What's your 223/5.56 "zero'd" for and why?


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Sour Kraut
July 10, 2013, 10:46 PM
I'm new to AR ownership and not certain the best all around zero distance for my needs Looking for a compromise between short range (HD) distance and mid range without a lot of hold over. Seems like 50 yds is a good compromise for shooting from 25 to 300 yds. What are your thoughts?

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TIMC
July 10, 2013, 10:50 PM
I never shoot more than 200 yards so a 100 yard zero is good for me.

beeenbag
July 10, 2013, 10:52 PM
Your sight trajectory and bullet trajectory will cross each other twice, the height of the sights from the bore will determine where the second crossing will be.

Mohave-Tec
July 10, 2013, 10:52 PM
I'm new to an AR also but it seems to me that if you zero a scope/dot at 50 yards with a scope that is centered 3 inches over the bore then you will be 18 inches over at 300 yards minus bullet drop. Too much guess work for me. I will zero at 100 yards and not bank on shots over 200. I have long rifles for the longer shots.
Am I missing anything here?

Auto426
July 10, 2013, 11:04 PM
I'm not as experienced as some with an AR, but after a good bit of reading I plan on staying with a 50/200 yard zero for the immediate future. At the typical ranges that I will encounter I'm my neck of the woods, it should be more than adequate for anything I will come across.

back40
July 10, 2013, 11:11 PM
google "revised improved battlesight zero". my irons are set up this way, and RDs are zeroed at 50.

rcmodel
July 10, 2013, 11:15 PM
I sight in every rifle I own at Maximum Point Blank Range.

It's the only logical way to do it.

For an AR-15 shooting 55 grain FMJ, that would be approximately:
1.2" high at 100.
0 at 200.
3" low at 250.

In other words, you don't have to hold over or under out to 250 and the bullet path will not be more then 3" from the POA.

rc

briansmithwins
July 10, 2013, 11:18 PM
I do a rough zero at 50 and fine tune it at 200 yards. Don't need any holdover or under for most targets out to 250 or so.

BSW

GCBurner
July 10, 2013, 11:20 PM
A 25-meter zero will be on target out to about 300 meters, thanks to the flat trajectory of the 5.56 round.

yzguy87
July 10, 2013, 11:25 PM
My scope is zeroed at 100yds. I like it that way bc it's point blank out to 200. I haven't had the chance to shoot beyond that.

Willie Sutton
July 10, 2013, 11:28 PM
Inch over at 100 works out to 300.


Willie


.

holdencm9
July 10, 2013, 11:29 PM
MPBR (as RC said) is the best way to go, it will vary based on your exact ammo/rifle and what size target you plan to shoot, but you can generally get pretty close with your "typical" ammo and just leave it alone. For instance if you are like me and 90% of your shooting is 55-62gr ammo, just take your favorite 55gr ammo and sight in for a convenient distance (50 yards for me), assuming a 6" diameter target. You could assume a 12" diameter target as a typical COM of a person, or what-have-you.

To be most precise you'll need a chronograph, but the whole point of MPBR is so that you don't have to think so much. But for fun you can go to Hornady's (or any decent) ballistic calculator and type in some values to see what happens.

For a 55gr Hornady FMJ BT (BC = 0.243) and muzzle velocity 2900 fps (assuming sight is 2.5 inches above bore axis)

25 -1.1"
50 0.0"
100 +1.3"
125 +1.4" (highest it ever goes, still within target)
150 +1.2"
200 -0.4"
250 -3.9" (just outside your target)
300 -9.5"

As you can see, a 50-yard zero will never go higher than 1.4" but will drop outside your intended target prior to the 250-yard mark. So you would maybe consider a closer zero (or making it so that the impact at 50 yards hits a bit higher, however you like to think about it). To really optimize the MPBR, you have will have to be x.x" above or below the target at a certain distance, but personally I just like to put the crosshairs on the target and truly "zero" at that distance.

avs11054
July 10, 2013, 11:29 PM
We were always trained to zero at 50 yards. We used Colts. With that zero, it was dead on at 50 and 200 yards. It was 1 inch high at 100 yards. At 300, we aimed at the head of a sillouette, and it hit center mass.

Sapper771
July 10, 2013, 11:34 PM
I Zero Irons and red dots at 50 yards. I prefer it over the Military 25 meter zero.

taliv
July 11, 2013, 09:51 AM
i use 50/200 for red dot sites.
ACOGS and such with special reticles, depends on the reticle
i use 100 yard zero for scopes with target turrets

Gordon
July 11, 2013, 09:55 AM
I zero the BUIS at 50 yards and the optical device at 200 yards.

ID-shooting
July 11, 2013, 09:59 AM
I just put a scope on my AR, book says to zero at 200. Headed to the range this afternoon to zero and then test where drop puts things.

Art Eatman
July 11, 2013, 12:46 PM
I set up all my scoped rifles for right at 2" high at 100 yards. That's generally pretty close to dead-on at 200 and roughly 6" low at 300.

That holds reasonably well for the .223 and all the deer cartridges that are faster than a .30-30. It excludes the magnums and the serious .22 centerfires.

