab" on the downstroke to help jar the Powder Measure and shake the powder out.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/ammo%20and%20reloading/Leeexpanderplug.jpg

RandyP
July 18, 2013, 03:52 PM
You owe it to yourself to check out the GREAT Lee self-help videos that clearly show the correct way to set up their dies and machines - I agree that their printed instructions leave a lot to be desired - lol

Here is a direct link to the vids:

http://leeprecision.com/help-videos.html

You want to watch both the turret press AND the single stage die setup videos.

Hope this helps -if I have been away from the press for while I will always double check any setup changes by watching the videos.

horsemen61
July 18, 2013, 05:42 PM
Thank you all for all the help. Now I am no longer crushing the brass but in my 45 colt dies I am putting scratches on it :banghead: I think there might be a burr in the die I have taken it apart cleaned it as best I could I will try a few more if it doesn't stop its off to lee :mad: so I hope I can fix it

horsemen61
July 21, 2013, 03:13 PM
Ok guys here are those pics I promised

horsemen61
July 21, 2013, 03:14 PM
Here is another one

horsemen61
July 21, 2013, 03:15 PM
So any ideas as to why this is happening

dickttx
July 21, 2013, 03:45 PM
Your dies are not installed correctly.
I would remove all the dies from the turret and remove the auto advance rod. Then, starting with the sizing die make sure that each die works correctly before installing the next. When I got my LCT about three years ago I was a 73 year old fumble fingered CPA and a mechanical midget (I still am). I had no concept of how the LCT worked as my prior experience had been 40 years before with a single stage press. It did not take long for me to have it working as a single stage. After some experience I added the Safety Prime and the Pro Auto Disk. Then later I put the auto advance rod back in.
It is a tremendous system. The key to the system is the great expander/flare/powder through die. Three operations with one press of the handle.
Get out your instructions and start over.

RealGun
July 21, 2013, 07:10 PM
Sure looks to me like a tight crimp before the bullet is seated. I believe I can see a roll crimp, which should not be there in any case.

I've done this myself on a Lee Pro1000, on which I was forced to insert and crimp at the same station.

I think you should reinstall this die, being very careful to follow the instructions to the letter.

Woolecox
July 21, 2013, 09:44 PM
Just so we are clear, where again are you getting the crushed case?

Station one: Size/De-prime/Re-prime
Station two: Bell mouth/Drop powder
Station three: Seat bullet
Station four: Taper crimp case

Like stated above, those cases look like they were roll crimped BEFORE the bullet was seated. So which station is this happening?

a1rstreamer
July 22, 2013, 09:53 AM
I started out a couple of months ago with a Lee turret kit. I found that some of my loads didn't fire (squibs), mainly because the primers were not well seated. That and the action of the turret gave me cause to reconsider how I was going to do my reloading. After consulting with some guys on one of the other reloading boards and watching some of the videos, I decided to try the Lee breech lock hand press - I already had all the dies I needed for 9mm. I also got a Lee perfect powder dispenser (I wasn't totally happy with the auto-disk. So here's my conclusions for what it's worth:

The hand press allows me to see exactly what the status is at each stage with each cartridge I am loading. I can see that the primers are properly seated, and I can see that the powder charge went into the cartridge. I no longer have squibs.

One thing I did notice was that if I didn't carefully align the cartridge in the shell holder when I seated the bullet or did the final crimp, the press would bind a bit ( be harder to close) and that is when I would notice that I had a ding in the side of the brass. So the ding or crushed casing you are showing was the result of the the cartridge not being properly placed in the shell holder. This may have been caused in your case as the turret moves.

I found that the auto disk powder measure would sometimes bind and bits of powder would drop out. The perfect powder measure has a rotary action which is smoother. As well, I use a digital scale to weigh the powder charge when I'm setting up for a batch. I will run several powder throws on the scale until I have the desired weight repeated. It is much easier to change the amount of powder thrown with the perfect measure that with an auto disk. I load 9mm, some with a 124gr bullet and some with a 115 gr bullet. The powder charge is different for each. I'm currently using Hornady HS-6 (that's what I was able to get locally) and I set it at 6.6 gr for 124 gr FMJ bullet and 6.8 gr for a 115 gr FMJ bullet.

I agree that the Lee scale could use improvement as it is difficult to read. I am using a digital scale which I find much better.

