Do you ever get bad news and just want to go shoot something to feel better?


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horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 06:09 PM
ok guys title is long yes I know I just received very bad news :( and Now all i want to do is load up the car. So I can go shoot my frustrations out not really for any good reason just blast away till I feel better I guess, and for all of you saftey Nazis I am not saying you should just go shoot a gun in any old direction you feel. The Big 4 rules still apply this is how I feel at the moment :banghead:

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7.62 Nato
July 9, 2013, 06:12 PM
Recoil Therapy :D

CoRoMo
July 9, 2013, 06:13 PM
I don't. I find comfort/encouragement in the Word or God.

That being said, the hobby of guns, hunting and shooting is in the top five passions of my life.

Nothing is going to change the situation that you recently got the news of, but changing the situation isn't really the issue; changing your view of it... or getting through it (coping with it)... is the real issue. I don't know how a range trip could change the way you view the situation, or could change the way you deal with the situation, or could get you through the situation.

IMHO, it will only temporarily get your mind off of the bad news and punt the inner healing down the field.

jcwit
July 9, 2013, 06:13 PM
NO!

silicosys4
July 9, 2013, 06:16 PM
Two things help me take my mind off of the stress in my life when I feel it is beginning to overwhelm me;
Riding
and Shooting.
Very nice to just let whatever is troubling me leave my head for a time, and just zone in on the matter at hand... forget about life for a second, and concentrate on that front sight. Sometimes concentrating on other things for a while is a good way to keep yourself from working yourself up over a situation you cannot change, and gives you time to cool down, helps keep you from being overwhelmed by negativity and emotion.
And of course, remember to stay safe.

Hope your troubles work themselves out for the better. God bless.

Midwest
July 9, 2013, 06:24 PM
No. Likewise shooting when drunk, even a drink or two, sick with a fever, or the flu, or overtired can be recipes for disaster.

silicosys4
July 9, 2013, 06:33 PM
No. Likewise shooting when drunk, even a drink or two, sick with a fever, or the flu, or overtired can be recipes for disaster.

Sorry, but being stressed out or upset is nothing like being drunk, having the flu, or being overtired, unless you have some serious anger issues.
The OP was not talking about shooting a voodoo dolly effigy of his boss while foaming at the mouth screaming curses.

Potatohead
July 9, 2013, 06:35 PM
Good answer CoRoMo...

I pretty much like to shoot all the time:)

Atbat82
July 9, 2013, 06:36 PM
I find it's good to get my mind off whatever bad news I got. Focus on shooting (site picture, site alignment, target acquisition, follow-up shots, etc). Gives me something else to focus on.

That said, as CoRoMo pointed out, it only puts off dealing with whatever needs dealing with. But sometimes clearing your head for an hour or two will give you a fresh perspective.

rookorami
July 9, 2013, 06:45 PM
Typically when I am really frustrated about something I just need to step away for a bit, and in a safe & constructive manner blow off some steam. For me shooting allows me to forget about it for a minute or set it aside and come back with a different perspective. And even if it still bothers me some never to the degree it did before the trip to the range. Therapeutic shooting is fine, just stay safe!

MedWheeler
July 9, 2013, 06:45 PM
I feel like I would, but I never really have tried it. To be honest, when I'm really frustrated with something, my performance at many other things tends to suffer, so it would probably be a waste, anyway.

Going for a drive in an old truck is, to me, very therapeutic.

allaroundhunter
July 9, 2013, 06:56 PM
I'm a fairly religious person so when I run into problems or struggles I turn to my bible and my Father for help.

Shooting is good at clearing my mind, but it doesn't get rid of them. If it is something that I need to deal with, going out to the range isn't going to solve the problem for me.

Queen_of_Thunder
July 9, 2013, 06:57 PM
No.