Coyote3855
July 11, 2013, 12:49 PM
RC is the man, as usual.

ThePenguinKnight
July 11, 2013, 01:20 PM
http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=107572

Interesting article/post from m4carbine.net. Also be sure to check out the threads linked at the top of the OP. Just food for thought, not necessarily my own opinion; whatever you sight your rifle for, make sure you understand how it works in your individual rifle, and test it out as best as you are able.

I don't have an AR (yet), but I do like to read. To paraphrase a wise Biblical person, the first step of being smart is trying to get smarter =P

snakeman
July 11, 2013, 01:30 PM
100 yards, 40 grain vmax, for yotes

HoosierQ
July 11, 2013, 01:39 PM
I followed the military iron sight zeroing protocol for an M16A2 which what my setup was like. Except I couldn't get on the very limited 25 yard range that day and did it at 50. It worked like a charm and I am good at 25, 50, and 100. I have no access to a longer range and mine is for punching paper in these, what pass for peaceful times. My FIL has coyote problems and as soon as his wife and my wife start speaking again :rolleyes: I hope to assist with that. Every tried to hunt coyotes with a shotgun? Yeah...

YZ
July 11, 2013, 02:09 PM
My AR has a red dot. I sighted it in at 100 yards. That's about as far as I can see the .223 hits. I like practicing offhand, standing. If I shoot at a closer range, I can adjust quickly. I am not interested in a range longer than 100 also because my scoped bolt action rifle is better for that.

stumpers
July 11, 2013, 02:19 PM
I recently switched from an Aimpoint back to irons. I zeroed at 25 meters with the small aperture, and use my large aperture (50m) for most shooting.

byf43
July 11, 2013, 02:22 PM
AR-HBAR is zero'd at 100. I'm good holding 'center mass' out to 300+ yds. (If it'll hit inside of a paper plate at those distances, I'm good to go.)

Remington 799 in .223 is zero'd at 100, also.



Either one = 25 yds to 300 yards I'm gonna be either dead on or +/- 3 inches.

fanchisimo
July 11, 2013, 02:46 PM
I've never heard of MPBR, but it uses the same reasoning I do for my 50/200 yd zero.

Arizona_Mike
July 11, 2013, 03:18 PM
It depends on my optic. For My EOTech I use the center dot at 50/200 and that gives me the lower dot at 500 and the bottom of the ring at 7 yards.

For my Burris LTS, I use the center of the center dot at 100, the bottom of the center dot at 200, 2nd dot at 300, 3rd dot at 400, and so on until the lowest dot at 600.

Iron sights: 50/200 IBZ.

Mike

rcmodel
July 11, 2013, 03:31 PM
Here is a good read on the logic of using MPBR to zero your rifle.

http://www.rmvh.com/MPBR.htm

rc

Bovice
July 11, 2013, 03:55 PM
I use a 25 yard zero for my 16" AR with Aimpoint H1, and a 100 yard zero for the stainless 20" free floated bull barrel AR with a 24 power scope which usually sits at 10x.

The 16" will easily hit within an inch or two of POA at 100, and the 20" is good at 200 too. With the 55 grain bullets I'm usually shooting, that's plenty. The 16" has been used for carbine courses, and the only correction I have to account for at CQ distance is the height difference between the sight plane and the barrel (about 2.5"), which only matters for REALLY precise shots. Hitting silhouettes in the vital zone does not require compensation.

joeschmoe
July 11, 2013, 04:04 PM
50 METERS. A2 irons, 55gr WWB. Aimpoint H1 mini red dot is matched to that. I can transition from irons to red dot with the same point of aim.

This matches the iron sights adjustment out to 600 meters.

AABEN
July 11, 2013, 04:17 PM
I set all of my long guns from 223 up to 30.06 at 150 yards. That way you are a little high at 100 Yd and a little low at 200 Yd it works good for me.

Cosmoline
July 11, 2013, 04:54 PM
I did RIBZ with my A2 sight and have adjusted the A1 sight to 100 meters.

Averageman
July 11, 2013, 05:07 PM
RC Model;
Thanks thats what makes perfect sense and what I have been doing at the range for years.
I hope everyone takes a minute and reads that Link.

Sour Kraut
July 11, 2013, 06:28 PM
RC: thanks for the info and the links. It makes so much sense and your perspective is exactly why I was looking for. I'm off to the range next week armed with great intel! Sighting in my AR for the first time.....Irons and Aimpoint Pro.

Ar180shooter
July 11, 2013, 06:33 PM
i use 50/200 for red dot sites.
ACOGS and such with special reticles, depends on the reticle
i use 100 yard zero for scopes with target turrets
This. I do exactly this.

tactikel
July 11, 2013, 07:23 PM
+3, 50 yards reddot, and 100 yards for scope with ballistic reticle.

carbine85
July 11, 2013, 09:47 PM
Iron sights - 2" above zero = O at 200
I use O at 100 with my scoped rifle and it has a bullet drop compensator built in for 200, 300 and so on.

mf-dif
July 12, 2013, 10:31 PM
25 yards.