As for speed - no one mentions the time spent on case preparation, but it is very important and can be very time consuming. I decap and clean my cases before I start reloading. I have used both the vibratory and ultrasonic cleaning methods - my vote goes to the ultrasonic. When I used the vibratory method, I spent 6 hours picking the corn cob media out of the primer pockets on a batch of 300. I reload in batches of 50, and it takes me a bit more than an hour. I have ordered some breech lock bushings with the lock screw on them, so that I can set up each die and then the switchover will save me the time I now spend on making sure that they are all adjusted. That would bring my time down to 1 hour for 50 rounds - which is just fine for me.

horsemen61
July 22, 2013, 06:14 PM
Wooly to answer your question I do steps 1-3 in that order I do not have a fcd so I guess I am crimping while seating could that be my problem?

Woolecox
July 22, 2013, 06:35 PM
Yes sir it could. The adjustment has to be precise on that type die. Here is the way I do it:

1. Adjust the die high so it is not crimping at all but will let the bullet seater touch the bullet.
2. Adjust the seater until you get the desired OAL.
3. Now back the seater stem WAY out (or even take it out).
4. Run the same case into the die and screw the crimp body down until you feel it contact the case. Keep doing this until you get the proper amount of crimp. For a Auto, just enough to where the cartridge drops freely into a case gage or your chamber. For a revolver, just enough to roll the edge into the cannelure. Either operation is a precise adjustment.
5. Now, with your seater/crimp die locked down, run the same cartridge you just seated and crimped back up into the die and put your seater plug back in.
6. Run the seater back down until you feel it touch the bullet of your properly sized and crimped round. Run a few and fine tune the OAL.

There may be other or better ways to do it but this has always worked best for me. It sounds harder than it really is in practice.

When you can, invest in a good set Lee Carbide 4 die set. So much easier and I think they produce a better round. The 4th die in that set is not a FCD. It is a special taper crimp die for auto pistol rounds.

Feel free to call next time you are at your bench if you need help. We have to get you up and running!

Wooly

Woolecox
July 22, 2013, 07:15 PM
One thing I did notice was that if I didn't carefully align the cartridge in the shell holder when I seated the bullet or did the final crimp, the press would bind a bit ( be harder to close) and that is when I would notice that I had a ding in the side of the brass. So the ding or crushed casing you are showing was the result of the the cartridge not being properly placed in the shell holder. This may have been caused in your case as the turret moves.

....no one mentions the time spent on case preparation, but it is very important and can be very time consuming. I decap and clean my cases before I start reloading. I have used both the vibratory and ultrasonic cleaning methods - my vote goes to the ultrasonic. When I used the vibratory method, I spent 6 hours picking the corn cob media out of the primer pockets on a batch of 300.

Airstreamer,

Congrats! You have mastered the LCT Press in a short period of time. I will take a gentlemanly disagreement to a couple of the thing you mentioned.

In that first paragraph, the only way bullet alignment can cause case crush is if the base of the bullet is over the case mouth (sideways) and you try to seat it. More than likely crushing is due to not enough bell. Or, using one of those seat/crimp dies that is mal-adjusted. Sure you should align the bullet as straight as possible but a slight cant should not crush the case.

As far as pistol case prep.... It is not necessary to de-cap and clean primer pockets before tumbling. Unless,,,,,, you are shooting 50 yard matches for score. Then you need to clean and uniform the primer pockets, de-bur flash holes, trim to uniform length, weigh each case, bullet, powder charge, and get yourself a custom pistol, etc. Pretty much the same as you would prep match rifle ammo (with the exception of neck turning of course).

Or unless you really just enjoy prepping brass. Sure! Go ahead. But I have found absolutely no difference in accuracy or reliability for fast action pistol shooting with carefully cleaned and prepped cases and this:

Pour dirty cases into Thumbler Vibe case cleaner (primers in) with some corn cob or walnut media and a spoonful of magic potion, run for 4 hours, come back and separate cases from media, run through Dillon 550, head to range or match.

I have not even found any difference in this method as apposed to brand new cases. And, you don't have to pick media out of primer pockets. That is the way everyone at my range/league does (and how they taught me) it and it works great.

Again, not trying to be ornery or contrary but just sharing what has worked or me (us). Heck I had rather be shooting than reloading any day!