SharpsDressedMan
July 9, 2013, 07:13 PM
The disciplines of shooting, the required concentration and focus, and the refined physical demands make the act/art of shooting unable to let other things race around your mind. That translates into EXCELLENT stress relief. Actually, you are commanding yourself to BE stressed, in a more pleasant way, that probably releases those happy endorphins into your bloodstream. Nowadays, though, it is not "politically correct" to put up pictures of those that are stressing us out as targets.:)

12many
July 9, 2013, 07:19 PM
It is good to get out of the house to get perspective such as to the range or the country to do some shooting. Motorcycle riding is also great. Praying is great. It is important to keep perspective.

horsemen61
July 9, 2013, 07:27 PM
Thanks guys for all the replies

splattergun
July 9, 2013, 07:33 PM
karate and a heavy bag. :banghead:

shafter
July 9, 2013, 07:35 PM
While I haven't done it I don't see it as being different from spending a few rounds with the heavy bag. It doesn't have to be precision work, just blasting some shots into the backstop (safely) might feel the same.

gspn
July 9, 2013, 07:40 PM
Everyone has their thing...do what you need to do to clear your mind and de-stress.

mrnic3guy1989
July 9, 2013, 07:45 PM
I got a 96 Blazer LS in perfect shape but it needed a new engine got one without a warranty off of a guy selling one from his blazer that he wrecked.
Paid my girls stepdad to put it in and the first day i had it on the road it spun a baring. I immediately wanted to get out the Glock 20 and turn it into swiss cheese but I didnt and now I got a new engine with a warranty lol.

Chevelle SS
July 9, 2013, 08:01 PM
No.

itchy1
July 9, 2013, 08:04 PM
Like many others here, I experience a sort of catharsis from shooting. It can be a much healthier temporary break from reality than a lot of other things some people turn to. Sometimes a few hours away from the problem helps us to see it in a different light, often a more productive one.

Al Thompson
July 9, 2013, 08:12 PM
I find that doing some precision shooting (dot drills, walk backs) gets mind off things and gives me a real break as I have to concentrate on the five fundamentals of handgun shooting.

Good luck and best wishes.

Bobson
July 9, 2013, 08:16 PM
I don't. I find comfort/encouragement in the Word or God.

That being said, the hobby of guns, hunting and shooting is in the top five passions of my life.

Nothing is going to change the situation that you recently got the news of, but changing the situation isn't really the issue; changing your view of it... or getting through it (coping with it)... is the real issue. I don't know how a range trip could change the way you view the situation, or could change the way you deal with the situation, or could get you through the situation.

IMHO, it will only temporarily get your mind off of the bad news and punt the inner healing down the field.
I agree completely. I also agree with Midwest to a lesser extent. I wouldn't say shooting when angry/hurt is comparable to shooting when drunk, but I just don't shoot when I'm emotional.

Regarding physical things to do when stressed or upset, jogging has always been good therapy for this guy.

labhound
July 9, 2013, 08:22 PM
Me personally, I wouldn't go shooting. If I'd received some really bad news, I would probably be thinking about it the whole time I was shooting and not paying the right amount of attention to what I was suppose to be doing. :uhoh: When I'm shooting, I want to be solely focused on that and not have other drama slipping in. Just me, you may be different!

newfalguy101
July 9, 2013, 08:32 PM
I did.

A couple of days after my daughter was killed in an auto accident, I went out.....alone, just me, myself, my SKS and 100ish rounds of ammo.

I could feel the stress leaving my body with each scream along with each shot.

For the 20 or so minutes I was shooting I felt in control of SOMETHING finally.

As long as you go KNOWING its merely a very short term form of relief, go for it.

The comfort I find with my church family was, and still is more permanent, and through Jesus, more complete...

Thermactor
July 9, 2013, 08:34 PM
To answer the original poster's question... NO. I've never gotten stress relief by shooting anything. I find the thought completely unnerving.

cslinger
July 9, 2013, 08:54 PM
I absolutely shoot for stress relief. Not anger relief mind you. None of this I hate my boss or so and so etc so I will hang a target in effigy stuff. Just mind clearing shoot small holes, concentration or sometimes just the smell and noise bringing back good memories.

All that being said I am also very likely to find solace in The Lord or one of his angels sent to this earth, such as his angel Jack Daniels. :)

Just out of curiosity why would one find shooting to relieve stress un-nerving. No disrespect just curious. Again stress relief not anger relief. I don't shoot in anger. Imagined violence turns my stomach. I shoot for fun.