Art Eatman
July 12, 2013, 10:42 PM
I've sighted in many and many a sub-MOA rifle. What I've found is that dead-on at 25 yards can be two to three inches off at 100 yards. High doesn't hurt, but off to one side by two inches is a real bummer.

WVRJ
July 14, 2013, 09:51 PM
I go 2 inches high at 100,that makes it on at 225.I also use the turret to go beyond that setting when I'm poppin milk jugs full of water at 600.Sort of a mixed up method,but it works for me.

rcmodel
July 14, 2013, 09:59 PM
What I've found is that dead-on at 25 yards can be two to three inches off at 100 yards.This!

A 25 yard zero isn't zeroed at all, if you truly want to hit something small a long ways away.

25 yards is only good to get on paper for a preliminary zero before moving on out to 100 or more to dial in the last few clicks for a true zero.

rc

Dr T
July 15, 2013, 04:09 PM
2" high at 100 yards. It makes it a point blank shooter within the field limitation of the cartridge.

wgaynor
July 16, 2013, 06:42 PM
For my AR15, 100 yard iron sights and 25 yards laser. For my Remington 700, 2inches high at 100 yards and use mildots for anything past 300.

wgaynor
July 16, 2013, 06:43 PM
The real key is to stick to a specific projectile and practice with it at different distances to know your limitations.

Sour Kraut
July 16, 2013, 11:18 PM
I'm going to the range tomorrow to sight in my new rifle; irons and Aimpoint Pro. After mounting the Aimpoint (1/3 co-witness) the two are out of alignment windage wise. So obviously I have some work to do with one or both sight systems. I have access to 25, 50, and 100 yard targets. Should I start at 25 or 50 to start the process?

s2brutus
July 17, 2013, 12:02 AM
My various .223/5.56's (not just ARs) are zeroed for either 100 or 200, according to what I do with them.

The couple that are zeroed at 200 are ARs and that's because I shoot the occasional CMP "Modern Military Rifle" match with them.

The ones that are zeroed at 100 are "just because".

:)

C-grunt
July 17, 2013, 01:08 PM
Travis Haely did a REALLY good video on AR zeroes. Doesn't go into opinion much, just shows the facts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60zbwMYJiLI

allaroundhunter
July 17, 2013, 01:23 PM
My competition AR is zeroed for 100 yards because the MTac on top of it has a BDC that is dead on out to 600 yards when zeroed at that distance.

My defensive AR wears an Eotech and is zeroed at 50 yards.

allaroundhunter
July 17, 2013, 01:26 PM
I'm going to the range tomorrow to sight in my new rifle; irons and Aimpoint Pro. After mounting the Aimpoint (1/3 co-witness) the two are out of alignment windage wise. So obviously I have some work to do with one or both sight systems. I have access to 25, 50, and 100 yard targets. Should I start at 25 or 50 to start the process?

Start at 25 to make sure you are on paper. Get it close to zero there and then move to 50. Take a shot or 2 there and make sure you are still close to zero (within a couple inches) and then move to 100

benEzra
July 17, 2013, 03:41 PM
With my sight height (Eotech on a lower 1/3 cowitness), zeroing at 50 yards gives a second zero right around 200, so that is what I go with.

Sour Kraut
July 18, 2013, 12:22 AM
Thanks for the input guys!

I zeroed it at 50 which makes me about 1.5-2" high at 100. The far zero should be at about 245 "according to my chart for the round" but I cannot confirm at this gun range.

Jaxondog
July 18, 2013, 12:40 AM
I zero mine, which is a Savage Axis to hit 1.5" high @100yds, that way I should be on @200 depending what weight bullet I'm using. Usually 55gr. unless I'm really serious, then it would be 52 gr.

TrickyDick
July 18, 2013, 12:50 AM
25 Meter 'Battle Zero'. Worked good in the army, works good now.

jim243
July 18, 2013, 12:50 AM
Seems like 50 yds is a good compromise for shooting from 25 to 300 yds. What are your thoughts?

Right on, a very good zero.

Jim

SFCRandall
July 18, 2013, 01:23 AM
Download and print an M4 zero target (free) off the internet and follow the instructions. It will get you zeroed at 25 yards. That zero is effective out to 300 yards, and anything beyond can be dialed in with the 6/3 dial bellow the windage knob. Be sure to flip to the small aperture for ranges beyond 200 yards.

45_auto
July 18, 2013, 08:09 AM
AR-HBAR is zero'd at 100. I'm good holding 'center mass' out to 300+ yds. (If it'll hit inside of a paper plate at those distances, I'm good to go.)

I've never seen a 2 foot diameter paper plate. That's huge! I'd have to laugh seeing someone put one out that big. But I guess it's all good as long as you can get'em big enough to keep you happy!

tuj
July 18, 2013, 01:55 PM
My 20" scoped AR is zeroed at 100 yards. My 16" CQB AR is zeroed at 50'.

If you enjoyed reading about "What's your 223/5.56 "zero'd" for and why?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!