Cheers,
Wooly

horsemen61
July 23, 2013, 07:33 AM
Thankks wooly ill give it a go today and let you know

Potatohead
July 23, 2013, 01:48 PM
Just thought I'd toss this in here.....

This is a Lee Powder Through Expander for a pistol round. The part that bells open the case mouth is a very tiny bevel, or taper, right in front of the big shoulder. It's very hard to see with the eye, but you can measure it with a caliper. You can see that it will only open a case mouth just a little, but it's enough. Once the case hits the end of that taper/bevel it contacts the shoulder and pushes up on the Expander, which operates the Powder Measure to dump.

The front part of the Expander is just a tad smaller than the ID of the cases, and acts like a "pilot" to guide it in. Lee customer service told me once that the surface is rough for two reasons, to act like a file to slightly "deburr" the case mouths and to also cause the cases to "grab" on the downstroke to help jar the Powder Measure and shake the powder out.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/ammo%20and%20reloading/Leeexpanderplug.jpg
Good post Rondog. Thanks

Potatohead
July 23, 2013, 01:51 PM
If you are not making smooth full strokes, the turret can stop in between stations and you will have a crash

How important is the stroke in reloading? Is that an art in itself or not that big a deal as long as your smooth and complete with it?

Beentown
July 23, 2013, 10:26 PM
I stop in the middle of my stroke all the time and start again. No issue except it slows you down.

Woolecox
July 23, 2013, 10:36 PM
I stop in the middle of my stroke all the time and start again. No issue except it slows you down.
If you are using the Auto Powder measure, you could possibly overcharge or double charge a case. This could happen (I have done it several times) with any turret or progressive press.

The best practice is a full stroke then index. Why would you do it any other way?

frankenstein406
July 24, 2013, 01:59 AM
Thank you all for all the help. Now I am no longer crushing the brass but in my 45 colt dies I am putting scratches on it :banghead: I think there might be a burr in the die I have taken it apart cleaned it as best I could I will try a few more if it doesn't stop its off to lee :mad: so I hope I can fix it
I had to take one of my dies apart and some 800 grit sand paper took care of it.

Lost Sheep
July 25, 2013, 01:50 AM
It's a machine. It does what you make it do. You are in charge.

It is up to you to design your production method that is safe, sure, efficient and one you can live with (or die with). You CAN design a half-stroke into your algorithm if you want. Perfectly OK. If you want to double-stroke the powder drop, go for it.

Recognize the risks. Be prepared for the consequences if you make a mistake. Design effective Quality Contro (QC) measures and use them.

For myself, I try to keep things simple. I have found it helpful to chant a mantra when loading to keep the steps ALWAYS in proper order.

Be safe. Always, All Ways.

Lost Sheep

edit: re: QC. Like spelling "Control"

horsemen61
July 25, 2013, 02:48 AM
As always guys great advice :D

a1rstreamer
July 26, 2013, 12:57 PM
Thanks for the pointers Wooly - I'm still learning, so any constructive feedback is always appreciated.

I may not have mentioned it, but I have a major space constraint. That is another reason why I converted over to the Lee Hand Press. I've got the entire bench (except consumables) in a toolbox.

Before I had the vibratory cleaner, I had acquired an ultrasonic one. I used that to clean my last batch of brass - 2 10-minute cycles and it was nice and clean inside and out. It also takes up much less space than the vibratory one.

One thing I did was to replace the lock rings on the die set with the bushing that has a split clamp. That way, when I swap the dies in at each stage I don't have to worry that they have to be adjusted. I've done a couple of batches and the time saving for that is worth the price (2 for $15).

Woolecox
July 26, 2013, 05:03 PM
Thanks for the pointers Wooly - I'm still learning, so any constructive feedback is always appreciated.

One thing I did was to replace the lock rings on the die set with the bushing that has a split clamp. That way, when I swap the dies in at each stage I don't have to worry that they have to be adjusted. I've done a couple of batches and the time saving for that is worth the price (2 for $15).

That's great man! Sounds like you are doing well. Most things are just a matter of preference. Some are cold hard facts.

I think you are using the Turret Press right? Do you have space for a couple of these:
http://leeprecision.com/images/P/4holeturret.jpg
Once you get these set up, you never have to adjust the dies again.