CPLofMARINES
July 9, 2013, 11:27 PM
A 4" S&W 29 does wonders. :D

Magnuumpwr
July 10, 2013, 12:12 AM
Bad news, no shooting. Feeling a little overwhelmed from work, heck yeah! The downside is it's like drugs. I started out with snuff cans of tanerite, now I am up to a pound to get the same results!! As to other answers, I will not make any assumptions about your individual choices.

Romeo 33 Delta
July 10, 2013, 12:22 AM
No ... if my concentration is clouded by issues and such, I don't shoot because at that point it's only turning money into noise. Soothing music is better therapy for me ... sometimes some good old rock n roll from 1950 - 1963 does the trick.

Onward Allusion
July 10, 2013, 12:27 AM
To each their own. I don't shoot to make myself feel better. I take a walk in the woods or do a bit of archery.

firesky101
July 10, 2013, 12:37 AM
I find that shooting is a form of mediation. It concentrates my thoughts onto one thing, and all the other thoughts leave my mind. It certainly helps me relieve stress and refocus my mind. I guess you could say I occasionally shoot to relieve anger/stress, but not out of anger/stress if that makes sense.

horsemen61
July 10, 2013, 02:46 AM
So today I went out and shot and I totally agree with the guys who said it helps because it did I went from being totally stressed to a clear focus as soon I as I set up to shoot just me my pistols and the target at 25 yards away and everything just fell away all I saw was that target and I had a blast it was probally the best trip I have ever had to the range.

Mitlov
July 10, 2013, 03:18 AM
Personally, I've never done it. I could see myself doing so if I was doing it to focus on something and clear my mind (single trap is great for this because it requires such complete focus to one simple thing). Kind of like what Thich Nhat Hanh calls "mindfulness meditation"...doing one simple task and using the entirety of your brain to focus on just that one task. But if I was going shooting after a bad day because I wanted to destroy something...if I caught myself thinking that, I hope I'd redirect the energy to something else, like weightlifting.

Guy B. Meredith
July 10, 2013, 04:21 AM
No. I might take some time and do some practice or marksmanship shooting, but it is more a zen moment to leave all the frustration behind. I do not use firearms to let off steam.

OilyPablo
July 10, 2013, 07:32 AM
Target shooting for me is an excellent form of stress relief, but I rarely (never?) carry anger anywhere (it's just the way my mind is built) . But as the others have said, a nasty week of work is all forgotten at the range. Mindful concentration breaks the stream of useless thoughts.

Davek1977
July 10, 2013, 07:37 AM
I find shooting to relieve stress, and to occupy my mind. When I get bad news, and "fixing" whatever the issue may be isnt an immediate option, there's not two things I'd rather happen than my stress levels being reduced and and my mind occupied by something else. So, why on earth would shooting be something to avoid? Why do some find the idea "scary"? I could understand the concern if I was randomly shooting with no regard to safety or the four rules, but thats hardly the case. If capable of operating a gun in a safe manner, I see nothing wrong with this sort of stres relief. In fact, theres been times when I was obviously stressed, and my wife or even my mother have suggested I "go shoot something" for a bit, because experince has taught them the soothing effect it has on me and my attitudes. People cope in different ways. Some crawl in a bottle, some take it out on others.....me?? I shoot. Its safe...its effective...and its not something I plan on changing simply because some people find it anything from odd to terrifying. I know what works for me, and others feelings about it don't concern me the slightest.

Carl N. Brown
July 10, 2013, 08:57 AM
And if you have access to private land with distant neighbors, shooting Tannerite targets can be theraputic.

Buck1959
July 10, 2013, 09:09 AM
Actually I can't focus on anything under extreme stress (death in family, etc). So shooting at a range wouldn't cut it for me. For extreme stress, I drive. Getting in my truck for a long, long drive allows me to meditate and I always return to my home feeling better.

Davek1977
July 10, 2013, 09:13 AM
If one loses all focus under stress, I can't for the life of me see how driving is ANY more safer than shooting. If you can't focus, don't do things that can cause death if you LOSE that focus for a few seconds.

