AR locking storage...


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SwissArmyDad
July 19, 2013, 06:03 PM
So I have a Gunvault magvault, currently, which actually is a very good way to keep my kids/kids friends/etc away from my AR while I'm gone.

I've been thinking about putting a Simplex deadbolt on my closet door, though, and keeping the AR in more of a ready state with a mag in, and an empty chamber, or maybe just fully loaded with the safety on.

Problem is, this is also my dressing closet, so I'd have to be pretty diligent to keep it locked, as I'd be in and out of it every day/all day.

Another option would be to put a simple, small stack-on locker inside, or maybe a locking closet safe from V-line, but I'd honestly like to keep this under or around $100.00 since I'm technically good to go with my current setup, and those options get pricey.

Our pistols are taken care of with locking keypad gun boxes, so this is soley a quick access rifle storage question.

Thanks for any input that you can give!

Cheers, SwArDad.



Oh, and I use to have a big 16 gun safe out in the garage that I never used, and eventually sold. I don't like the possibility of rust with safe storage, and it was a dial combo, so it took forever to access. Not what I'm looking for.

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hso
July 19, 2013, 06:10 PM
Is it your house to "modify"? If so, you can install an in-wall behind the clothing and have the key hanging where it is readily available, but out of sight.
http://shop.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=593357&pm2d=CSE-SPG-3-GOOGLE&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cse

http://www.prepperforums.net/forum/attachments/handguns-pistols-revolvers-long-rifles-shotguns-sks-ak-ar/161d1342151944t-stack-iwc-55-wall-cabinet-great-hidden-preps-also-concealed-wall-safe-31bb9r5thgl.jpg

SwissArmyDad
July 19, 2013, 06:13 PM
Yes, my house, good detail to have.

thefish
July 20, 2013, 12:59 AM
I've been thinking about putting a Simplex deadbolt on my closet door..........

Problem is, this is also my dressing closet, so I'd have to be pretty diligent to keep it locked, as I'd be in and out of it every day.

How about replacing the closet doorknob with a keypad deadbolt. I have seen them for around a hundred at Home Depot. You can set some of them to auto lock after a minute.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/100608037?productId=100608037&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&MERCH=REC%2d%5f%2dproduct%2d1%2d%5f%2d202176448%2d%5f%2d100608037%2d%5f%2dN#.UeoX_8u9KSM

SwissArmyDad
July 20, 2013, 02:23 PM
How about replacing the closet doorknob with a keypad deadbolt. I have seen them for around a hundred at Home Depot. You can set some of them to auto lock after a minute.

Thats a very good idea. I like the relocking feature that you mentioned if its available.

CB900F
July 21, 2013, 03:41 PM
SwissArmyDad;

As a professional locksmith I've got some comments on the Simplex/electronic d-bolt question. We tried the Master brand electronic deadbolt & found it to be unreliable & quit carrying them. Although its usually priced over your budget, we went to the Schlage powerbolt. That product is also available in an entry lever form, which might very well work a bit better for you. It will light the keypad which is a huge help at night, it has a key override, and being a lever it's easier to operate in case you're in a full-press emergency hurry.

The Simplex is a pure mechanical unit, which can be seen as an advantage also. No batteries to fail, but does have a limited number of possible combos. That's offset by the feature that allows two buttons to be pressed at once being a discrete part of the combo. Depending on which Simplex you get it may or may not have a key override.

My personal opinion is to have a key override if possible. A lot of the practicality of that depends on you though. If you label the keys, there will be two, and put at least one of them in a secure storage, you'll probably not have a problem.

900F

SwissArmyDad
July 22, 2013, 12:51 AM
Thanks for the info, 900f. Appreciated!

FAS1
July 22, 2013, 09:29 AM
The Simplex is a pure mechanical unit, which can be seen as an advantage also. No batteries to fail, but does have a limited number of possible combos. That's offset by the feature that allows two buttons to be pressed at once being a discrete part of the combo. Depending on which Simplex you get it may or may not have a key override.

My personal opinion is to have a key override if possible. A lot of the practicality of that depends on you though. If you label the keys, there will be two, and put at least one of them in a secure storage, you'll probably not have a problem.

900F

Can you recommend a reasonably secure backup key lock for this application? I have looked into it, but seems like the backup lock could easily be defeated. What would you recommend as a professional if you were going to offer that option with a pushbutton lock?

CB900F
July 22, 2013, 05:12 PM
Fella's;

The answer to the question is that old standby: "well, it depends".

Much of what it depends on is how much you want to spend. If you buy the Schlage Powerlever, it'll come with two 5 pin Schlage C keyway keys. If there isn't a lot of variation in the cut depths on the key, take it to an ALOA locksmith & have it repinned to minimize the possibility it can be picked. We charge $10.00 plus the cost of however many new keys you want for a rekey. The Schlage is selling for around $125.00 - 130.00 I think at a local Lowe's Depot type store. The Schlage will hold 19 different combo's also. Therefore it's nice if you can remember one set of numbers but the wife can't & needs her own combo. These are nice on the front door too; you give the plumber who puts in your new water heater a combo. He does the job, you wipe the combo, and he never had a key.

But, if you want a Simplex with a key override, then you're going from about $150.00 to close to $500.00 for the lock itself. That doesn't count the secure cylinder for the lock, or the keys. Probably more than you want to spend.

Secure key override with an electronic unit can be more. An Alarm Lock Trilogy is an excellent unit in my experience. Holds slightly over 90 discrete combo's, available in either interior or weatherproof build, gold or silver color and can hold a Medeco Keymark cylinder. But, now we're pushing the living daylights out of $800.00. Keymark does give you some very real key advantages though. First, you have true key control. The locksmith selling you the system will get your identification & have you fill out a access log. The only shop that can make your keys is his, by signature and I.D. He will also have a record of the key & can produce more at need. He will be able to tell you how many keys have been cut & who signed for them.

Doesn't matter if Joe Burglar takes a Keymark key to Ace Hardware & tell's 'em to copy it - they can't. The keyway is contracted to that shop & is not available to hardware stores, or another locksmith. Joe could go to a Keymark dealer 500 miles away & put a gun to the smith's head & tell him to cut the key or die. I'd cut it and not worry about it. That guy's keyway is different from mine. My Keymark key won't go into his locks & vice-versa.

It's good security, but you pay for it. And big-box store cheapy door locks can't take Keymark cylinders. If you do want to go that way & have some control on costs go either Arrow or S. Parker locks, about $65.00 for an entry lock & then you pay the locksmith for the Keymark cylinder that goes into the lock & the keys. Figure roughly around $150.00 per lock be it a Schlage manual deadbolt or an Arrow/S. Parker entry knob.

900F

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