Cheers,
Wooly

horsemen61
August 9, 2013, 01:26 AM
Update I still am manully indexing the LCT press but as of now I am turning out first rate ammo at a higher speed than ever before so thanks all for the help

Woolecox
August 9, 2013, 09:23 AM
That's awesome! Glad you got it figured out.

Wooly

horsemen61
August 9, 2013, 02:01 PM
Thanks wooly

horsemen61
August 9, 2013, 04:24 PM
I do have to say I am learning to love this press.

horsemen61
August 12, 2013, 11:02 PM
Another update I really like the fact that I can see the spent primers as they fall through the ram this was a bit of a concern for me. I used to prime in a separate hand priming tool.

tiklikker
August 13, 2013, 02:12 PM
Here's a tip if you have to remove the turret once it's all set up. Keep a one pound empty coffee can handy at your bench, and place the turret with dies and Pro Powder Measure inside. Keeps everything from falling over. Better to store the turrets with dies in the Lee Red Turret die case. I have one for each set of dies I load often, but the coffee can would do ok there too.

joecil
August 13, 2013, 05:52 PM
Here is the way I store my Turrets and powder measures. I use 3" ID PVC pipe cut and 1.5" to 2" sections. A 24" of the PVC is pretty cheap and easy to cut.

horsemen61
August 14, 2013, 02:51 AM
Great idea joe I will try that thanks.

horsemen61
August 14, 2013, 05:33 PM
Alright guys question time how do you get the primers in the little round primer attachment because I hate playing primer pick up :cuss:.

horsemen61
August 14, 2013, 09:37 PM
Any ideas

Katitmail
August 14, 2013, 09:44 PM
Annoying, isn't it? Sometimes you feel like you got it under control and later it does it again. Primer on a floor..

Last couple hundred rounds I reloaded I manually put primers on arm.

Beretta96
August 14, 2013, 10:01 PM
Alright guys question time how do you get the primers in the little round primer attachment because I hate playing primer pick up :cuss:.

Most times I just invert the primers under the round priming container. Sometimes I'll do it inside of a sandwich bag so they don't bounce everywhere.

Lost Sheep
August 15, 2013, 12:23 AM
Alright guys question time how do you get the primers in the little round primer attachment because I hate playing primer pick up :cuss:.
Depends on how the primers are packaged from the manufacturer.

Most primers are in a square, flat plastic molded container inside a plastic cardboard sleeve. If you invert the container over a flat surface (table, sheet of paper or the round to which you referred) the primers can be placed right there. Pull the sleeve partway off the flat, you can dump 10, 20, 30 (or any multiple of 10) primers.

The round attachment is also a primer flipper. Shake it in a gentle, circular motion and all the primers will be flipped open-side up.

Alternatively, you could just dump the primers into a bowl or your palm and pour them into the primer flipper/round attachment before flipping.

Good luck.

Lost Sheep

horsemen61
August 15, 2013, 12:55 AM
Thanks guys for the advice

horsemen61
September 9, 2013, 06:32 PM
Alright guys I am beginning to load the dreaded 223 for an armalite rifle 15 any advice for doing this on the LCT

Thanks horsemen61

Woolecox
September 9, 2013, 09:10 PM
Alright guys I am beginning to load the dreaded 223 for an armalite rifle 15 any advice for doing this on the LCT

Thanks horsemen61
I loaded some on that press. I did not use the onboard powder measure but threw my charges on a Harrell and then dropped them through the funnel. You just have to make sure the ram is up when you do that or you will drop powder all over everything.

Otherwise it worked great.

Potatohead
September 9, 2013, 09:18 PM
Alright guys question time how do you get the primers in the little round primer attachment because I hate playing primer pick up :cuss:.
I passed on the LCT primer unit and do it off press with a rcbs handheld. I love using this little thing. That didnt really answer your question though :(

Rule3
September 10, 2013, 01:18 AM
If I understand your question, is it getting the primers out of the 100 pack sleeve into the round primer tray??

Slide the top cardboard over until 50 primers are visible. Put the empty tray over the top of the primer pack and and flip it over. Now there are 50 in the tray. put the tray on a flat bench on a towel or something(in case some fall out) and slowly slide the top sleeve off as 10 primers at a time drop in the tray. Sound s more complicated than it is. Jiggle them so they are all flipped the right way.Takes 10 seconds or so.