Sav .250
July 10, 2013, 09:19 AM
I`m thing more like ...........regular therapy. A little couch time.

dhracer
July 10, 2013, 09:25 AM
My solution for stress is riding my mountain bike. Specifically riding my downhill bike as fast as possible on dangerous trails. Nothing clears the trivial BS from your brain like being in a life threatening situation.

Sometimes shooting helps blow off some steam, but it's not the same. Plus you always need to stay safe when shooting, biking not so much. It's one thing when other peoples lives are at risk.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2

bannockburn
July 10, 2013, 10:18 AM
Never have gone shooting to relieve stress or pent up anger but have found going to the batting cages to be very therapeutic.

tnelson31
July 10, 2013, 10:22 AM
The disciplines of shooting, the required concentration and focus, and the refined physical demands make the act/art of shooting unable to let other things race around your mind. That translates into EXCELLENT stress relief. Actually, you are commanding yourself to BE stressed, in a more pleasant way, that probably releases those happy endorphins into your bloodstream.
This!

GBExpat
July 10, 2013, 10:29 AM
Do you ever get bad news and just want to go shoot something to feel better?

Not so much shoot something as much as just walk out back (farm) and shoot some, absolutely.

Constrictor
July 10, 2013, 10:50 AM
absolutely. its good to blow off some steam once in awhile, always makes me feel better. being stressed out is nothing like being drunk.
always shoot safely.

Ranger Roberts
July 10, 2013, 10:53 AM
Best of luck in whatever you are going through. I have a few things to blow off some steam and shooting is one of the top 3, a motorcycle ride and a heavy bag round off the list.

Hanzo581
July 10, 2013, 11:20 AM
Considering to do this I'd have to drive to the range and wait in line to shoot I can safely say I've never done this. But if I could just go in the back yard and squeeze off a few rounds I absolutely would.

Arkansas Paul
July 10, 2013, 12:30 PM
I find shooting to be stress relief. As far as bad news, I don't know. I guess it would depend on the news. If it was a death in the family, I probably wouldn't. I would go to my family and be with them. If I found out I had some serious illness or something along those lines, I probably would.

But everyone is different. If that's what makes you feel better and you are still emotionally capable of keeping safety in mind, go for it.

erkman
July 10, 2013, 12:30 PM
Yes I have. It is a great stress reliever to go shoot some. It does help that I can do it in my back yard though.

ApacheCoTodd
July 11, 2013, 12:17 PM
Here's just the kind of thread that would come up in a future prosecution's/plaintiff's investigation, were a responder to be just a bit un-careful.

Temper adressed with the use of firearms. Yikes!


"Your Honor, I do believe my account was hacked at that time."

joustin
July 11, 2013, 05:24 PM
I don't get very angry or upset often so I can't comment on that. But it takes a lot of stress out as I can be alone in a stall and not be bothered while at the range. Until some comes in with a 500 super ultra awesome mag and blasts the target like it was a zombie on the attack. Then I have to leave as the noise bothers me at the indoor range.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

SharpsDressedMan
July 11, 2013, 06:19 PM
I wouldn't worry about it being brought up in court. A lawyer can call a psychologist anytime to confirm OR refute shooting for stress relief. But, when you think about it, if you ever have to shoot to defend yourself, isn't that EXACTLY what you are doing? Example: Bad guy pulls a gun on you, and says he is going to kill you. That causes you stress. The ONLY way to relieve that stress is to draw and shoot him first. You cannot assume he is kidding, or will just disappear. Simple stress relief. :D

horsemen61
July 11, 2013, 06:22 PM
I like the way you think sharps :D

blarby
July 11, 2013, 08:40 PM
Recoil therapy is great with reactive targets........

GBExpat
July 11, 2013, 10:37 PM
Stress, in this context, is a psychological manifestation based on mental or emotional challenges. Picking up a gun to relieve oneself from such duress, especially under these circumstances, is more than unhealthy. Maybe dangerous. It implies intellectual instability.

OK, all of you Guys & Gals who find shooting to be relaxing, take note.

Sam1911
July 11, 2013, 11:10 PM
Stress, in this context, is a psychological manifestation based on mental or emotional challenges. Picking up a gun to relieve oneself from such duress, especially under these circumstances, is more than unhealthy. Maybe dangerous. It implies intellectual instability.Methinks the author of this statement has a very lopsided and unrealistic view of motivations and mindset of the majority of us here when we "pick up a gun." (Or, as is much more likely, he's engaging in intensely subtle humor.)

While drinking or abusing drugs to numb the psychological effects of stress is patently unhealthy, engaging in a technical skill activity, the required concentration of which draws the conscious mind away from one's troubles for a time, and the successful execution of which introduces positive emotions to help counter the negative feelings one is experiencing can only be a beneficial thing.

If one looks at "picking up a gun" as a de facto violent act then obviously this does not hold true. But I'd wager there's very, very few of us who's cognitive associations of heading off to the range are ones of violence.

Mike J
July 11, 2013, 11:51 PM
Well said Sam. I have seen the time that my wife and I went through a very stressful situation. I spent the weekend at the hospital with her. When we got home from there my then teenage nieces came & spent 2 days helping her so I could work. That weekend & the next few days my time was spent either at the hospital.work or taking care of her & our at the time small children dealing with family etc. The first day things somewhat settled down I went to the range & cleared my head. I did not want to hurt anyone and was not angry. I just needed a little time away to let some steam off. I don't use shooting as a drug but it can be relaxing just like any other activity or hobby that gives one a few minutes respite & then lets them look at circumstances again with a clearer head.

SharpsDressedMan
July 12, 2013, 12:26 AM
1963-1964? Take your pick. Either JFK's assassination or the Beatles. Both changed the world. RE: MattShlock's "Theory": It is a great theory, but there are too many exceptions to the rule; so many shooters, abiding the law, shooting to relieve stress, and many here as participating THR members (let alone the rest of the otherwise sane shooters out there). That assumption just doesn't hold water.

Kynoch
July 12, 2013, 06:31 AM
I don't. I find comfort/encouragement in the Word or God.

That being said, the hobby of guns, hunting and shooting is in the top five passions of my life.

Nothing is going to change the situation that you recently got the news of, but changing the situation isn't really the issue; changing your view of it... or getting through it (coping with it)... is the real issue. I don't know how a range trip could change the way you view the situation, or could change the way you deal with the situation, or could get you through the situation.

IMHO, it will only temporarily get your mind off of the bad news and punt the inner healing down the field.

"The Word" (of God) = Jesus Christ = God the Son.

"The word" (of God) = Sacred Scripture.

Two entirely different things.

Sam1911
July 12, 2013, 08:12 AM
No Sam, I wasn't being sarcastic there. Oh? That's too bad.

I enjoy shooting, movies, squash (the game and the gourd) and long walks on the beach. Whatever. But when I want to "blow off some steam" or "relieve stress," irregular base mental conditions driven by overwhelming emotion, it sure isn't with a gun, a throttle, nor a bottle. A gun, throttle or bottle? What does that even mean? You're conflating very disparate things all of which can have intensely positive or intensely negative aspects. Self-medicating with a 5th of booze to dull the pain? Very negative. Sitting down to a drink with friends to relax and set aside the tensions of the day? Very positive.

Taking a long drive to relax and think and let a change of scenery brighten your mood? Very positive. Getting in your car and driving distractedly or aggressively? Very negative.

Grabbing a gun to go destroy something (or someone) because you're angry? Of course that's very negative. Heading to the range to spend a couple hours practicing your marksmanship, analogous to the meditative, zen, practice of a Kyudo archer with his bow -- or, shoot, just to have FUN -- is a very positive, healthy thing!

If you're unable to understand the differences here, you're suffering an unfortunate mental block that you should probably seek to remedy.

The concept is antithetical to balance, anathema to me, and I'm not even sure what those mean!You don't understand what that means because it doesn't mean anything. You just cribbed a pithy saying and used it inaptly.