Or if you can live with just 50 primers, use those and then do the same thing over. Doing it over the towel saves you picking up primers from the floor !

Lost Sheep
September 11, 2013, 12:48 AM
If I understand your question, is it getting the primers out of the 100 pack sleeve into the round primer tray??

Slide the top cardboard over until 50 primers are visible. Put the empty tray over the top of the primer pack and and flip it over. Now there are 50 in the tray. put the tray on a flat bench on a towel or something(in case some fall out) and slowly slide the top sleeve off as 10 primers at a time drop in the tray. Sound s more complicated than it is. Jiggle them so they are all flipped the right way.Takes 10 seconds or so.

Or if you can live with just 50 primers, use those and then do the same thing over. Doing it over the towel saves you picking up primers from the floor !
Dump the whole 100 primers into a paper plate or a paper towel, then funnel them onto the flipper tray. Easy.

Lost Sheep

dickttx
September 11, 2013, 11:34 AM
Even simpler, turn the primer package upside down on the tray, then slide the cover off.

Potatohead
September 11, 2013, 04:24 PM
Even simpler, turn the primer package upside down on the tray, then slide the cover off.
^^^Thats my choice. Simple as pie...

Lost Sheep
September 12, 2013, 01:00 AM
Even simpler, turn the primer package upside down on the tray, then slide the cover off.
That works fine unless you are using Federal primers. Their tray is larger than most primer flipper trays except Lee's new one. There must be hundreds of thousands of the old round trays too small for the larger primer sleeves (and they don't wear out or age out), so the question remains, "how to handle it when things don't fit?"

Lost Sheep

RealGun
September 12, 2013, 11:28 AM
dickttx -Even simpler, turn the primer package upside down on the tray, then slide the cover off.

Lost Sheep - That works fine unless you are using Federal primers. Their tray is larger than most primer flipper trays except Lee's new one. There must be hundreds of thousands of the old round trays too small for the larger primer sleeves (and they don't wear out or age out), so the question remains, "how to handle it when things don't fit?"

Half a box will fit a Lee tray, so I slide the lid half off, dump that, then slide the lid in the other direction and dump that. Their box does well when loading tubes directly from the box.

Potatohead
September 12, 2013, 12:18 PM
Ahh. I've only used CCI primers.

dickttx
September 12, 2013, 01:04 PM
Half a box will fit a Lee tray, so I slide the lid half off, dump that, then slide the lid in the other direction and dump that. Their box does well when loading tubes directly from the box.
Couldn't have said it better.
And I only use CCI too.

Lost Sheep
September 13, 2013, 02:31 AM
Take a paper towel, punch it into a bowl shape in your palm and shape a "spout" at one point on the circumference. Dump 100 primers into the paper towel and pour the primers into the primer flipper tray. Flip the primer upright in the usual way and install the flipper tray cover any you are good to go.

Alternative: take a flat piece of cardboard. Put the primer container on the cardboard and pull the sleeve. Lift the primer tray up. This leaves all the primers (except CCI sleeves) all face down on the cardboard. Corral all the primers into a small circle, put the cover for the primer flipper tray over the primers, pick the whole assembly up and flip over. Remove the cardboard, exposing all the primers (cup bottoms showing) and install the flipper tray bottom. With the flipper tray top and bottom thus assembled, all the primers facing the right direction you are all set. If any few primers are upside down you can fix that with the flipper tray in the usual way.

How is such a simple thing occupying such bandwidth? Every suggestion posted here will work just fine.

Lost Sheep

horsemen61
October 21, 2013, 01:05 PM
Update so far I have loaded up quite a bit of pistol ammo on the LCT and I really am liking it I still drop powder from a separate stand alone lee perfect powder measure. My time has been cut down by a large margin and no I am not rushing I check the powder on the 10th one every ten so I am happy next challenge 6.8 spc thanks for all the help guys

horsemen61
November 22, 2013, 02:30 PM
Ok guys looking at a thread done by bds about the lee pro1000 lets make this one all about how to trouble shoot the LCT thanks guys for the help

Lost Sheep
November 23, 2013, 02:17 AM
Ok guys looking at a thread done by bds about the lee pro1000 lets make this one all about how to trouble shoot the LCT thanks guys for the help
1) This thread is 7 pages already. A thread like the one you mention of how to trouble shoot the Lee Classic Turret (or the Lee Deluxe Turret, operationally identical almost) would be better off starting fresh? I think.

2) I switched from my Lee Pro-1000 presses to a single Lee Classic Turret. The Lee Turrets seem to need a whole lot LESS trouble-shooting.

There is the auto-advance indexing adjustment (which has given me no trouble at all, though I have heard of others), the primer arm dragging on the shell holder and (the big one) the primer dispensing device adjustment being finicky. So, a trouble shooting thread might be nice to collect all the cures.

Then there are the improvements (completed cartridge kicker, for one).

Good thought, horsemen61

Lost Sheep

1SOW
November 23, 2013, 02:39 AM
I agree with Lost Sheep about compiling the items of interest in a new organized thread.

My biggest irritant has been having to slightly bump the 9mm case back into the shell holder well over 1000 times per month when it jostles forward a hair as the turret is rotated.

Looking at the 550B case retaining method gave me an idea that works 100% of the time for the last few months. 3 coils of a very lightweight wire spring slips over the shellholder tightly. The top end of the spring is bent to point IN to the shell holder opening right against the bottom of it on the right hand side. A tiny steel arrowhead shape is soldered to the end. The case slips right past the "arrowhead" into the shellholder and the arrowhead holds a tiny bit of pressure on it, just enough pressure so the case NEVER jostles forward and has to pushed back.
Way faster and never whack a case or misalign for the primer seat.

Life is good now.

Potatohead
November 23, 2013, 11:33 AM
Oh my goodness I hate that too. I hold the dadgum case now, as it rises into the die. Just to get it started. You got a pic of that fix?

1SOW
November 23, 2013, 11:50 PM
LEE TURRET PRESS
DIY CASE RETAINER Obviously I haven't refined it, but it works so well I'm not inclined to make a prettier one.:D

You have to use a little imagination 'cuz my camera sucks. The glare is from my AC powered case light . There are two + coils of the spring wrapped around the Shell holder and mount. The TOP end of the spring is bent straight to point at the case in the shell holder. The little arrowhead (could have been shortened) is soldered to the end of the spring so its just contacting the case.
Hope this pic helps make sense out of my description.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-p46r792XjDU/UpGDydcoliI/AAAAAAAACmo/Jry2n6XQe30/s800/S4300004.JPG

Potatohead
November 24, 2013, 10:34 AM
Thanks

refuse2bafool
November 28, 2013, 02:00 PM
"I keep a notebook with load data so I know exactly which disc to use for a specific charge weight for each powder I use. (they provide a chart but it's always wrong...close in many cases...but wrong.)"

It's wrong because powder density varies from lot to lot and they have to give the high end of the density tolerance for safety. Lee suggests a more "scientific" method that I found works well each time you buy new powder.

1. Using a calibrated dipper take and weigh a given measure.

2. Divide the volume of the caliber by the charge weight and you will get cc/grain for that lot.

3. Mutiply that by the grains you want to use for a charge and that will tell you what disk cavity or charge bar setting to use.

You should get very close on the first try.

TroyUT
November 29, 2013, 06:43 AM
I turn my shellholder (on my Lee 4 hole turret) so that it faces left about 15 degrees. I have had no issues with brass moving since then. Am I not supposed to be doing that?

Foto Joe
November 29, 2013, 10:25 AM
I turn my shellholder (on my Lee 4 hole turret) so that it faces left about 15 degrees. I have had no issues with brass moving since then. Am I not supposed to be doing that?

Do what ever works for you. Being right handed I tend to sit just to the left of the press and my shell holder invariably migrates to the left with me 10-15 degrees. I have a tendency to touch the base of the brass as it bottoms out on the decap stroke so that the primer is lined up with the pocket correctly. As far as things staying lined up throughout the 4-die process, it really hasn't been an issue. I will say that I learned a long time ago to make sure that your finger tips are not between the brass and the whatever die it's about to go into. There's more than enough leverage on that ram to earn you the nickname "Stumpy."

Potatohead
November 30, 2013, 12:24 AM
I turn my shellholder (on my Lee 4 hole turret) so that it faces left about 15 degrees. I have had no issues with brass moving since then. Am I not supposed to be doing that?
I'll have to try that. Never even thought about tinkering with a fix yet, been concentrating so hard on not screwing anything up. Thanks.

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