Seriously, the thought never even crosses my mind and, thinking about it, it's just the wrong thing at the wrong time. No, "bad news has never made me want to go shoot something to feel better" and I am not sure those it has should be allowed to have a gun.Again, you're displaying a distressing misunderstanding here that the reason one picks up a firearm is necessarily to shoot/destroy some-THING (or, obviously, some-ONE) -- as though the destruction of that thing was the goal. I don't think a single person polled here at THR would tell you they hit the range to destroy targets. While self-defense training has specific goals which are violent in nature, most shooting is simply a refined skills practice -- a meditation on self, in a way -- and is about as violent or unbalanced as playing the piano or flower gardening.

Yup, I went there. Said it...I'm a little worried for you. These things you're saying or feeling aren't quite normal.

Sam1911
July 12, 2013, 08:51 AM
I'll add that if you're acting out rage, trying to cathartically expunge your bad emotions by violent exercise (which isn't necessarily a negative thing, either) I wouldn't do THAT with a gun.

In that case, you're looking to drive yourself to a point of emotional exhaustion and release, often significantly loosening self-control. That's something best done with a heavy punching bag or some other safe outlet. Guns require too much control and presence of mind for that.

But that's a distinctly different activity than simply shooting to relieve stress, anxiety, depression, etc.

Lee Roder
July 12, 2013, 02:14 PM
No.

EmbarkChief
July 12, 2013, 03:05 PM
There is nothing wrong with going to the range to get your mind off of what's bothering you. I've done it on a few occasions and always leave feeling more calm and relaxed. However, if "bad news" involves family, death, or other BAD NEWS then you should leave the firearms at home IMOP.

Unfortunately I had a situation that involved my little sister passing away 6 years ago. The day she passed I went home, unloaded my carry pistol, put it in the safe and spun the dial. I knew that my mind wasnt' right and I had no buisness packing at that time. It was two weeks before I started carrying again.

rookorami
July 12, 2013, 03:27 PM
I think Sam did a great job of showing how its not really black and white. Your motivations and your "goal" so to speak really matter. But it is a personal thing and everyone must judge what works best for them. For everyone's sake I home that most choose well.

newfalguy101
July 12, 2013, 08:20 PM
Stress, in this context, is a psychological manifestation based on mental or emotional challenges. Picking up a gun to relieve oneself from such duress, especially under these circumstances, is more than unhealthy. Maybe dangerous. It implies intellectual instability. Stick to your Jack Daniels (not you personally, just using your example) -- another great escape. There are plenty of others that are even less balanced, legal, seemly, or adult.


I really hope yer just funning, cuz to seriously suggest its "healthy" to crawl into a bottle when stressed out........yea, gotta be a joke Ha ha ha


By the way, I will be sure to mention your opinion to the counselor if I meet with her again, I spect she would get a chuckle out of it.....

LaVere
July 12, 2013, 09:16 PM
No, not ever.

SharpsDressedMan
July 13, 2013, 12:23 AM
This is exactly why hunting has been around so long, even after man didn't have to go out and hunt daily to survive. Being able to shoot and kill an animal, whether we like it or not, satisfies a primal urge to kill. If we did away with contact sports, hunting, and martial arts, etc, pretty soon people would experience pent up anxiety and stress, and pent up primal urges, and start acting out in less acceptable ways. This isn't a hard and fast rule for EVERYONE, but mankind as a whole. When the anti-hunters take to the woods, they would be aware that they are bordering on testing the limits of "civilized" men. I think if you kick an otherwise peaceful and "civilized" dog often enough, it will show you what it was designed to do.

HOOfan_1
July 13, 2013, 01:10 AM
So....you are asking, if I am unhappy....do I want to go do something I like to do?

Yes, when I am unhappy, I go and do something that makes me happy.

Shooting makes me happy. Do I want to shoot something for the act of destruction? Nope. I want to shoot because it makes me happy.

Golf makes some people happy....they like to go out and drive golf balls when they are unhappy....I hate golf however.

Driving/riding motorcycles or bikes makes some people happy. So they do it when they are unhappy in order to become happy.

Al Thompson
July 13, 2013, 08:41 AM
I think this one is done. If the OP still has a question, he can PM me. :)

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